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September 2013

5 Reasons Why Just Building Toilets Won’t Improve Urban Sanitation

Peter Hawkins's picture

It’s widely reported that most of the world’s population lives in urban areas. UN-Habitat estimates that 40% of urban dwellers live in slums, and that number is growing by more than 20 million people per year. Perhaps, less commonly reported is that while population is growing rapidly, urban sanitation coverage has only increased slightly.
 
While toilet access is generally higher in urban areas as compared to rural, sanitary conditions in urban areas are aggravated by high-density living, inadequate septage and solid waste management, and poor drainage. Recent analysis by WSP concludes that to make any significant impact it is essential to adopt a multi-dimensional approach to this complex problem. Here are five reasons why urban sanitation is about more than building a toilet.

PPPs: Infrastructure Is in Demand, So Where Is the Investment?

Jordan Schwartz's picture

It should be celebration time for public-private partnerships and other forms of private investment in infrastructure.  The pent-up demand for infrastructure in the developing world has never been greater—over double the $900 billion per year being spent now, according to our rough estimates; and governments around the world are falling over themselves to show donors, strategic investors and creditors alike how committed they are to attracting private investment to infrastructure.

Private Investment in InfrastructureSomehow, as we release the 2012 data on private participation in infrastructure (PPI) across the developing world [see: PPI Database], I just can’t get myself to pop the champagne.  True, the march into higher levels of investment, uneven as it is, continues.  Commitments for PPI totaled $182 billion in 2012 and most developing countries clocked in with at least one private investment.  But the total is still less than 20 percent of what the developing world is spending on infrastructure, and less than 10 percent of what is needed to reach growth targets.  It is still less than one percent of GDP for developing countries.

If the demand is out there, what are all those investors scared of?

Targeting motorcycle users to improve traffic safety in Latin America

Anna Okola's picture


Motorcycle riders and passengers have long been vulnerable users of motorized transport. In the Americas, with the increasing ownership of motorcycles, given the ease and lower costs, this trend is worrisome as the number of vulnerable users as well as those impacted by traffic crashes increases, sometimes masking a shift from pedestrian or bicycle casualties to motorcycle victims. These trends would be similar in regions such as Africa which also share the motorcycle-taxi (mototaxi) phenomenon.

Jobs: Can Uganda secure the future for its youth?

Rachel K. Sebudde's picture



When Mukisa joined the 62nd Makerere University graduating class in January 2012, he had already made up his mind to walk a very different path from those who graduated from the same Kampala university 30 years ago. Back then, jobs were waiting for graduates, who joined formal employment that afforded them a decent living. Today, only 20% of new entrants onto the Ugandan labor market find formal jobs, leaving the rest to self-employment and other informal activities. So Mukisa started a business in plant nurseries to tap into the demand for gardening materials for the booming construction industry in the city. He has gradually acquired the technical and entrepreneur skills for his business, but wishes for better access to capital and land, and less harassment by local authorities, to expand his business.

Ascending the CSO Engagement Continuum II – Consultations

John Garrison's picture

The Bank has learned a good deal about how to consult civil society over the years. The absence of consultation policies led to some of the most visible CSO advocacy campaigns opposing Bank-financed projects, such as the Narmada Dam in India and the Polonoreste Project in the Brazilian Amazon in the 1980s. Thus, while this third step on the civil society engagement continuum has been one of the most difficult to ascend, it has also shown the clearest progress in terms of more effective consultation practices.  As the latest edition of the World Bank–Civil Society Engagement Review of Fiscal Years 2010–12 demonstrates, today the Bank consults CSOs widely on its strategies, policies, programs, and projects worldwide.   

 

Awakening Indonesia’s Golden Generation: Extending Compulsory Education from 9 to 12 Years

Samer Al-Samarrai's picture
Tersedia dalam Bahasa Indonesia

Recently, the Indonesian Minister of Education and Culture announced the start of a program to extend the length of compulsory education from 9 to 12 years. Behind this announcement lies a desire to maximize the benefits of the country’s demographic dividend.

Reducing Methane with Innovative Finance

Brice Jean Marie Quesnel's picture

 Curt Carnemark/World Bank

One key to addressing climate change is attracting private capital to finance low-carbon sustainable development.   For 2013, the World Bank estimates over US$1 trillion will flow to developing countries from private sources.  In order to increase capital flows to finance low-carbon investment, many forms of innovation are needed.  One source of innovation could come in the shape of results-based finance (RBF).   RBF, also known as pay-for-performance, was pioneered in the health sector and serves as the backbone of anticipated payments for protecting forests. It is increasingly being considered as a means for financing the adoption of low-carbon development pathways and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions abatement. RBF provides payments for success, and only upon the delivery of pre-defined, verified results.

To see how such a results-based approach to mobilizing private sector funding could work in methane reduction, the World Bank convened - at the request of the G8 - a dedicated study group which looked at the role that pay-for-performance mechanisms could play. The resulting report from the methane finance study group found that, when implemented, pay-for-performance provided by a credit-worthy third party can be a powerful catalyst for private investment. There is potentially much wider scope for the use of pay-for-performance mechanism in climate finance for its deployment to target other GHGs in addition to methane.

Nigeria is recruiting financial advisers for a $100 mn diaspora bond

Dilip Ratha's picture

The Financial Times on August 28th carried Nigeria’s request for proposal for potential financial advisers for a $100 million diaspora bond. To my knowledge, after Israel, this is the first diaspora bond being implemented the right way: it would be registered with the US SEC. In a smart move, Nigeria also wants to recruit an international bank and a Nigerian bank as financial advisers, which would enhance the credibility of the bond to Nigerians living abroad. And by setting a low target of $100 million – for comparison, Nigeria received over $20 billion in remittances in 2012 – it is almost certain that the bond would be oversubscribed. A separate report from the Reuters mentions that the bond would have a maturity of 5 years and offer a coupon of around 350 basis points above comparable US Treasury. At that high rate, the bond would be hugely attractive for Nigerian individuals who are getting close to nothing on their overseas bank deposits.

Five Myths about the Business of Sanitation

Jemima Sy's picture

A recent study by the Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) and International Finance Corporation (IFC) of the World Bank surveyed over 100 firms providing on-site sanitation services to the base of the pyramid in four countries (Bangladesh, Indonesia, Peru and Tanzania) and debunked widely held beliefs on the motivations and potential of firms in the growing sanitation market.


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