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September 2012

Jobs in the Arab world are about stability as much as prosperity

Hana Brixi's picture
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

There is more to unemployment than the simple fact of not having a job. It brings with it a whole set of additional difficulties, and on a large scale can have far reaching social consequences. This is especially true for young people struggling with a lack of stable employment and weak prospects for landing any permanent work. Jobs are an important source of social identity, and without one, young people can be cast adrift.

Bringing New Environmental Technologies to China

Jianxiong Peng's picture

For youth entrepreneurs, the challenges are especially great because of their lack of business experience. We spoke with Jianxiong Peng, a youth entrepreneur from Beijing and the cofounder and Chief Executive Officer of KOE Technology Investment Co, Ltd. Peng's company aims to transfer top environmental technologies from developed countries – such as Japan – which can solve Chinese environmental problems and then incubate companies for each transferred technology. The company now has 45 employees, 85% of which are younger than the age of 33. 

What will it take for youth to get better jobs?

Ravi Kumar's picture

Last week, we launched a global conversation on what will it take... to end poverty? ....for your family to be better off? .... for all to get an education? This week, people from around the world joined the discussion with their own question: #whatwillittake for youth to get better jobs?

Let’s Put Education First

Elizabeth King's picture

Today in New York, the U.N. Secretary General announces the launch of his Education First initiative to raise the political profile of education, strengthen the global movement to achieve quality education and generate additional funding through sustained advocacy efforts. 

It’s an exciting step on the road to achieving the Millennium Development Goals, and reconfirms the world’s commitment to education as a basic human right and fundamental building block for development.

Migration and Europe: Some brief thoughts on a theoretical sudden stop in immigration

Bryce Quillin's picture

The World Economic Forum recently published a very interesting Q&A with Ian Goldin that bore the arresting title: "What if rich countries shut the door on immigration?" Goldin is director of Oxford University's Martin School and in this short Q&A, he provides a thought exercise on the big picture consequences of a theoretical shutting down of immigration in developed countries.

A role for justice in poverty alleviation: The World Bank’s new strategy for justice reform

Christina Biebesheimer's picture

We know justice matters in development. Barriers to access to justice are a central dimension of poverty and an effective justice system is essential in ensuring a capable and accountable state. Across the world people strive to live in fair societies, where power is not exercised arbitrarily and fundamental rights are respected. 

Development Theory v Practice: Visiting Oxfam’s Work in Mindanao

Duncan Green's picture

For me, one of the most fruitful aspects of ‘field trips’ such as last week’s visit to see Oxfam’s work in the Philippines is the exchange it sets up in my head between the academic literature and debates I’ve been ploughing through in the UK, and the reality of our work on the ground. A good trip confirms, improves or adds to your thinking, and occasionally shows you that you have got it all wrong. This was particularly true on this occasion as our staff and partners in the Philippines are both real thinkers (one guy passed a long car ride by listening to a lecture on Hegel on his laptop ‘for fun’) and activists (more on that tomorrow). The quality of discussions in a Manila seminar on active citizenship and food justice was truly impressive – nuanced and open minded, with no sign of the dogmatic, fissiparous Left I saw on my last visit in 1998 (when I had to give the same lecture twice because different fractions refused to sit in the same room). First some (relatively minor) new insights from all these interactions:

Being indirect sometimes gets closer to the truth: New work on indirect elicitation surveys

Jed Friedman's picture

Often in IE (and in social research more generally) the researcher wishes to know respondent views or information regarded as highly sensitive and hence difficult to directly elicit through survey. There are numerous examples of this sensitive information – sexual history especially as it relates to risky or taboo practices, violence in the home, and political or religious views.


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