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Campaign Art

Campaign Art: #BeatMe

Darejani Markozashvili's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

In order to raise public awareness about violence against women and girls around the world, in 2008 the United Nations Secretary-General launched the UNiTE to End Violence against Women campaign, with the objective to bring together a number of agencies committed to end violence against women and girls. 

Gender based violence is a human rights violation that needs to be rooted out. “In 2012, 1 in 2 women killed worldwide were killed by their partners or family. Only 1 out of 20 of all men killed were killed in such circumstances” – reports UN Women, United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women. In order to reach the new Sustainable Development Goals, violence against women and girls needs to be at the forefront of the global agenda. 

Leading up to the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women (November 25), UN Women Pakistan published a powerful campaign video focusing on women’s rights.

This powerful video showcases a woman daring a man to beat her at things she is good at. It as an unusual campaign video, with a dramatic plot line, aiming to inspire women.

 
#BeatMe | I Am UNbeatable

Source of the video: UN Women

Campaign Art: Take a good look in the mirror

Darejani Markozashvili's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

Road traffic injuries are becoming a major cause of death throughout the world, claiming a total of 1.2 million lives each year. According to the data from the “Global Status Report on Road Safety” of World Health Organization (WHO), road traffic injuries are the leading cause of death among young people aged between 15 and 29 years.  

Alcohol intake increases the risk of traffic injuries and puts millions of lives in danger. Unless progress is accelerated, road injuries, especially involving drunk driving, will remain a major public health challenge. However, many of these deaths are largely preventable.

We Save Lives is a non-profit organization, dedicated to campaigning against drunk driving. In order to raise awareness about their cause, they launched a powerful anti-drunk driving initiative "Reflections From Inside"
 
We Save Lives

Source of the video: We Save Lives

Campaign Art: Fight Unfair

Darejani Markozashvili's picture

People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

Every child has the right to a fair chance in life, regardless of where they are born. However, according to new data from “The State of the World’s Children”, an annual flagship report from United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), nearly half of the world’s extreme poor are children, and many more experience multiple dimensions of poverty in their lives. Unless progress is accelerated, 167 million children will live in extreme poverty in 2030, and 69 million children under 5 will die between 2016 and 2030.

Children living and working in the streets are one of the most marginalized and disadvantaged. They are often deprived of services and care, pushed aside and neglected. Lack of shelter, nutritious food, and access to education robs these children of an opportunity of a better future.

In June 2016 UNICEF published the video below to illustrate the challenges children living in the streets face, especially the stigma society associates with them. It is a social experiment to test the public’s reaction to a young homeless girl.

Would you stop if you saw this little girl on the street?

Source of the video: UNICEF

Campaign art: Addiction may not be obvious but its effects are real

Roxanne Bauer's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

Do you have friends or people you follow on social media who always have a drink in their hand? Does that seem normal to you?  Did you ever wonder if they might have a problem?

Meet Louise Delage. She’s beautiful, trendy, and seems to lead a very glamorous life.  The only problem is she’s always drinking… and no one notices.  In the span of a few months, she was able to cultivate over 16,000 followers and 50,000 likes, few of whom noticed she is a functional alcoholic. The overwhelming majority of her followers just saw a pretty woman having fun, failing to notice her alcohol problem.

This is all part of a social campaign from Paris agency BETC called "Like My Addiction" rolled out for Addict Aide, which sought to raise awareness of alcoholism among young people. According to the organization, one out of every five deaths of young people each year is from addiction. The World Health Organization also warns of the hazards of alcohol, declaring that harmful alcohol consumption has now become "one of the most important risks to health: it is the leading risk factor in developing countries with low mortality rates and ranks third in developed countries, according to the World Health Report 2002."  Alcohol use contributes to a wide range of diseases, health conditions and high-risk behaviours, from mental disorders and road traffic injuries, to liver diseases and unsafe sexual behaviour.

The truth about Louise was revealed in a video published on Instagram and YouTube:
 
Like my Addiction

Campaign Art: End the Silence

Sangeetha Shanmugham's picture

People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month.
 
Violence against women is a major hurdle to development, and unless its root causes are addressed, many of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) will not be met. It’s an issue that stains the futures of millions of women and girls, every day, all over the world.
 
In a 2005 report, the World Health Organization stated that violence against women is a major threat to social and economic development. It has been linked to poverty, lack of education, gender inequality, child mortality and maternal illness. An unprecedented number of countries have laws against domestic violence, sexual assault and other forms of violence. Challenges remain however in implementing these laws, limiting women and girls’ access to safety and justice. Not enough is done to prevent violence, and when it does occur, it often goes unpunished.
 
