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Campaign Art

Campaign Art: End the Silence

Sangeetha Shanmugham's picture

People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month.
 
Violence against women is a major hurdle to development, and unless its root causes are addressed, many of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) will not be met. It’s an issue that stains the futures of millions of women and girls, every day, all over the world.
 
In a 2005 report, the World Health Organization stated that violence against women is a major threat to social and economic development. It has been linked to poverty, lack of education, gender inequality, child mortality and maternal illness. An unprecedented number of countries have laws against domestic violence, sexual assault and other forms of violence. Challenges remain however in implementing these laws, limiting women and girls’ access to safety and justice. Not enough is done to prevent violence, and when it does occur, it often goes unpunished.
 
Up to 7 in 10 women report having been physically or sexually abused at some point in their lifetime. Up to 50 per cent of sexual assaults are committed against girls under the age of 16. One in four women experiences physical or sexual violence during pregnancy.

Those are grim numbers and part of the problem is that violence against women is simply not recognized.

So how can we tackle this global issue? One way is by bringing more awareness to it.

Campaign Art: Reducing poverty through education

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.
 
Education is one of the most powerful tools to reduce poverty and combat inequality. According to UNESCO’s Global Education Monitoring Report: universalizing secondary education completion in low income countries by 2030 would increase per capita income by 75% by 2050 and bring poverty elimination forward by 10 years.

The Asian Institute of Management, an international management school based in Manila, Philippines, published the video below to illustrate how increased education translates into increased earnings and better functioning societies.
 
Towards Zero Poverty in the Philippines Project

Campaign Art: Flying for a cause

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.
 
In April 2015, a massive7.8 magnitude earthquake and its aftershocks devastated a large area in Nepal. Thousands of people perished under the rubble, and many buildings and infrastructure were destroyed. Numerous organizations went to help.

The World Bank offered up to half-a-billion dollars to finance the reconstruction of Nepal through different financing mechanisms, such as the Nepal Rural Housing Reconstruction Program.

Here is a particular example of the work done in Nepal by a small organization and their innovative outreach effort. On April 19, 2016, the Cloudbase Foundation (which works with hang glider and paraglider pilots to be effective agents of change within communities where they fly) published a video under the “GoPro for a cause” campaign to raise funds and awareness of the work that they are doing to help Nepalese communities recover from the effects of the earthquake.
 

Campaign Art: Respecting food’s life cycle

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

Food waste is a big problem in the world. According to the key facts on food loss and food waste by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), 1/3 of food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted globally, which amounts to about 1.3 billion tons per year.

Food waste happens throughout the food life cycle: from the field to your table. That also includes the scrubs from the food that actually makes it to the final stage and is consumed.
The city of San Francisco in California (United States) has commissioned these creative signs to encourage residents to compost their food waste. That way, the organic matter can go back to the earth as nutrients for the soil and for the next crop.
 






















 

Campaign Art: The Alphabet of Illiteracy

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

According to new data from UNESCO, there are 758 million adults 15 years and older who still cannot read or write a simple sentence. Roughly two-thirds of them are female. That means that approximately 1 in 10 adults in the world cannot read or write. For young women in sub-Saharan Africa, the rate remains very low: 4.5 of every 10 are illiterate (the literacy rate is 65% for that group).

Illiterate people are more likely than literate people to be poor, have children at an earlier age and lack opportunities to participate fully in society and have meaningful employment. The social costs of illiteracy are very big.

Project Literacy is a global movement that brings together a diverse cross-section of people and organizations from all over the world to build partnerships to improve literacy. They created the Alphabet of Illiteracy to demonstrate some of the possible effects of illiteracy in an impactful way.
 
The Alphabet Of Illiteracy - #ProjectLiteracy

Campaign Art: "We’re the Superhumans" celebrates Paralympics

Roxanne Bauer's picture

People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

Back in 2012, in the lead-up to the Summer Paralympic Games in London, the UK’s Channel 4 created a social ad, “Meet the Superhumans”, to raise awareness and understanding of disability in sport but also how truly impressive, stereotype-crushing and fun the Paralympics can be.  The ad was incredibly popular and the channel's live broadcast of the opening ceremony on the night of August 29, 2012, was watched by 11.8 million TV viewers - its largest audience in ten years. The campaign also successfully helped the London 2012 Paralympics become the first Paralympic Games to sell out. 
 
