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September 2013

7 Things You May Not Know About Water

Tariq Khokhar's picture

1) Water covers 70% of the Earth, but it’s only 1/1000th of the Earth’s volume



This image from the US Geological Survey shows what would happen if all the Earth’s water - everything from oceans and seas to ice caps, lakes and atmospheric vapor - was removed from the surface and combined into a single sphere.

By volume, the Earth is about 1 trillion or 1,000 billion cubic kilometers. All of the earth’s water comes in at a thousand times smaller, in a sphere with a volume of 1.4 billion cubic kilometers and about 1,400 kilometers in diameter - that’s about the length of Madagascar.

Prospects Daily: Equities are up and yields are down as US jobs report disappoints, Mexico lowers interest rates

Global Macroeconomics Team's picture
Financial Markets…Equities are firmer and benchmark borrowing costs are pulling back sharply from two-year highs after a disappointing US jobs report reduces expectations for a shift in Federal Reserve policy. Wall Street’s S&P 500 is up 6 points to 1,660, while the dollar index is down 0.4%, helping to push gold up $15 to $1,382 an ounce. Europe’s Stoxx 600 equity index is up 0.5%, helping the FTSE All-World gain 0.5%.

World Bank Group President Jim Kim: Inside the G20

Jim Yong Kim's picture

The Group of 20 leaders met for an intense 24-hour period over two days, discussing the situation in Syria and the global economy. Watch this video blog to hear what World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim thought shouldn't be forgotten in these important discussions.

Mapping the Burden of Disease: Trends in Six Regions

Julia Ross's picture


Earlier this week, the World Bank health team joined the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) to launch six reports that provide a rich collection of data detailing the health landscape across six global regions.

The reports—an outcome of the Global Burden of Disease 2010 (GBD 2010) data set released last December by IHME—explore changes in the leading causes of premature mortality and disability in each region over 20 years, depicting risk factors and comparing the performance of countries in a range of health outcomes. Individually, they document how each region is working to reduce health loss from most communicable, newborn, nutritional, and maternal conditions and what new challenges lay ahead.
 

Of Runways and Playgrounds

Nora Weisskopf's picture
Touchdown on the runway at Funafuti Airport in Tuvalu. The ATR-42 that brought us here from Nadi in Fiji slowly rolls toward the apron and as we step off the plane we are greeted by what seems to be a Welcome Committee for the plane’s arrival. With only two flights a week, the excitement of airplanes landing and departing has clearly not worn off yet – from grandmothers to playing children, young men on

Samoa Diary

Kaushik Basu's picture

A discomfiting feature of going to places off the beaten track is the surprise shown by the natives themselves. I recall traveling to Dushanbe from Moscow by Somon Airways; the flight attendant--a young Tajik woman--on learning that I am an Indian living in Washington, looked puzzled and asked, enunciating each word, "Why, may I ask you, are you going to Tajikistan?" The slight sense of alarm caused by the query hinting at faulty decision making on my part was heightened by Aristomene Varoudakis, a gifted economist and one of my advisers at the World Bank, pronouncing, ten minutes into the flight: "So far, so good." Those words, meant to be comforting, were disquieting in their suggestion that this was a journey in which ten minutes without a mishap deserved a toast.

The same was true as I headed to Samoa. The flight was full of Samoans who could have walked out of a Paul Gauguin frieze, a few surfers and some missionaries. Jimmy Olazo and I from the World Bank did not fit into any of these categories and faced the inevitable interrogation on why we were going there. Samoa is indeed an unusual country to visit. It is impossibly small, with a population of less than 200,000. Its resources are meager, consisting of fish, some agricultural products and spectacular scenery. To an economist the viability of an economy like this is a conundrum. Where do you get the economies of scale from to produce your cars, hospitals, clothes? How much fish and tourism can you supply to the rest of the world to pay for these? Is it possible to help Samoans organize a steady flow of workers, skilled and unskilled, to other nations and rely on their remittances? How do you provide any insurance against the risks of natural disaster and calamity, a concern that, as I discovered over the next three days, dominated the lives of the Samoans? How do you conduct monetary policy in such an impossibly small nation?

Buenos Aires: How the Maldonado stream went back to its bed

Maria Madrid's picture
The case of the Maldonado stream: The voice of a citizen

Imagine a busy metropolitan avenue crossing the length of Buenos Aires, Argentina, transited daily by buses and trains and lined with a large hospital, medical buildings, schools, shops and businesses.

Now imagine for 27 years this avenue flooding severely 37 times as if it were a river. During a flood, envision people being evacuated in motorboats, cars practically floating downstream, and cars and pedestrians on the bridge above it having to remain stranded there until the waters on the avenue below receded. It sounds implausible doesn’t it? Not for Buenos Aires residents it didn’t. The Juan B. Justo Avenue was such a thoroughfare.

Friday links September 6, 2013: Cash, Scarcity, Justice, Taking your Kids to work (Development edition), and more…

David McKenzie's picture

Managing Water Across Boundaries

Mahmoud Mohieldin's picture
World Water Week 2013Most of the planet is covered in water, yet less than one percent of it is available for human use. Access to water and sanitation is a key component of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the emerging Post-2015 agenda. Water also directly contributes to goals of health, food security, biodiversity, energy, and peace and security.
 
Today at least 780 million people lack access to safe drinking water. Feeding a planet of nine billion people by 2050 will require approximately 50 percent more water in 2050.  These challenges are exacerbated by increasing scarcity of water, extreme weather due to climate change, and a rapidly growing population.
 
Responding to the global crisis in water requires a more deliberate approach to managing trans-boundary water. Forty percent of the world's population lives in international river basins, which account for 80% of global river flow.  Despite this and the proven benefits of cooperation, such as reduced chances of conflict, improved river sustainability, and access to external markets, 166 of the world’s 276 international basins have no treaty provisions covering them.  Moreover, many multilateral basins are subject to bilateral treaties that preclude participation by other riparian countries.

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