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Entrepreneurship

New Varieties of Orchids for Mexico

Dennis Szesko's picture

Dennis Szeszko's passion for exploration and discovery has yielded not only a venture-backed start-up company in Mexico but also new varieties of orchids for the international commercial flower market –  ones that are hybridized to be grown without soil. The JKP spoke with him about he created his business, the skills that are useful for being an entrepreneur, and how policymakers can encourage new firms, especially in agriculture, as farmers try to switch over to higher-value crops.

The Endeavor Model: High-Impact Entrepreneurs

Fernando Fabre's picture

Developing countries are often counseled to encourage entrepreneurship as a way to boost growth and create jobs. But the way to do that often isn't clear, given that these countries may not have much experience with role models, management expertise, and access to smart capital, to name just a few likely barriers. One innovative effort under way in this regard is Endeavor Global, a nonprofit that tries to help transform emerging countries by establishing High-Impact Entrepreneurship as the leading force for sustainable economic development. We spoke with its President, Fernando Fabre.

Engaging the Future: Conversations with Global Youth

Mabruk Kabir's picture

It is hard to talk about South Asia without invoking its demographics. The region will contribute nearly 40 percent of the growth in the world’s working age (15-64) population, and will need to add a staggering 1 to 1.2 million new entrants to the labor market every month for the next two decades. Absorbing the influx of youth into the labor force is one of South Asia’s core challenges. But while economists grapple with employment statistics and economic policy, jobs are created at the grassroots. Entrepreneurship is the spark that lights the fire, and the engine that generates opportunities in local communities.

Measuring entrepreneurship (I)

Markus Goldstein's picture

This post is coauthored with Francisco Campos

A bat and a ball cost Rs. 1100 in total. The bat costs Rs. 1000 more than the ball. How much does the ball cost?    A culturally appropriate GRE? No, this question comes from the cognitive portion of a test designed to measure entrepreneurship in Sri Lanka. 

Are female firms less productive? Findings from the Rural Investment Climate Pilot Surveys

Rita Costa's picture

The potentially deleterious effects of gender disparities on growth and poverty reduction have been receiving progressively more policy attention (reflected, for instance, in the inclusion of the promotion of gender parity amongst the Millennium Development Goals and the 2012 World Development Report). Inequities in labor market opportunities are of particular concern since labor earnings are the most important source of income for the poor in the vast majority of developing countries.
 
Although the vast majority of the poor live in rural areas and rural non-farm enterprises account for about 35-50% of rural income and roughly a third of rural employment in developing countries, relatively little is known about gender inequities in rural non-agricultural labor market outcomes due to data-limitations. This is unfortunate given the proliferation and diversification of rural non-farm activities and their potential to alleviate poverty, especially in countries where the importance of agriculture as an employer is likely to diminish.

From Poverty to Entrepreneurship

Sarathbabu Elumalai's picture

Sarathbabu Elumalai is the founder and Chief Executive Officer of Food King, a food catering business in Chennai, India, with about 300 employees. He grew up in a slum but went on to get a masters degree from the Indian Institute of Management-Ahmedabad and then started the company in 2006 with only $40 in capital. He was honored for his entrepreneurship and leadership skills at the World Bank’s 2012 Global Youth Conference in March. He spoke with us about the challenges of launching a company and the critical need for information and access to finance.

Rising to the Reform Challenge: Doing Business in Indonesia

Katerina Leris's picture

Read this post in Bahasa.

Ambitious and fast rising—these words aptly describe modern Indonesia. Amidst a global economic slowdown, Indonesia was the third fastest growing economy among the G-20 for 2009 and it continues to post strong economic growth, at a projected rate of 6.4% for 2012. Improving economic competitiveness by creating a more salutary business climate is one of Indonesia’s national priorities for 2010 to 2014.Like other cities in Indonesia, Banda Aceh has made strides in many areas measured.

Indonesia is walking the talk. Doing Business in Indonesia 2012 launched January 31 in Jakarta, finds  that all 14 cities previously measured in Doing Business in Indonesia 2010 have improved business registration processes over the last two years, while 10 out of 14 cities expedited the approval of construction permits. During his keynote address on the launching of the report, the Minister of State Ministry for Administrative Reforms talked about the cities moving from 'comfort zone' to 'competitive zone'.

Impact of the Financial Crisis on New Firm Registration

Leora Klapper's picture

As reports of sluggish global job creation continue, some look to new firms as a source of net job creation (Haltiwanger, 2011). But the lead article of this month’s Economics Letters, citing panel data from 93 countries, shows that most countries experienced a sharp drop in new firm registration during the financial crisis. As discussed in an earlier blog, relatively larger contractions are seen in countries with more developed financial markets and where entrepreneurs depend more on banks for start-up capital.

The hybrid entrepreneur

Michael Jarvis's picture

Can social entrepreneurs forge a more productive collaboration with corporations that yield development and business benefits? Bill Drayton and Valeria Budinich suggest that they can, as detailed in their article in Harvard Business Review. They introduce the concept of hybrid value chains (HVCs) based around four key criteria – that they create real economic as well as social value, have the potential to go to scale across borders, are profitable and hence sustainable, and offer a basis for new competition.


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