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Bridging the skills gap is key for energy access, new jobs

Rebekah Shirley's picture
Frontier Markets (night shot)/Power for All


Progress is being made in closing energy access gaps in Africa and Asia. A big reason is falling renewable energy costs, which have made home solar systems, mini-grids and other distributed renewable energy (DRE) solutions a viable option for providing first-ever electricity in remote, rural areas far removed from electric grids.

For the first time ever, the number of people gaining access to electricity in Sub-Saharan Africa is outstripping population growth. More than 700,000 home solar systems have been installed in Kenya alone and another 240,000 poor, rural households are expected to be connected soon under a new $150 million off-grid project backed by the World Bank. In South Asia, progress has been ever faster.

What will it take to accelerate these gains for the nearly 1 billion people worldwide still living without electricity?

Celebrating Africa's Female Athletes and Leaders of Tomorrow

Makhtar Diop's picture
Stephan Gladieu/World Bank


Last week we saw two Ivorian women, Murielle Ahouré and Marie-Josée Ta Lou, fly past the finish line in a historic one-two finish in the 60 meters sprint at the World Indoor Championships in Birmingham, England while Burundi’s Francine Niyonsaba triumphed in a gritty 800 meters race. From the 60 meters to the 3000 meters, African women graced the podium or were not far from it, a testament to their athletic prowess.

Campaign Art: Soap that helps early detection of cancer

Davinia Levy's picture
People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

If you think about your community (family, friends, colleagues, etc), you probably know someone who has or has had breast cancer. According to the World Cancer Research Fund International, in 2012, breast cancer was the second most common cancer, with about 1.7 million new cases registered.
 
The good news, if any, is that breast cancer has a very high survival rates (of over 90%) when detected and treated at an early stage. A good way to detect cancer early is to perform routine self-exams to search for any lumps or changes in the breast area. A recommended time to do these self-exams is when we are naked and alone – and these conditions are met when we are in the shower.

To incentivize self-exams amongst the local population in Puerto Rico, HIMA San Pablo – a network of hospitals – came up with this public health awareness campaign. They distributed soap with a reminder carved in each soap bar and with waterproof instructions to correctly perform self-examinations in the shower.
 
The Life Soap

Better together: Toilets and nutrition

Claire Chase's picture
​Studies show children grow taller and perform better
on cognitive tests in communities where residents have
access to improved sanitation and do not defecate
in the open. Photo credit: World Bank

In Mongolia, better provider payment systems help maintain universal coverage and improve care

Aparnaa Somanathan's picture
Co-authored with Cheryl Cashin, Senior Program Director, Results for Development
 
In the early 1990s, after 70 years of a socialist system, Mongolia transitioned to a market economy and embarked on reform across all sectors, including health. Since that time, the health system has gradually moved from a centralized “Semashko-style” model to a somewhat more decentralized financing and service delivery, with a growing role for private sector providers and private out-of-pocket financing.
 

World Water Day: We want to hear from you

Water Communications's picture





​Each year on March 22 we mark World Water Day. It is an opportunity to keep the urgent water issues – from lack of sanitation to transboundary water to climate change -- top of my mind for practitioners, decision makers and the global public. In the coming days we will post here updates and stories from the field, as well as links to some of our partners’ content. But, more importantly, this is an opportunity to hear from you, too.
 

Corridors for Shared Prosperity: A Case for Replication

Pallavi Shrivastava's picture

For those trying to address challenges in global poverty, inclusive businesses offer solutions to some of the world’s most intractable social problems. Business models that create value for the low-income communities are becoming viable - these have been tested, fine-tuned and perfected by some of the finest brains. Once perfected, it makes sense to contextualize and spread these innovations or the knowledge to markets across the globe. To be able to do this, replication is an important tool.

Philippines: Traffic woes and the road ahead

louielimkin's picture
Traffic congestion results in an estimated productivity loss of around PHP2.4 billion ($54 million) a day or more than PHP800 billion ($18 billion) a year.



From my house in northern Quezon City, I drive more than two hours every day to get to the office in Bonifacio Global City, which is about three cities away where I come from, and two cities away from the capital Manila. It’s a journey that should only take around half an hour under light traffic. That is a total of four hours on the road a day, if there is no road accident or bad weather. It takes me an hour longer whenever I use the public transport system. Along with hundreds of thousands of Metro Rail Transit (MRT) commuters, I have to contend with extremely long lines, slow trains, and frequent delays due to malfunctions. This has been my experience for several years. Many of us might be wondering: why have these problems persisted?


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