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October 2012

The Path to more Jobs in the Arab World starts with a dynamic private sector

Marc Schiffbauer's picture
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

An analysis of the quality of growth, and more specifically of the dynamics of the private sector is necessary to understand a region’s underperformance in job creation. While many countries in the Middle East and North Africa region had periods of solid growth over the past decade, they all underperformed in job creation. This is because the quality of growth matters as much as the quantity.

Connecting Wagons: Why and How to Help Lagging Regions Catch Up

Otaviano Canuto's picture

If it weren't for the economic performance of China, Brazil and other emerging markets, the global economic slump following the 2008 financial crisis would have been much worse. Not by chance, prospects for the global economy became gloomier this year when those economies showed signs of decreasing resilience against the downward pull from advanced countries.

Continuing the fight against poverty … beyond 2015

Jos Verbeek's picture

Last week I was fortunate to attend the World Bank-IMF annual meetings in Tokyo. The main purpose of my visit was to ensure the smooth functioning of a seminar on the ’Next Generation of MDGs’ and the post-2015 global development framework. I hope many of you watched the discussion, which was live web streamed. For those who missed the discussion by the high level panel, moderated by the World Bank’s brand new Chief Economist, Kaushik Basu, watch it here.

The panel consisted of an impressive group of people: President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf of Liberia; Helen Clark, Administrator of the UNDP, Gunilla Carlsson, Minister for international Development Cooperation, Sweden; Miguel Castilla, Minister of Economy and Finance, Peru; and Emerging Markets’ just-crowned Minister of Finance of the Year, Akihiko Tanaka, President of the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA);  our co-host, Homi Kharas of the Brookings Institute and Dr. Jim Kim,  President of the World Bank, who got caught up in meetings and was unable to be there the whole time. 

Remembering Raul

Dilip Ratha's picture

Raul Hernandez-CossSeveral weeks have already passed, yet it is still impossible to imagine that we lost our dearest colleague and friend, Raul Hernandez-Coss. Raul’s death was too sudden. He was too young, too energetic to leave so early. He was too passionate to rest the work on financial inclusion and remittances behind him.
 
He was on official travel (on behalf of the government of Mexico) in Bogota, staying at the Hilton, when he developed a headache; he asked the hotel for a doctor, but none was around; he called for emergency help, but the ambulance took two hours to arrive; too late.

Cost-Effective Conservation

Rachel Kyte's picture

También disponible en español

The success of the Amazon Region Protected Areas Program (ARPA) drew a crowd here in Hyderabad at the UN Convention on Biological Diversity meeting. This effort by the government of Brazil – supported by the World Bank, the Global Environment Facility, WWF, and the German Development Bank (KfW) – is protecting almost 60 million hectares of rainforest, an area roughly the size of France and Belgium combined.

Speakers from the governments of Brazil and Germany, as well as from the GEF and foundations, all agreed that ARPA’s results are impressive: Between 2004 and 2006, ARPA accounted for 37 percent of Brazil’s substantial decrease in deforestation, and the program’s first 13 new protected areas will save more than 430 million tons of CO2 emissions through 2050.

Sifting through data to detect deliberate misreporting in pay-for-performance schemes

Jed Friedman's picture

As empiricists, we spend a lot of time worrying about the accuracy of economic and socio-behavioral measurement. We want our data to reflect the targeted underlying truth. Unfortunately misreporting, either accidental or deliberate, from study subjects is a constant risk. The deliberate kind of misreporting is much more difficult to deal with because it is driven by complicated and unobserved respondent intentions – either to hide sensitive information or to try to please the perceived intentions of the interviewer. Respondents who misreport information for their own benefit are said to be “gaming”, and the challenge of gaming extends beyond research activities to development programs that depend on the accuracy of self-reported information for success.

CycLOUvia — creatively returning the streets to the people

Debra Lam's picture

CycLOUvia Street SceneBardstown Road is one of the busiest streets in Louisville, Kentucky. It is lined with restaurants, shops, and bars, and often filled with traffic. But this past Sunday for four hours, three miles of the road was closed to cars. Instead, pedestrians and cyclists hit the streets in a free, public event called CycLOUvia. CycLOUvia invited residents to “human-powered Bardstown Road,” advocating, “life at five miles per hour can be much more of a rush than speeding along at 35 miles per hour”. The event was part of Kentucky’s 2nd Sunday Open Streets (2S) initiative as a response to the state’s high obesity rates and designed to encourage communities to engage in more forms of physical activity in the urban space.

Is Pakistan’s microfinance sector serving women entrepreneurs?

The idea for looking into the issue of microfinance outreach to women in Pakistan had been of interest to the World Bank for some time.  Outreach of the microfinance sector to women borrowers had always been extremely low – hovering between 50 to 60 percent of borrowers.  Compared to the rest of the region, where we see outreach to women in the 90 percent range in India, Bangladesh, and Nepal, it raised the question as to why similar targets could not be achieved in Pakistan.   We reviewed a number of  possible explanations, but none of them seemed satisfactory.  On top of that, Pakistan is probably one of the most progressive microfinance sectors in the World.  The central bank has developed the most enabling regulations possible, Pakistan continues to top the Economist Intelligence Unit  list of the most enabling regulatory environment, innovations in branchless banking and new modes of financial service delivery are being incubated here, and the microfinance network in Pakistan continues to be regarded as world class.  So, given all the positive attributes around the sector, why was it not possible to more effectively reach this important constituency? 

Mobile Apps for Health, Jobs and Poverty Data

Leila Rafei's picture

If open data is the key to unlocking knowledge and information, then our free, new mobile apps knock down the door.

Family of data, family of apps

The DataFinder apps for iOS and Android use an intuitive interface to present the Bank’s open data for you to explore, analyze and share directly from your smartphone or tablet. The first DataFinder app featured a general selection of data from the World Development Indicators, and today we have new apps focusing on Jobs, Health and Poverty Data. With these apps, you don’t need to be a statistician to navigate charts and maps of development data. 


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