Thus, creating a follow-up ad for the 2016 Summer Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro Brazil was a daunting task. Yet, the sequel, “We’re the Superhumans” is one of the greatest possible sequels. It is three minutes of powerful, fun, and compelling brilliance. It features a range of people with disabilities playing musical instruments, taking part in a range of sporting events, and doing everyday activities like eating cereal or filling up the gas tank of a car to the tune of Sammy Davis Jr.’s 'Yes I Can'.

There are one-legged dancers and blind musicians as well as a rock climber with one arm, a rally driver who steers cars with his feet and children with prosthetic limbs playing football and bouncing on a trampoline.

The film acknowledges the challenges that disabled people face on a daily basis, but it also shows that disabled people are capable of doing both extraordinary and banal tasks as well as any able-bodied person could.
 

We're The Superhumans | Rio Paralympics 2016 Trailer

Source: Channel 4 (UK Paralympic Broadcaster)

Campaign Art: Spice Girls meet SDGs

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

A video went viral yesterday. You may have seen it. It is a remake of the famous 90’s girl-power song “Wannabe” by the Spice Girls. In the video, girls and women from different places of the world sing to the famous tune while showing signs and posters of what they “really really want” for girls.

This campaign has been put together by The Global Goals, an initiative that is working to raise awareness, popular support and global action for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The 17 SDGs were adopted by the United Nations in 2015, and each of the goals contain specific global targets to be achieved by 2030. Goal #5 is for gender equality and empowerment of all women and girls.
 
#WhatIReallyReallyWant
Source of video: The Global Goals

Campaign Art: Salvaging cars and saving lives

Davinia Levy's picture

People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

We all know that organ donations save lives. Some people have to wait months and years to receive the organ they need to stay alive. Sadly, some die before a compatible organ is found for them. According to the US Government, 22 people die each day waiting for an organ in that country alone. Globally, there are some countries that are very generous when it comes to organ donation. Argentina is not one of them.

A metaphor to view this issue is to compare the human body to car parts. If you think about it, in a way we all have a chassis (our skin, muscles and bones), a motor (our heart), we stay well-greased with oil (our blood), and our exhaust pipe is… well you can guess.

To incentivize organ donations in Argentina, a taxi company has been using donated car parts from a scrapyard to fix taxis in their fleet. In exchange, the taxis become visible awareness campaigns for the cause of organ donations.

CUCAIBA: Donor cars

Source: Ad Agency J. Walter Thompson Buenos Aires

Campaign Art: Dance lessons for scholarships

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

Do you know how to dance? You may be one of those that have a natural instinct for rhythm and movement, or you may be one of those that need some lessons to just learn how to do the steps.

How about exchanging dance lessons for scholarships? The Juan Pablo Gutierrez Caceres Foundation in Colombia offers scholarships for post-graduate studies to Colombian students with limited resources. This foundation capitalized on the great dance skills of the people of the Chocó region in Colombia. They offer online dance classes for a fee, and the money is used for the scholarship program of the foundation in that region.
 
CHOCÓ TO DANCE

Source of video: MullenLoweSSP3

Campaign Art: Soap that helps early detection of cancer

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

If you think about your community (family, friends, colleagues, etc), you probably know someone who has or has had breast cancer. According to the World Cancer Research Fund International, in 2012, breast cancer was the second most common cancer, with about 1.7 million new cases registered.
 
The good news, if any, is that breast cancer has a very high survival rates (of over 90%) when detected and treated at an early stage. A good way to detect cancer early is to perform routine self-exams to search for any lumps or changes in the breast area. A recommended time to do these self-exams is when we are naked and alone – and these conditions are met when we are in the shower.

To incentivize self-exams amongst the local population in Puerto Rico, HIMA San Pablo – a network of hospitals – came up with this public health awareness campaign. They distributed soap with a reminder carved in each soap bar and with waterproof instructions to correctly perform self-examinations in the shower.
 
The Life Soap

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