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Entrepreneurship

Insights into Innovation, Tech & Entrepreneurship from the World's Economists

Leonardo Iacovone's picture

Photo credit: Nhuisman, Flickr Creative Commons

I recently attended the American Economic Association annual conference in San Diego—the world’s largest gathering for economists.  There were more than 50 parallel sessions on a wide array of topics and several previews and presentations of papers –so there was a surplus of interesting ideas and insights. As an Economist who works in innovation, technology and entrepreneurship, I was particularly focused on papers that were relevant to my areas of interest.  Highlights are under the cut.

Sparking Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Part II)

John Van Reenan's picture

As policy makers in developed and developing countries alike search for ways to boost productivity, create more and better jobs, increase wages, and lower poverty, they are increasingly focusing on stimulating innovation and entrepreneurship. How can this be done? We asked an expert on this topic – John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance and Professor of Economics, London School of Economics. In Part II of this two-part series, he emphasizes the need for countries to not only find their comparative advantage but ensure that it is in an area where demand is likely to grow.

Sparking Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Part I)

John Van Reenan's picture

As policy makers in developed and developing countries alike search for ways to boost productivity, create more and better jobs, increase wages, and lower poverty, they are increasingly focusing on stimulating innovation and entrepreneurship. How can this be done? We asked an expert on this topic – John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance and Professor of Economics, London School of Economics.

Cultivating the Entrepreneurial Spirit in the Middle East and North Africa

Neveen El Tahri's picture

For the Middle East and North Africa, a major challenge is creating meaningful and plentiful job opportunities. How can this be done? We spoke with Neveen El Tahri, Chairwoman and Managing Director of Delta Shield for Investment, an organization she founded to mentor Egyptian entrepreneurs.

Notes from the ‘Capital of Innovation’

Murat Seker's picture

This past summer, I joined my colleagues on a visit to the Global Innovation Summit and study tour in Silicon Valley—which is undoubtedly the world’s capital of innovation and entrepreneurship. Also joining us were representatives from Lebanon and Vietnam, who were clearly interested in enabling inclusive innovation in their respective countries.

Silicon Valley isn't afraid of failing and risking its way to success.  The Global Innovation Summit brought together more than 500 innovation practitioners—including entrepreneurs, financiers, think tanks, NGOs engaged in inclusive innovation, and government officials from emerging markets.  While we were there, we got an inside look at business accelerators, financiers, higher education institutions, and NGOs engaged in inclusive innovation.  It was an important learning opportunity for us, considering the importance of innovation to the development agenda and the World Bank’s role in fostering innovation in our client countries. 

New Varieties of Orchids for Mexico

Dennis Szesko's picture

Dennis Szeszko's passion for exploration and discovery has yielded not only a venture-backed start-up company in Mexico but also new varieties of orchids for the international commercial flower market –  ones that are hybridized to be grown without soil. The JKP spoke with him about he created his business, the skills that are useful for being an entrepreneur, and how policymakers can encourage new firms, especially in agriculture, as farmers try to switch over to higher-value crops.

The Endeavor Model: High-Impact Entrepreneurs

Fernando Fabre's picture

Developing countries are often counseled to encourage entrepreneurship as a way to boost growth and create jobs. But the way to do that often isn't clear, given that these countries may not have much experience with role models, management expertise, and access to smart capital, to name just a few likely barriers. One innovative effort under way in this regard is Endeavor Global, a nonprofit that tries to help transform emerging countries by establishing High-Impact Entrepreneurship as the leading force for sustainable economic development. We spoke with its President, Fernando Fabre.

Engaging the Future: Conversations with Global Youth

Mabruk Kabir's picture

It is hard to talk about South Asia without invoking its demographics. The region will contribute nearly 40 percent of the growth in the world’s working age (15-64) population, and will need to add a staggering 1 to 1.2 million new entrants to the labor market every month for the next two decades. Absorbing the influx of youth into the labor force is one of South Asia’s core challenges. But while economists grapple with employment statistics and economic policy, jobs are created at the grassroots. Entrepreneurship is the spark that lights the fire, and the engine that generates opportunities in local communities.


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