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Media (R)evolutions: Bringing the next 4.4 billion people online will require collaboration to overcome barriers

Roxanne Bauer's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

Increasingly, access to the Internet is crucial both in economic and social dimensions.  It contributes to national gross domestic product (GDP) and fuels new, innovative industries and brings about social change, connecting individuals and communities, providing access to information and education, and promoting greater transparency. Since 2004, around 1.8 billion people have gained access to the internet, driven mainly by the expansion of mobile-network coverage, urbanization, decreasing device and data-plan prices, a growing middle class worldwide, and the increasing utility of the Internet.

Nevertheless, its adoption worldwide has not been even, and the growth rate of Internet users worldwide has slowed significantly in recent years.  One reason broader internet adoption will may stagnate in future years is that about 75% of the offline population is concentrated in 20 countries and is disproportionately rural, low income, elderly, illiterate, and female.

The graph below is based on a report from McKinsey&Company, “Offline and falling behind: Barriers to Internet adoption,” and World Bank data.  It was compiled by Mary Meeker and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers as part of their annual Internet Trends Report. It illustrates four main factors limiting internet adoptionincentives, infrastructure, user capabilities, and low incomes and affordabilityas well as a set of five groupings that provide insight into each set’s common challenges.
 

Local content in extractive industries: a tool for economic diversification and sustainable development

Anita Marangoly George's picture
Photo by Dominic Chavez / World Bank

When you ask young people from developing countries what they want for their country, they often say opportunity. The next generation wants jobs and knowledge; they want to be connected to the global economy.

Extractive industries can foster these types of opportunities through investment in skills training and transfer of technology to local workers and companies. These technical skills are demanded in the global marketplace today and empower workers to expand their horizons and lower their risk of unemployment. 

We are discussing these issues today at a “Reconciling Trade and Local Content Development” conference we are co-hosting with the Mexican Ministry of Economy. This event aims to share knowledge on how investment in extractive industries can be leveraged to generate opportunities for economic diversification and employment.

When extractives companies include local business in their supply chain they foster sustainable growth and help end poverty. The most valuable contribution to long term sustainability comes from the ability of extractive industries to generate benefits through productive linkages with other sectors. The International Finance Corporation (IFC) helped make this happen in Barmer, India, where we supported a Skill Development Center that trained 7,000 people to work in the operations of Cairn Energy. Not only did this training create direct job opportunities for the local population, but the acquired skills fostered the creation of an entire eco-system of small and medium-size enterprises that provided products and services to the oil company and related sectors.

Weekly Wire: The Global Forum

Roxanne Bauer's picture

These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.

Discarding Democracy: A Return to the Iron Fist- Freedom in the World 2015
Freedom House
For the ninth consecutive year, Freedom in the World, Freedom House’s annual report on the condition of global political rights and civil liberties, showed an overall decline. Indeed, acceptance of democracy as the world’s dominant form of government—and of an international system built on democratic ideals—is under greater threat than at any point in the last 25 years.  Even after such a long period of mounting pressure on democracy, developments in 2014 were exceptionally grim. The report’s findings show that nearly twice as many countries suffered declines as registered gains, 61 to 33, with the number of gains hitting its lowest point since the nine-year erosion began.
 
Digital Inclusion: The Vital Role of Local Content
Innovations, MIT Press
The journal features cases authored by exceptional innovators; commentary and research from leading academics; and essays from globally recognized executives and political leaders.  The current issue contains lead essays entitled “Building a Foundation for Digital Inclusion”, “Inequitable Distributions in Internet Geographies”, and “To the Next Billion”.  It also includes case narratives entitled “A Mobile Guide Toward Better Health” and “A Social Network for Farmer Training” and more.

Can Natural Resources Pave the Road to Africa’s Industrialization?

Paulo de Sa's picture

Many African countries face a dilemma. After a decade of consistent economic growth, often propelled by high commodity prices, half the continent’s population still lives in poverty. Even if rising demand for raw materials from the booming cities of China and India, among others, has driven growth in Africa’s mining sector, most of the continent has not yet translated mineral wealth into industrialization and widespread economic development. Most African countries continue to export raw materials and then pay a premium to import the products made with them.