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Uganda

Exploring youth’s role and engagement in African rural economies

Jerome Bossuet's picture
A boy at work in a maize field, Ethiopia.  Photo credit: C. Robinson/CIMMYT

How do young rural Africans engage in the rural economy? How important is farming relative to non-farm activities and the income of young rural Africans? What social, spatial and policy factors explain different patterns of engagement? These questions are at the heart of an interdisciplinary research project, funded by IFAD, that seeks to provide a stronger evidence base for policy and for the growing number of programs in Africa that want to “invest in youth.”

One component of the Challenges and Opportunities for Rural Youth Employment in Sub-Saharan Africa project, led by the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), exploits data from the Living Standard Measurement Study - Integrated Surveys on Agriculture (LSMS-ISA) to develop a more detailed picture of young people’s economic activities. These household survey data cover eight countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, are taken at regular intervals, and in most cases follow the same households and individuals through time. While the LSMS-ISA are not specialized youth surveys and therefore may not cover all facets of youth livelihoods and wellbeing in detail, they provide valuable knowledge about the evolving patterns of social and economic characteristics of rural African youth and their households.

Introducing #Blog4Dev’s 2019 youth winners and their solutions to closing Africa’s digital divide

Hafez Ghanem's picture


Last October, I participated in End Poverty Day (EPD)  from the Zambia Country Office, where I had the opportunity to exchange with a host of young brilliant minds from Zambia and around the continent. It left me full of energy and a renewed sense of hope for Africa. Since then, I have made it a point to speak to youth on every country visit, most recently meeting with young techpreneurs in Ghana, Côte d’Ivoire, and Senegal. I can’t help but think to myself after every meeting, what phenomenal potential these young people represent for Africa! 

Reducing intimate partner violence through edutainment

Markus Goldstein's picture
When I started working on HIV, behavior change campaigns were quite in vogue.   The idea was if you bombarded folks with enough information, maybe even made them watch a movie or two, they would get the message and change their behavior.   Then some folks got creative and thought about adding community theater or radio plays to the mix as maybe a way to get the messages across in a more entertaining way.  
 

How can we use analytical approaches to generate urban climate investments in Africa?

Prashant Kapoor's picture
As the world rushes to reduce the negative impacts of climate change, ambitious sub-national actors are rising to the fore. The recent One Planet Summit exemplifies this trend. Earlier this month, urban leaders joined CEOs, financial institutions, researchers, Heads of State, and more in the adoption of the Africa Pledge, calling for immediate voluntary actions and a specific commitment to invest in sustainable infrastructure across the continent. After all, the infrastructure investments we make today set the agenda for how cities will grow in the future.

For example, Sub-Saharan Africa is largely rural, but is also the region with the fastest urbanization rates. Currently, almost 40 percent of the people live in cities in Sub-Saharan Africa, but this is expected to grow to 60 percent or more by 2050. So while urbanization provides economic and social opportunity, it can overburden traditional municipal resource and service delivery approaches.
 
Figure 1: Urban and Rural Population Growth Rate - excluding high income countries (Source: World Development Indicators)

Legal initiatives for refugees in Uganda

Colman Ntungwerisho's picture
Children make up more than half of the refugee population in Uganda. Photo: Jay Hsu, flickr


According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the refugee population in Uganda is estimated at 1.15 million people. This makes Uganda one of the largest refugee-hosting countries in the world. South Sudan alone is the source of more than one million refugees, with 86% of these comprised of women and children. They occupy settlements in rural districts in Northern Uganda such as Adjumani, Moyo and Arua. It is also the home to one of the world’s biggest refugee camp, Bidi Bidi, which hosts a quarter of a million refugees.

An effective legal and referral system is critical to addressing gender-based violence

Margarita Puerto Gómez's picture
Nkingo Girls’ Club members enjoy each other’s company after their weekly meeting to discuss reproductive health and receive life skills and leadership training. Photo: World Bank/Globe Video

For the World Bank’s partner governments, investing in roads and other infrastructure development is critical to driving growth and reducing poverty. At the same time, adverse social impacts can occur if social risks are not properly assessed, mitigated and managed. In particular, projects that involve large labor influxes—such as road construction projects in rural areas—can contribute to an increased risk of gender-based violence in the local community, including sexual exploitation and abuse of women and adolescent girls.

Scaling up innovations in agriculture: Lessons from Africa

Simeon Ehui's picture
The West Africa Agricultural Productivity Program is building a sustainable and nutritious food system in Nigeria that creates jobs for youth. Photo: Dasan Bobo/World Bank

For too long the narrative surrounding Africa’s agri-food sector has been one of limited opportunity, flat yields and small farms. It’s true that Africa is still producing too little food and value-added products despite recent efforts to increase investment, and that agricultural productivity has been broadly stagnant since the 1980s as shown in the 2018 African Agriculture Status Report.

Teach: Tackling the learning crisis, one classroom at a time

Ezequiel Molina's picture
Also available in: French | Español | Portuguese | Arabic
 



Despite tremendous progress in getting children into the classroom, we are experiencing a global learning crisis, where a large share of children complete primary school lacking even basic reading, writing, and arithmetic skillsWhat explains this phenomenon? To answer this question, consider the following examples of classrooms that are unlikely to put students on a path to success. 

How do Africans’ priorities align with the SDGs and government performance? New results from Afrobarometer



One of the challenges presented by the ambitious Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) laid out in the UN 2030 Agenda is where to begin.

Afrobarometer, which conducts public attitude surveys in more than 30 African countries, argues that one critical place to start is by asking the people.


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