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August 2012

How Tweet it is: Metro Manilans rise above the floods with Information and Communication Technology

Artessa Saldivar-Sali's picture



After reading a World Bank publication about leveraging ICT for development, I wondered how Manilenos used their social networks to remain resilient to the devastating floods of the past weeks. In a country with a per capita income that is only 56% of the East Asia & Pacific regional average, the data for ICT penetration is astounding (although anybody who knows how popular SMS is in the Philippines might not be surprised):

My curiosity piqued, and wanting to find out how my friends were holding up, I set up a (highly unscientific) poll of my Facebook network to find out how social media, mobile communication, and ICT are used by Metro Manilans during disasters.  The following are just a few examples of the answers:

Food price shocks and low-income countries

Hans Lofgren's picture

The current US drought and its emerging effects on food markets underscore the timeliness and importance of this year’s Global Monitoring Report (GMR), which focused on international food prices, nutrition, and MDGs. One key message of the report, which should be taken on board when the emerging crisis is assessed, is that the effects of changes in international food prices depend on the time frame and on country characteristics, most importantly on shares of domestic supply that are exported or imported and the related issue of the extent to which domestic and international markets are linked. While it is possible for governments to mitigate the effects of international price changes, this can be quite costly, requiring higher taxes, more borrowing, or less spending in other areas, giving rise to difficult trade-offs between various competing development objectives. However, for most countries, given that food trade represents a small share of food supplies and demands, domestic conditions determine to a large extent whether sufficient food is available at prices that are affordable also for the less fortunate – it depends on household incomes and the ability of the agricultural sector to ramp up production. It is important not to exaggerate the role of international markets, especially beyond the short run, when farmers have had the opportunity to respond to international price developments.

Learning from China’s rise to escape the Middle-Income trap

Volker Treichel's picture

Latin America’s economic performance has been improving steadily over the past decade.  Driven by high commodity prices and capital inflows, growth rose above that in the G7 and also helped for the first time to reduce poverty and high income inequality. More than 70 million Latin Americans were lifted out of moderate poverty between 2003 and 2012 and at least 12 countries in the region experienced non-trivial declines in their income Gini coefficients.  In parallel, the middle classes expanded and, as a result, income inequality fell throughout the region. The effectiveness of Latin America's economic reforms since 2000 was evidenced by the resilience of its economies during the recent crisis. In fact, the region's recession was relatively short-lived, and with the exception of Mexico, remarkably mild, partly as a result of effective counter-cyclical monetary, fiscal and credit policies made possible as a result of the sustained macroeconomic stabilization since 2000.  Yet, Latin America remains trapped in a middle income status and has made little progress in converging to the per capita incomes of advanced countries (Figure 1).

Education Wonkwar: The Final Salvo. Kevin Watkins responds to Justin Sandefur on Public v Private

Duncan Green's picture

The posts are getting longer, so it’s probably a good time to call a halt, but at least you had the weekend to read Kevin Watkins‘ response to Justin Sandefur on private v public education provision. If you have even more time, it’s worth reading (and relishing) the whole exchange: Justin post 1; Kevin post 1; Justin post 2 and now this.

Dear Justin,

Thank you for the response. I’d also like to thank Duncan for setting up the discussion, along with the many people, on both sides of the debate, who have contributed their ideas and experiences. Whatever our differences, I think all of us share a conviction that decent quality education has the power to transform lives, expand opportunities, and break the cycle of poverty. There is no greater cause, or more important international development challenge, than delivering on the promise of decent quality education for all children.

Quote of the Week: Nandan Nilekani

Sina Odugbemi's picture

"Well, I think the way I see it simply is in the private sector the number of people you're to come into is much less. You convince your management team, your board, your investors, your analysts and you go and do something, go in new direction, buy a company, whatever.

In the public space, you are answerable to a lot more stakeholders, the government, parliament, bureaucracy, activists, journalists, the judicial system, the investigators. So I think what I learned is the amount of time you are to invest in evangelizing and consensus building is hugely more in the public space. And crafting a strategy which is sort of acceptable to everybody really takes a great deal of time. And that's where the big difference to me between the two worlds."

 

-Nandan Nilekani, Author of Imagining India and Co-founder of Infosys

-As quoted in an interview on Fareed Zakaria GPS, July 1, 2012

Private Schools or Public? Justin Sandefur responds to Kevin Watkins

Duncan Green's picture

Everyone enjoyed last week’s arm-wrestle on public v private education, so in a titanic struggle for the last word, Justin Sandefur (right, in the private corner) and Kevin Watkins (in the public one) are back for another go. Seconds out, round two…..

Dear Kevin,

Thanks for your reply. You are of course quite right that I wear a Pearson corporation logo on a chain around my neck to ward off evil spirits, I can’t stand (or understand) solutions with multiple steps and regularly visit my local medium to have a chat with the sadly departed Milton Friedman.  But despite all that, I want to contend that we agree on almost all the necessary ingredients for a constructive policy discussion.  I’ll end with where I think our core disagreements are.

Supporting innovation in climate technologies and job creation in Morocco

Roger Coma Cunill's picture
Last year, Mr. Berrada patented a new invention for solar-water heaters at the Moroccan Office of Property Rights (OMPIC). His idea is to improve the efficiency of solar-water heaters by introducing a heat-transport fluid system specially designed for buildings and communities. Mr. Berrada, a state engineer and a graduate of the Hassania School of Public Works, dreams of bringing his concept into commercial reality. But he struggles.

The case for solar power in the Middle East and North Africa

Amin Mohseni-Cheraghlou's picture

We often hear about the Middle East and North Africa’s centrality in global energy markets as it is home to more than 52 and 42 percent of global reserves of oil and gas respectively. The region is also responsible for more than 36 and 20 percent of global oil and gas production. However, MENA is also the world leader in other aspects of the energy markets, namely energy use and energy intensity (i.e. energy use per $1,000 of output). Between 1981 and 2009 these grew faster in MENA than any other region.

Goodbye Financial Engineers, Hello Political Wonks

Otaviano Canuto's picture

This week marks the fifth anniversary of the global financial crisis. Five years ago, the world of finance was shocked when BNP Paribas announced a freeze of three of its money market funds that were undergoing a deadly run of withdrawals. At that moment, a huge pyramid of complex financial assets—then sustained as collateral accepted by banks and the “shadow banking system”—hedge funds and money market funds—started to crumble.


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