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Media (R)evolutions

Media (R)evolutions: Audiences trust established news brands more than new brands or journalists

Roxanne Bauer's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

News audiences typically trust institutions more than individuals. It is the news brand — its heritage, values, and journalistic standards — that people identify with, not the celebrity journalists or talking heads, according to the Reuters Digital News Report 2016 that surveyed over 50,000 online news consumers in 26 countries.

Who is this anonymous source? Did somebody pay the outlet to run this story? Can I trust the journalist to give me an unbiased report? These questions remain pertinent for contemporary news consumers, and the Digital News Report suggests that trust in the news is more strongly tied to trust in specific news brands than any other factor. In all 26 countries, trust in news organizations was the most important driver of overall trust, and was significantly more important than trust in journalists or freedom from undue governmental influence.  This perhaps signals that news audiences are weary of citizen journalism, blogs, and other forms of news that have not been vetted and, therefore, cannot be readily screened for bias.

However, an important point, often made by participants in the follow-up focus groups, was that trust in news brands takes a long time to build. Some news brands – typically those that have been around a long time – are often seen as main sources of news, and new outlets, even if they have a large reach, are considered secondary sources.


 

Media (R)evolutions: Digital news gains ground on traditional print press

Roxanne Bauer's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

Many newspapers and media watchers around the world bemoan the “death of print”, stirring a sense of loss because print newspapers represent something historical, nostalgic, or dramatic to their readers.  Many who lament the demise of print newspapers do so because they believe it signals two broad trends: younger generations don’t see the point of buying a hard copy of newsprint and people are reading less and are, therefore, less informed.  On the first point, it is true that in developed countries there has been a steady decline in the circulation of newspaper print editions, but it should be noted that print media is still growing in developing media countries, like India and China.  

On the second point, it’s clear that people are not actually reading less news. Data from Global Web Index makes it clear that internet users are spending more time each day perusing digital news. On average, adults with internet access are now spending 50 minutes a day reading online press – more than 10 minutes longer than they spend reading print versions. Mobiles phones have had a clear impact, allowing users to keep up with the news throughout the day, and 6 in 10 adults are now visiting news websites on their mobiles each month, with 41% using a dedicated news app. 

This data suggests that the market for paid news is not failing and there are possible business models for online news. The need for information will not vanish and their remains a market for high-quality credible news. Press sites will have to work harder, though, to convince consumers to visit their sites directly rather than social networks as Twitter and Facebook, which have been positioning themselves as prime sources for news.

Media (R)evolutions: New Publications on Media Development around the World

Roxanne Bauer's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

Twice a year, CAMECO, a consultancy specializing in media and communications, publishes a list of selected publications on media and communications in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, Latin America and the Middle East. This rich resource includes 250 titles, covering recent media developments and project experiences in about 150 countries worldwide. Many of the titles can be downloaded directly.
 
The following topics are covered in the January – June 2016 edition:
 

> Audience Research & Media Use
> Children & Media, Youth & Media, Media Literacy
> Christian & Religious Communication
> Cinema & Media Entertainment
> Community Media & Citizen Journalism
> Conflicts, Media & Peacebuilding
> Democracy, Governance & Media, Political Communication
> Development Communication, Environmental Communication, Health Communication
> Disaster & Humanitarian Crisis Communication
> Economics & Management of Media
> Freedom of the Press, Media Policies, Media Legislation
> Gender & Media
> International Communication, Foreign News, Public Diplomacy
> Journalism & Journalism Training
> Media Assistance
> Media Landscapes, Media & Communication General, Media & Society

Media (R)evolutions: Film industry will grow in coming years- mostly in Asia Pacific

Roxanne Bauer's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

The film industry will see a great deal of movement and huge shifts in audiences over the next five years, but will be strong overall. Much of the growth will be attributable to a 12% growth rate in the Asia Pacific region.  Predominant areas of growth will include box office revenue, electronic home entertainment, event cinema, and local-language production throughout the world.  Video game adaptations are also growing rapidly. For example, Universal Pictures released “Warcraft” in the U.S. on June 10, garnering dismal reviews and only $45.9 million at the box office since then, while in China the film made $65.1 million in its opening weekend and a total of $ $219.7 million by the end of June, where it was supported by an elaborate marketing campaign. Thanks to these robust Chinese earnings and another $412.6 million world-wide it became the highest grossing film adaptation of a videogame ever.

This graph shows strong growth across the film industry, according to PricewaterhouseCoopers' annual Global Entertainment and Media Outlook and reported in The Hollywood Reporter.


Media (R) evolutions: How does world population compare to social media users?

Davinia Levy's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

Have you checked your social media channels today? Posted a filtered - or #nofilter - picture, shared a cute cat video or twitted your views on an interesting news piece?

If the answer is yes, you are not alone. There are actually a lot of people using social media. Here is an infographic that shows social media by the number of active monthly users compared with the world’s population.

