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Québec earmarks carbon-market revenues to stir innovation

David Heurtel's picture



Poco tiempo después de ingresar al Banco Mundial, trabajé en un equipo que evaluaba la magnitud y la gravedad de la degradación de la tierra en El Salvador. Como parte de este trabajo, fui a visitar el sitio de un proyecto de conservación de suelos que se había implementado unos años antes y que se consideraba extremadamente exitoso. De hecho, el informe de implementación del proyecto estaba lleno de cifras de kilómetros lineales de terrazas construidas, y otros indicadores de éxito. Sin embargo, una vez que llegamos al sitio del proyecto, buscamos en vano cualquier signo de una terraza. Las terrazas habían estado una vez allí (¡había fotografías para demostrarlo!), pero unos años más tarde ya no existían.

Que los resultados de un proyecto no duren una vez que el proyecto termine es una preocupación constante. Sin embargo, es difícil saber que tan importante es el problema, ya que muy pocas veces hay monitoreo después de que un proyecto cierra.

As the Paris Agreement becomes reality: How to transform economies through carbon pricing

Laura Tuck's picture


The remarkable pace at which nations of the world have ratified the Paris Agreement on climate change gives us all hope. It signals the world is ready to take the actions we need to keep global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius. We know, however, that delivering on Paris comes with a high price tag, and that we need to help countries not just transition toward renewable energy but unlock the finance needed to get there.

Amid the enormous challenge ahead, I want to emphasize the transformative economic opportunity that putting a price on carbon pollution presents.

Reasons for optimism in closing the infrastructure financing gap

Jason Zhengrong Lu's picture
Que fait le Groupe de la Banque mondiale pour aider l'Inde à résoudre ses problèmes de développement ? Et où en sont ses programmes mis en œuvre dans les États indiens les plus pauvres ? Voilà quelques-unes des questions auxquelles répond Open India (openindia.worldbankgroup.org [a]), une nouvelle application Web qui présente la stratégie de partenariat (a) du Groupe de la Banque mondiale avec l’Inde ainsi que ses projets opérationnels et ses travaux de recherche dans ce pays.
 
En quoi le site Open India est-il unique ?
La nouveauté de cette application réside dans le développement d’une plateforme transparente, interactive et simple à utiliser pour présenter la stratégie de partenariat du Groupe de la Banque mondiale avec l’Inde et ses projets en cours dans le pays. Elle offre des fonctionnalités de visualisation des données qui relient les trois principaux domaines d’intervention stratégique (intégration économique, transformation spatiale et inclusion sociale) aux problématiques sur lesquelles portent les opérations et les travaux de recherche du Groupe en Inde. Open India repose notamment sur la visualisation de données statistiques sectorielles qui quantifient les problèmes de développement auxquels l'Inde est confrontée. Par exemple, la représentation graphique présentée ci-dessous illustre l'ensemble des lacunes du pays en matière d'infrastructures et de transports.
 

Source: Open India (a)
 

Your air conditioner is making you cooler, and the world warmer. We can change that.

Karin Shepardson's picture

Last week, the World Bank's Europe & Central Asia region published Diversified Development, a highly readable report written by Indermitt Gill, Ivailo Izvorski, Willem van Eeghen, and Donato De Rosa. The subtitle, making the most of natural resources in Eurasia, indicates that the report focuses on countries that are currently highly specialized as a result of their comparative advantage in natural resources. It addresses the question to what extent these countries have to diversify to ensure long-term prosperity. Clearer than ever before, the authors show that that is the wrong question to ask. That question gets the causality backwards. A diversified economy can result from successful development, but forced diversification is unlikely to lead to successful development.

Free, French course on PPPs offers customized case studies, relevant regional perspectives

Olivier Fremond's picture
Free, French course on PPPs



As a former country manager in Benin, my team and I advised the national administration on the Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) Project Law then under consideration and engaged in PPPs. This effort took place after the private sector, both domestic and international, made a strong commitment to finance large infrastructure programs. Timing is everything, of course, and the window for passing the legislation through parliament before legislative elections was tight – ultimately, too tight. A better understanding of PPPs and the options these partnerships can offer to a country like Benin, which needs substantial infrastructure investments, would have helped the process tremendously.

