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March 2014

Friday Roundup: Chronic poverty, remittances, debating inequality, water worries and agriculture, and gender in Africa

LTD Editors's picture

A report by ODI, "The Chronic Poverty Report 2014-2015:The Road to Zero Extreme Poverty," provides an impoverishment index to help countries determine which priorities will pull their citizens out of poverty.

'Remittances and Vulnerability in Developing Countries,' a new World Bank Policy Research Working Paper by Giulia Bettin, Andrea F. Presbitero, and Nikola Spatafora, examines how international remittances are affected by structural characteristics, macroeconomic conditions, and adverse shocks in both source and recipient economies.

Building pro-growth coalition for reforms: The Caribbean Growth Forum

Andrea Gallina's picture

Nighttime in St George's, Grenada

What does it take to make reforms work in small island countries?

At the end of June 2013, twelve Caribbean countries presented a roadmap for growth in three areas -logistics and connectivity, investment climate, skills and productivity- to a broad audience of private sector representatives, international development institutions, regional organization, civil society and media. That event culminated a 7-month long phase during which policy-making was not the result of close-doors meetings, but a process of intense negotiation, consultations, and consensus building among all actors of each Caribbean country’s societies. All of which was documented in real time and in a transparent fashion by each government. Yes, business was not “business as usual”.
 
Reforms priorities were agreed and a calendar for implementation brushed on a power point slide in the wonderful framework of five stars Bahamian hotel…After the workshop lights, projects and microphones shut down, many of us went home with a familiar sound in our ears: and now what? Was it another “talkshop”?

More crop per drop in the Middle East and North Africa

Inger Andersen's picture
Interview
Water is a scarce commodity: we should take care of it.

In the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region there is really very little choice. The region only receives about two percent of the world’s annual precipitation and holds about 1.2 percent of the world’s renewable water resources. This makes water a deeply precious and scarce resource.  The statistics are stark: The amount of water consumed in the United States averages 2,800 cubic meters per person per year, whereas in Yemen, it is 100 cubic meters per person. 
 

Food Waste -- a Bigger Problem Than You Thought

Jim Yong Kim's picture



Here's a shameful statistic: up to a third of the world's food is wasted. In the developing world, that's 400 to 500 calories per person per day. But in the developed world, it's as much as 1,500 calories per person.

We cannot afford to waste that much food. About 842 million people today don't get enough to eat, and 98 percent of them live in developing countries.

In developing countries, food is lost on farms or on the way to market due to poor infrastructure and storage. In developed countries, food is wasted at the retail level and by consumers.

All of us have to take action. Every country -- and every person -- needs to minimize food waste as a part of the fight against poverty and hunger.

Global Health Weekly Links: March 21, 2014

Julia Ross's picture
Our Global Health Links this week highlight content for World Water Day (Mar 22) and World Tuberculosis Day (Mar 24).

Each Friday, we share a selection of global health Tweets, infographics, stories, blog posts, videos and other content of note. For more, follow us @worldbankhealth.
 
Global Health Weekly Links: March 21, 2014

Mar 21, 2014: This Week in #SouthAsiaDev

Liana Pistell's picture
We've rounded up 30 tweets, posts, links, and +1's on South Asia-related development news, innovation, and social good that caught our eye this week. Countries included: Afghanistan, Bangladesh ,India, Nepal, and Pakistan. For regular #SouthAsiaDev updates, follow us on Facebook and Twitter

A Day with Brazil’s Innovative Bolsa Familia Program

Mohamad Al-Arief's picture
Field Visit to Escola Municipal Almirante Tamandare, Vidigal, Brazil

This week I’ve been participating in the World Bank’s South-South Learning Forum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where policymakers from 70 countries are sharing their experiences and discussing practical solutions for successful social protection programs.

Seeking Your Views: How Can Citizens Contribute to Better Development Outcomes?

Johanna Martinsson's picture

The World Bank Group is developing a framework to more systematically mainstream citizen engagement in Bank Group-supported operations with the goal of improving their results. The framework will build on experience from existing efforts and highlight additional context-specific opportunities to engage with citizens and seek beneficiary feedback.

The Bank would like to learn from the wealth of global experience in citizen engagement. Specifically, what works, when, why and how? Please share your experience through this short online survey. The team working on this would very much appreciate your input, which will help inform the framework.

For more information, visit the consultations website. If you have any questions, please send an e-mail to citizenengagement@worldbankgroup.org

 


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