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Should people be paid to apply for jobs? Guest post by Stefano Caria

This is the sixth in this year’s job market series 
                                                                          
Labor misallocation is believed to be a key driver of differences in income across countries (Hsieh and Klenow 2010). However, the causes of this misallocation are not always well understood and there is little evidence on what interventions can improve the allocation of workers in the economy. These issues are particularly important in Sub-Saharan Africa, where worker mobility from low to high productivity sectors is often limited (McMillan, Rodrick and Verduzco-Gallo 2014).
 
My job market paper provides new experimental evidence from Ethiopia showing that subsidizing job applications can reduce inefficiencies in the allocation of workers’ talent.

The Impact of Vocational Training for Young Women in Delhi

David McKenzie's picture



In the sustainable development goals (SDGs) era, the imperative to finance the development agenda from domestic resources has been amplified. Irrespective of a government’s best intentions to achieve universal health coverage (UHC), without adequate financing from its national budget, minimal progress will be made. This is in stark contrast to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) era (from 2000- 2015) where emphasis was on effective development cooperation (EDC).  And when it comes to achieving UHC, financing is actually only part of the role ministries of finance can play. Indeed, in a recent Lancet article, H.E Taro Aso, Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister of Japan, pointed out that the finance ministry’s “crucial role in Japan’s UHC achievement has not been adequately highlighted”.

The Results are in! Did our blog readers do better than our seminar audiences at predicting the impacts of a jobs program?

David McKenzie's picture
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Enfants de Koutoukalé, au Niger.

Vous êtes-vous déjà demandé si votre lieu de naissance avait une influence sur vos chances de réussite dans la vie ? Si une naissance est déjà un petit miracle en soi, un être humain sur dix seulement naît dans la relative sécurité d’un pays à revenu élevé. Imaginez que vous soyez né au Niger ou en République démocratique du Congo (RDC)… Avant même de savoir marcher ou parler, votre vie sera un véritable parcours du combattant. Parce qu’en dépit des progrès, les enfants nés dans ces deux pays ont vingt fois plus de risques de mourir avant leur cinquième anniversaire que ceux nés dans l’Union européenne — et pratiquement dix fois plus que les petits Chinois.

Are our blog readers better predictors of impact results than seminar audiences? Evaluating programs to get young women to work

David McKenzie's picture


Over the last two weeks, we’ve witnessed three hurricanes in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico as well as a magnitude 8.1 earthquake in Mexico, killing people and destroying homes. They serve as a reminder that natural hazards pose a greater threat to our lives and livelihoods than we may think.

Dealing with rising disaster risks requires greater efforts with smarter approaches—ones that can help vulnerable people and communities better prepare for, and recover from, disasters. Libraries Without Borders (BSF), an international organization that expands access to information, education, and cultural resources to vulnerable people around the world, knows that very well.

In 2010, BSF was building libraries in Haiti when the well-known earthquake struck. At the time, local partners asked BSF to help them create information and cultural access points in refugee camps. This experience led to the development of the “Ideas Box," an innovative tool that provides vulnerable communities in disaster-prone areas with access to information, education, and cultural resources.

Last week, on the International Literacy Day, I talked to BSF’s Director of Communications and Advocacy, Katherine Trujillo, about the Ideas Box, as well as how their innovative ideas and actions have helped promote literacy and build resilience in disaster-hit communities.