Up to 7 in 10 women report having been physically or sexually abused at some point in their lifetime. Up to 50 per cent of sexual assaults are committed against girls under the age of 16. One in four women experiences physical or sexual violence during pregnancy.

Those are grim numbers and part of the problem is that violence against women is simply not recognized.

So how can we tackle this global issue? One way is by bringing more awareness to it.

Campaign Art: Reducing poverty through education

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.
 
Education is one of the most powerful tools to reduce poverty and combat inequality. According to UNESCO’s Global Education Monitoring Report: universalizing secondary education completion in low income countries by 2030 would increase per capita income by 75% by 2050 and bring poverty elimination forward by 10 years.

The Asian Institute of Management, an international management school based in Manila, Philippines, published the video below to illustrate how increased education translates into increased earnings and better functioning societies.
 
Towards Zero Poverty in the Philippines Project

Campaign Art: Flying for a cause

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.
 
In April 2015, a massive7.8 magnitude earthquake and its aftershocks devastated a large area in Nepal. Thousands of people perished under the rubble, and many buildings and infrastructure were destroyed. Numerous organizations went to help.

The World Bank offered up to half-a-billion dollars to finance the reconstruction of Nepal through different financing mechanisms, such as the Nepal Rural Housing Reconstruction Program.

Here is a particular example of the work done in Nepal by a small organization and their innovative outreach effort. On April 19, 2016, the Cloudbase Foundation (which works with hang glider and paraglider pilots to be effective agents of change within communities where they fly) published a video under the “GoPro for a cause” campaign to raise funds and awareness of the work that they are doing to help Nepalese communities recover from the effects of the earthquake.
 

Campaign Art: Respecting food’s life cycle

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

Food waste is a big problem in the world. According to the key facts on food loss and food waste by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), 1/3 of food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted globally, which amounts to about 1.3 billion tons per year.

Food waste happens throughout the food life cycle: from the field to your table. That also includes the scrubs from the food that actually makes it to the final stage and is consumed.
The city of San Francisco in California (United States) has commissioned these creative signs to encourage residents to compost their food waste. That way, the organic matter can go back to the earth as nutrients for the soil and for the next crop.
 






















 

Campaign Art: The Alphabet of Illiteracy

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

According to new data from UNESCO, there are 758 million adults 15 years and older who still cannot read or write a simple sentence. Roughly two-thirds of them are female. That means that approximately 1 in 10 adults in the world cannot read or write. For young women in sub-Saharan Africa, the rate remains very low: 4.5 of every 10 are illiterate (the literacy rate is 65% for that group).

Illiterate people are more likely than literate people to be poor, have children at an earlier age and lack opportunities to participate fully in society and have meaningful employment. The social costs of illiteracy are very big.

Project Literacy is a global movement that brings together a diverse cross-section of people and organizations from all over the world to build partnerships to improve literacy. They created the Alphabet of Illiteracy to demonstrate some of the possible effects of illiteracy in an impactful way.
 
The Alphabet Of Illiteracy - #ProjectLiteracy

Campaign Art: "We’re the Superhumans" celebrates Paralympics

Roxanne Bauer's picture

People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

Back in 2012, in the lead-up to the Summer Paralympic Games in London, the UK’s Channel 4 created a social ad, “Meet the Superhumans”, to raise awareness and understanding of disability in sport but also how truly impressive, stereotype-crushing and fun the Paralympics can be.  The ad was incredibly popular and the channel's live broadcast of the opening ceremony on the night of August 29, 2012, was watched by 11.8 million TV viewers - its largest audience in ten years. The campaign also successfully helped the London 2012 Paralympics become the first Paralympic Games to sell out. 
 
Thus, creating a follow-up ad for the 2016 Summer Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro Brazil was a daunting task. Yet, the sequel, “We’re the Superhumans” is one of the greatest possible sequels. It is three minutes of powerful, fun, and compelling brilliance. It features a range of people with disabilities playing musical instruments, taking part in a range of sporting events, and doing everyday activities like eating cereal or filling up the gas tank of a car to the tune of Sammy Davis Jr.’s 'Yes I Can'.

There are one-legged dancers and blind musicians as well as a rock climber with one arm, a rally driver who steers cars with his feet and children with prosthetic limbs playing football and bouncing on a trampoline.

The film acknowledges the challenges that disabled people face on a daily basis, but it also shows that disabled people are capable of doing both extraordinary and banal tasks as well as any able-bodied person could.
 

We're The Superhumans | Rio Paralympics 2016 Trailer

Source: Channel 4 (UK Paralympic Broadcaster)


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