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aspirations

Weekly wire: The global forum

Roxanne Bauer's picture

These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.

Is Life Better Now Than 50 Years Ago? The Answer May Depend On The Economy

National Public Radio, USA
The way people perceive their country's economic conditions plays a big role in whether they view their lives more positively now compared with the past, according to a study released Tuesday by the Pew Research Center. Of the nearly 43,000 people surveyed in 38 countries in Asia, Europe, the Middle East, Africa and North and South America, Vietnam had the most positive self-assessment: Eighty-eight percent of respondents said life is better today in their country than it was a half-century ago.
 
The Conversation
Improved human well-being is one of the modern era’s greatest triumphs. The age of plenty has also led to an unexpected global health crisis: two billion people are either overweight or obese. Developed countries have been especially susceptible to unhealthy weight gain, a trend that could be considered the price of abundance. However, developing countries are now facing a similar crisis.
 

Business training that goes better with friends

Markus Goldstein's picture
 CIP
Variedades nativas de papa, que solían consumirse solo en la sierra, actualmente se sirven en los mejores restaurantes de Lima y se exportan en forma de hojuelas.
Fotografía: Centro Internacional de la Papa (CIP)
La agricultura peruana ha tenido un crecimiento impresionante durante las últimas dos décadas, lo que ha contribuido a una caída sostenida del número de peruanos que viven en la pobreza. Y sin embargo millones de los pequeños agricultores del país no se han beneficiado de dicha prosperidad.  Un nuevo libro sobre el sector agrícola en el Perú ofrece ejemplos de enfoques más equitativos para  impulsar el desarrollo agrícola, a fin de aprovechar plenamente las potencialidades del sector para aliviar la pobreza.

Aspirations and poverty

Markus Goldstein's picture
Also available in Spanish,  French and Arabic
Photo credit: 5th Pillar


An expatriate Indian physics professor, when traveling back home to India, found himself harassed by endless extortion demands. As a way to fight corruption by shaming the officials who ask for bribes, the professor created a fake currency bill: the zero-rupee note.

The notes are identical to Indian banknotes, but carry the slogan, "Eliminate corruption at all levels," and the pledge, "I promise to neither accept nor give bribe".

Vijay Anand, president of the non-governmental organization 5th Pillar, thought the idea could work on a larger scale. Initially, the NGO printed 25,000 zero-rupee notes and distributed them to students in the southern state of Tamil Nadu. Since 2007, the NGO has distributed more than one million bills in five languages, covering 600-plus institutions. Volunteers hand them out near places where officials often solicit bribes, such as railway stations and government hospitals. 

Measuring Hope: Guest post by Bruce Wydick

Also available in: Français | العربية


Photo: Artit Wongpradu / Shutterstock.com

Islamic finance has been growing rapidly across the globe. According to a recent report by the Islamic Financial Services Board, the Islamic finance market currently stands around $1.9 trillion. With this growth, its application has been extended into many areas — trade, real estate, manufacturing, banking, infrastructure, and more.
 
However, Islamic finance is still a relatively untapped market for public-private partnership (PPP) financing, which makes the recent publication Mobilizing Islamic Finance for Infrastructure Public-Private Partnerships such an important resource, especially for governments and practitioners.