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December 2012

Why Are Pakistani Students So Excited About Discussing ‘Open Defecation Free Status’?

Masroor Ahmad's picture

After 29 hours of working without break, followed by presentations and a tense six hour wait for results, Agam Saran excitedly announced on Facebook that his team was one of two winners of the Water and Sanitation Hackathon Pakistan.

The 21-year old student at COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, on a team with four friends, was one of 106 students, aged 21 to 26, who spent the December 1-2 weekend in Lahore, developing mobile and web based applications for water and sanitation utilities in Pakistan. They came from various universities across the country to participate in the Sanitation Hackathon 2012.

Egypt DM launch and roadshow!

Ehaab Abdou's picture

        Kim Eun Yeul

After several months of planning and consultations with our partners, which started in May 2011, the Egypt Development Marketplace (DM) was launched on November 8, 2012. As part of the outreach strategy, the Egypt DM team organized a series of information sessions in four of Upper Egypt’s major cities; Asyut, Qena, Aswan and Minya. The sessions were co-organized and co-hosted with Egypt DM partners International Labor Organization, Social Fund for Development, Sawiris Foundation, and others.

Inspired to Fight Poverty

Aleem Walji's picture

striking poverty

The rate of change in our world is accelerating and every day there’s a new innovation or  promising idea that springs up to provide hope for the "wicked" problems of our time. But development is complex and requires a sustained commitment to bold experimentation underpinned by a commitment to learn constantly. But learning does not happen in isolation. It happens through practice, through reflection, and through meaningful and sometimes unexpected exchanges with peers, practitioners, and colleagues from far flung places.

This is why I am really excited about a new online salon that we have unveiled at the World Bank. Striking Poverty aims to "shine a light and lend a megaphone" to innovations in development to help them percolate, surface, and be widely debated and discussed. The salon is designed to empower innovators by striking up interactive discussions and debate amongst a global community of stakeholders.

Doha: keeping hope alive - just

Rachel Kyte's picture

COP President Abdullah bin Hamad Al-Attiyah gavels through the decision text. Photo courtesy IISD

The UN climate conference in Doha this past week kept the fight to combat global warming alive – 194 countries agreed to extend the Kyoto Protocol and to put in place a new agreement by 2015. The extension avoids a major setback in climate negotiations, but it does not fully reflect the urgency of the problems facing the warming planet.

To understand the true scale of those problems, read the new report Turn Down the Heat: Why a 4°C Warmer World Must Be Avoided. Its review of the latest climate science provides a powerful snapshot of what the future could be and warns that the world is on path to a 4°C (7.2°F) warmer world by century’s end if we don’t take action.

The report was referenced repeatedly during COP 18 and is one of several reports helping to put science at the center of policy making.

As is often the case in large international conferences these days, the greatest signs of momentum in Qatar were not inside the negotiating rooms but in the meeting halls where the informal process was underway. The World Bank played a key role in several agreements that will form a part of our ongoing commitment to step up to the climate challenge.

Working Coalitions

Increasingly like-minded coalitions are forming, across dividing lines of developed and developing countries, public, private sectors and civil society, in order to get on with the business of emissions reductions. One highlight of the conference was the meeting of the Climate and Clean Air Coalition, a remarkable group of countries united to reduce SLCPs, short-lived climate pollutants - methane, HFCs, black carbon.

Why ‘Why Nations Fail’ Fails (Mostly): Review of Acemoglu and Robinson - 2012's Big Development Book

Duncan Green's picture

Every now and then, a ‘Big Book on Development’ comes along that triggers a storm of arguments in my head (it’s a rather disturbing experience). One such is Why Nations Fail, by Daron Acemoglu (MIT) and James Robinson (Harvard). Judging by the proliferation of reviews and debates the book has provoked, my experience is widely shared.

First, what does the book say?

‘The focus of our book is on explaining world inequality’, which is essentially a phenomenon of the last 200 years (certainly at its current extreme levels) – the average income of a conquistador was only about twice that of a citizen of the Inca empire.

Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?

Maya Brahmam's picture

This week, the Financial Times reported that Jacob Rothschild bought into a peer-to-peer lending (P2P) company, Zopa, which allows people to lend to each other directly over the Internet. The Lending Club, a US-based P2P company, has processed more than $1 billion in loans and is preparing for an initial public offering.

Why has this sort of lending taken off? According to Rothschild, “Savers are looking for a way to get enhanced yield and at the same time, borrowers are looking for options where banks aren’t lending.” A recent post on Bloomberg noted that “Lending online became popular in China after a tightening of bank credit in 2010 following two years of stimulus spending to fight the global financial crisis.” Furthermore, the total amount that circulates as loans among friends, families and companies is $1.3 trillion – an amount equal to last year’s US budget deficit.

When Business Gets Personal: How Laws Affect Women's Economic Opportunities

Yasmin Bin-Humam's picture

12-12-12 marks an auspicious day on which couples are rushing to get married. Globally, many women and men have been waiting for this day to mark as the day they got married. Those who miss it will need to wait 100 years to have another chance like this one again. But depending on where in the world they are, getting married will mean different things for these women, their career and future business opportunities.

In many economies around the world women are legally prevented from conducting basic transactions which are necessary precursors to entrepreneurship and employment. Women, particularly married women, can be barred from actions such as opening bank accounts, determining where to work or live, and having the ability to move freely. In some economies married women need their husbands’ permission to carry out such actions.

“Oops! Did I just ruin this impact evaluation?” Top 5 of mistakes and how the new Impact Evaluation Toolkit can help.

Christel Vermeersch's picture

On October 3rd, I sent out a survey asking people what was the biggest, most embarrassing, dramatic, funny, or other oops mistake they made in an impact evaluation. Within a few hours, a former manager came into my office to warn me: “Christel, I tried this 10 years ago, and I got exactly two responses.” 

Better Jobs Boost Poverty Reduction

Gabriela Inchauste's picture

Man working at wood mill. Ecuador. Photo: © Edwin Huffman / EC011S07  World Bank

For the first time since the World Bank began monitoring progress against poverty, 2008 data indicate a decline in both the poverty rate and the number of poor in all six regions of the developing world. Moreover, within each region, poverty has fallen over the past decade in the vast majority of countries, whether one uses national or international poverty lines. This progress represents a substantial step in reaching the Millennium Development Goals, as by the latest estimate, this goal of halving absolute poverty by 2015 has already been reached. Even so, a great many people remain desperately poor and vulnerable across the world.