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Prospects Weekly: First trade data released for September are not promising

Global Macroeconomics Team's picture
First trade data released for September are not promising, with most countries reporting lower import volumes, suggesting that the risk of a worldwide deceleration in demand is real. Meanwhile with all three major rating agencies downgrading Spain’s long-term sovereign debt rating in the past few days, the sovereign credit quality-gap between developing and developed countries continued to narrow.

Prospects Daily: President Obama proposes $450 billiion in jobs stimulus

Global Macroeconomics Team's picture

Important developments today:

1. Credit risk for European sovereigns, and commercial bank debt rises to fresh highs

2. European equity markets showed a certain degree of apathy to the plan announced by Mr. Obama last evening

 

Can the Private Sector Play a Helpful Role in Education? It Can, If it Targets Disadvantaged Students

Harry A. Patrinos's picture

The following piece appeared as a guest blog in the UK's Guardian this past week.

Students from Harlem Childrens' Zone with its president, Geoffrey Canada. A good public education system means public spending – but not necessarily public provision.

In OECD countries, more than 20% of public education expenditure goes to private institutions – communities, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), faith-based organisations, trade unions, private companies, small informal providers and individual practitioners – and about 12% is spent on privately-managed institutions.

But does private participation mean higher quality education? Does it bring better exam results? Can it encourage greater equality?

Prospects Weekly: European heads of state agreed on financial package for Greece today

Global Macroeconomics Team's picture

European heads of state agreed on a €109 bn second financial package for Greece today. About one-third of the financing will be covered by debt swaps or rollovers by private bondholders. Aside from improving the terms of existing multilateral loans, the leaders also agreed to expand the European Financial Stability Facility’s mandate, including authority to buy bonds on the secondary market.

After Japan’s earthquake: what changed?

Kyoko Takahashi's picture

March 11, 2011. This day became an unforgettable day for Japanese people. A massive earthquake and tsunami left more than 15,000 people dead, and over 7,000 people are still missing (as of June 24, 2011).

Since my hometown is in Miyagi prefecture, the area most affected by the disaster, I went back to my hometown and decided to help as a volunteer.

Flattening innovation

Michael Oluwagbemi's picture

The subject of innovation is slowly but surely on the rise; as nations realizing the steady shift from resource to the inevitable knowledge based global economy demand high speed innovation to stay ahead of the competition. From Japan to Colombia, Washington DC to Bulawayo - politicians are emphasizing retooling education for innovation.


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