Media (R)evolutions: Citizens are eager to interact with their cities but need greater access to digital platforms

Roxanne Bauer's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

Digital technologies have been lauded for their ability to set aside social and geographic boundaries, allowing people to communicate with others from different backgrounds in different parts of the world.  They are also known for their capacity to collect and track data on end users that can be used in the aggregate to inform decision-making. This level of engagement and data analysis led some to wonder if digital technologies would democratize communication and service delivery between governments and their citizens. Civic leaders, the argument followed, who embrace new technologies could benefit from deeper community engagement and increased stakeholder awareness on government initiatives and would be equipped with a steady flow of constituent feedback and a transparent track record.  Communities would be rewarded with insights into the functioning of new systems and the demand for city services as well as means to report inconsistencies or problems.
 
While the dream of proper two-way communication and digital feedback loops has not been realized by most cities, citizens would appreciate direct, real-time interaction with their local governments. While less than one-third of citizens (32%) are currently providing feedback to their local authorities, over one-half say they would like to do so. A large number of citizens (51%) want wider access to digital platforms to enable them to communicate with government or expansion of free wifi in public spaces (50%), perhaps signaling that basics, like access to the Internet and digital literacy skills, may have the greatest impact on citizens’ ability to interact. Many citizens— in both developed and developing countries— still lack broadband access at home and have limited data to use on smartphones. This means that as governments attempt to interact on digital platforms and share information online, they also need to be mindful of the digital divide within communities.
 

 

Media (R)evolutions: Majority of global citizens are concerned about a lack of privacy online, according to survey

Roxanne Bauer's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

Individuals are increasingly concerned about their online privacy and security‚ especially regarding ‎how private corporations and governments use and share their personal data, according to the 2016 CIGI-Ipsos Global Survey on Internet Security and Trust, commissioned by the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) and conducted by global research company Ipsos.  

A clear majority of global citizens are concerned (79%) that their personal data is available and monitored online. Even more (83%) believe that there need to be new rules about how companies‚ governments and other users use personal data, and 85% believe their government should work in closely with other governments and organizations to ensure better Internet security and safety.

However, the results of the survey also find that most individuals (70%) approve of law enforcement accessing private online conversations if they have national security reasons to do so, and if they are investigating someone suspected of a crime, 85% responded that governments should be able to find out who their suspects are communicating with online.

More contentious is the idea of whether companies should be allowed to develop technologies that prevent law enforcement from accessing the content of an individual’s online conversations. On this issue, 63% agree that companies should not develop this technology.

The following graph is just one of many presented in the survey’s findings. It demonstrates that most are concerned that too much of their personal information is available online, leading to worries about privacy. Moreover, similar numbers of people are concerned that they are being actively monitored online by governments or other organizations.

Source: 2016 CIGI-Ipsos Global Survey on Internet Security and Trust

Media (R)evolutions: Bringing the next 4.4 billion people online will require collaboration to overcome barriers

Roxanne Bauer's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

Increasingly, access to the Internet is crucial both in economic and social dimensions.  It contributes to national gross domestic product (GDP) and fuels new, innovative industries and brings about social change, connecting individuals and communities, providing access to information and education, and promoting greater transparency. Since 2004, around 1.8 billion people have gained access to the internet, driven mainly by the expansion of mobile-network coverage, urbanization, decreasing device and data-plan prices, a growing middle class worldwide, and the increasing utility of the Internet.

Nevertheless, its adoption worldwide has not been even, and the growth rate of Internet users worldwide has slowed significantly in recent years.  One reason broader internet adoption will may stagnate in future years is that about 75% of the offline population is concentrated in 20 countries and is disproportionately rural, low income, elderly, illiterate, and female.

The graph below is based on a report from McKinsey&Company, “Offline and falling behind: Barriers to Internet adoption,” and World Bank data.  It was compiled by Mary Meeker and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers as part of their annual Internet Trends Report. It illustrates four main factors limiting internet adoptionincentives, infrastructure, user capabilities, and low incomes and affordabilityas well as a set of five groupings that provide insight into each set’s common challenges.
 

Media (R)evolutions: The evolution of magazines from print to multi-media hubs

Roxanne Bauer's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.
 
Worldwide, it’s fairly clear that the internet and mobile phones are disrupting media systems. In particular, print newspapers are in decline, as many struggle to compete with online and niche news sources.  In contrast, however, magazines have benefited from digital technology, capitalizing on niche interests and digital platforms.

Indeed, there has been an ongoing transformation within the magazine industry that is driven by digitalization: while the printed magazine was previously the hub around which all of its other business revolved, magazines are now multi-media brands of which the physical magazine is just one— although critical— asset.

The chart below, based on findings by Folio and compiled by Statista, shows how the magazine industry has diversified its sources of engagement and revenue from 2004 to 2014.

Media (R)evolutions: Streaming into the future - Digital music increases its global share in the industry

Davinia Levy's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

How do you get your music? This is such a relevant question nowadays, since there are many ways to enjoy our favorite melodies: Do you buy physical copies (i.e., CDs - or vinyl for the essentialists amongst us)? Do you download your songs and singles? Or do you stream it directly from the internet? The music market is constantly evolving, and the way we consume music has a large impact in the industry’s revenues.  

Last month, the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) launched its Global Music Report 2016, which outlines the state of the recorded music market worldwide. According to their own news release: “The global music market achieved a key milestone in 2015 when digital became the primary revenue stream for recorded music, overtaking sales of physical formats for the first time.”

Mark Mulligan, a media and technology analyst, put together in his Music Industry Blog, the following graph analyzing the numbers from the Global Music Report.


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