At the time, however, PPP educational options for French speakers were scarce. Although plenty of PPP resources exist in English, many fewer tools are available for Francophone African countries. These tools are critical to understanding PPPs, creating and adopting legislation, applying PPPs when they may serve a need, and knowing when not to use them to secure infrastructure services.

How public-private partnerships can play a constructive role in global economies in 2016

Geoffrey Keele's picture

When Jane Goodall spoke Tuesday at the World Bank, she said she had recently begun to understand the exciting potential value of REDD – reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. For decades, Dr. Goodall and others have been fighting for the conservation of forests to preserve and protect animal habitat– in the case of Dr. Goodall, that of chimpanzees in Tanzania. And now, many people like Jane Goodall are making the connection between this battle and the fight against climate change.
By granting greater value to trees that are alive and standing rather than cut down, and making payments to reduce emissions by preserving forests, not only does the climate benefit but biodiversity is also protected, including species that are under the threat of extinction.

In her talk to staff, Dr. Goodall spoke about her shock when she discovered the extent of deforestation surrounding the national park in Tanzania in which her famous study of chimpanzees has taken place over the past 50 years.“It was in early 1990 that I flew over the Gombe National Park – it’s tiny, it’s only 30 square miles, but we flew over all the land around it and it was absolutely horrifying to me to see that, yes, I knew there was deforestation outside the park but I had not realized it was total deforestation“, said Dr. Goodall .

REDD provides a new opportunity to scale up initiatives like those of Jane Goodall to the national level, raises the profile of conservation work, and potentially creates new sources of funding for forest protection. But REDD also has a lot to gain from Dr. Goodall’s experience and wisdom. She is arguably the greatest ambassador for wildlife and forest conversation in the world today. Now she squeezes the annual UN conferences into her astounding, 300-day-a-year travel schedule. Anywhere she goes, she greets audiences with the call of the chimpanzee, and proceeds to make a compelling case about what REDD could be on the ground – forest protection, stewardship of flagship species, but also socio-economic development (the Jane Goodall Institute funds myriad projects aimed at improving communities’ well-being).

How to bring discussion about financial issues into the classroom

Ivor Beazley's picture

When considering public-private partnerships (PPPs), the million- (or even billion-) dollar question is: What is the single most relevant factor that drives PPP projects to failure?

Photo: flickr/Milton Jung
As a governmental officer, managing PPP transactions for many years, and later as a consultant on the private side of transactions, I have led more than 40 PPP initiatives. Many succeeded and are delivering Value for Money for users and taxpayers. However, several others failed along the way, and contracts never got signed. What surprises me is that failure came even to some technically perfect projects.

Every successful PPP with which I’ve been involved shared one important factor: effective governance in the project level, from the identification of the project, all the way to the tender process.

By governance I mean the set of processes that allows decisions to be made by the right people, with access to the right information, at the right time, so the project can meet the requirements defined by the project’s stakeholders.

Appointing a gender equal cabinet is good for Canada – but not for the reason you think

Florence Kondylis's picture

Also available in: Français

Recently, Canada’s newly elected Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, appointed a cabinet that is 50% female. Explaining the choice, Trudeau stated that it was important “to present to Canada a cabinet that looks like Canada” – and “because it’s 2015.”

The announcement has been greeted with considerable backlash in the press, with some news outlets going as far as to imply that promoting diversity is not good for governance. This view implies an either or – that appointing women and incorporating gender balance, while good for the country’s diversity, would undermine the quality of governance. One could probably name many male candidates who on paper look more accomplished than some of Trudeau’s appointees.

Natural Capital Accounting: Going beyond the numbers

Stig Johansson's picture
Guatemala. World Bank

Here are some facts that you might not know: Do these numbers just seem like bits of trivia? In fact, these are all important results that came out of natural capital accounting (NCA) – a system for generating data on natural resources, such as forests, energy and water, which are not included in traditional statistics. NCA follows standards approved by the United Nations to ensure trust, consistency and comparison across time and countries.
 
The results above are among the numerous NCA findings that are being generated every year, with support from a World Bank-led global partnership called Wealth Accounting and the Valuation of Ecosystem Services (WAVES). In response to the growing appetite for information on NCA, WAVES has set up a new Knowledge Center bringing together resources on this topic.

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