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September 2013

China's Answer to Job Creation

Joshua Wimpey's picture

About seven million college graduates are expected to flood the Chinese labor market this year. Seven . . . million . . . hopeful . . . graduates – all looking for work!
 
The Chinese central government, in response, has been actively pursuing policies that expand employment by supporting the growth of small and medium-size firms, as well as by promoting entrepreneurship among young graduates.

But have these policies been effective? How is China tackling the global challenge of job creation? And are there lessons other countries around the world can learn from China?

More on the “just give them cash” debate for small business growth

David McKenzie's picture
There has been a lot of recent debate and discussion about the role of cash grants in aid, and whether aid is more effective when simply given as unrestricted cash compared to approaches such as conditional transfers which try to restrict how recipients use any money received. Traditionally this debate has centered around food aid and education funding, but more recently this discussion has also arisen with respect to funding small businesses.

Percentages, Pauses and Politics (of Climate Change)

Rachel Kyte's picture

 Physical Science BasisWhen it comes to climate change, there has been a lot of talk the past few days about percentages (scientists who point to human causes), pauses (has warming slowed), and what it all means for policy and politics.

But, let’s be clear.

The latest report from the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change provides conclusive new scientific evidence that human activities are causing unprecedented changes in the Earth’s climate.

It buries the hatchet on “is it real” – the scientists say that it is extremely likely (95% probability) that most of the warming since 1950 has been due to human influence.

It pushes back on the skeptics’ claims that global warming stopped in 1998, and, most of important of all, it confirms that human activity, left unchecked, will further warm the Earth, with dramatic effects on weather, sea-levels and the Arctic.

This major international assessment of climate change, adopted Friday by the world’s governments, paints a blunt, clear picture of the scale of the problem before us.

Friday round up: Fighting extremism, Peru and health care, latest climate report, the Palma inequality measure, and Laos in space

LTD Editors's picture

Malaysia's Prime Minister is interviewed in New York earlier this week by Fareed Zakaria, explaining the Global Movement of Moderates that he set up to counter extremist ideology.

In "The BRICs Paradox: A Healthy Economy and Bad health Care," Eduardo Gomez writes in The Atlantic on how Peru is growing robustly yet still faltering in terms of health system reforms.

In the NYT's Dot Earth blog, Andrew Revkin describes how the IPCC's fifth report clarifies humanity's choices.

Prospects Daily: Concerns over US budget woes weigh on global equities, Eurozone economic confidence rises to 25-month high, Ghana’s GDP growth rebounds in the second quarter

Global Macroeconomics Team's picture
Financial Markets… Growing concerns over U.S. budget woes weighed on global equities on Friday, while Italy’s political turmoil and China’s growth concerns hit European and developing-country shares. The benchmark MSCI world equity index fell 0.2 percent in morning trade, but expected weakness in U.S. equities is likely to send the index further lower in afternoon session. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index dropped 0.3 percent and the MSCI Emerging Market Index lost 0.4%, trimming their monthly gains.

Energy, Emissions and Elevation: 6 Quick Climate Facts

Tim Herzog's picture
Today, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a major report that raises the panel’s certainty that human activity, particularly the burning of fossil fuels, is the cause of much of the warming seen in recent years. The World Bank recently updated its data on estimate carbon dioxide emissions along with many other climate relevant indicators in the World Development Indicators. Here are some interesting takeaways from the data:
 

The World's CO2 emissions grew 4.9% in 2010


That's the 3rd largest annual increase since 1990 (early estimates of 2011 and 2012 emissions show further global increases since 2010, but not quite as large). Nationally, China, the United States, India, Russia and Japan continue to be the top 5 emitters. It's also notable that in 2010 South Korea surpassed Canada in 8th place, and South Africa fell out of the top 10 with an emissions drop of almost 3 percent.

Algeria: Has the Moment of Diversification Finally Arrived?

Emmanuel Noubissie Ngankam's picture

Algeria: Has the Moment of Diversification Finally Arrived?

The socioeconomic challenges facing Algeria are many, the most urgent of which is without doubt youth unemployment. In a July 5 interview with the weekly, Jeune Afrique, Mr. Issad Rebrab, the CEO of Algeria’s leading private industrial group Cevital, ran through the raw facts: “Our unemployment rate is 10%, but youth unemployment is above 35%”. He added: “Algeria must move swiftly towards diversifying its economy and creating jobs.”


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