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migration

The European Pact on Immigration and Asylum: Will there be more competition for skilled workers?

Sonia Plaza's picture

Last Thursday, the European Union’s interior ministers agreed on the European Pact on Immigration and Asylum.
 

Until recently, immigration policies in the majority of EU countries have tended to be “skill blind”, and large inflows of immigrants have been admitted for humanitarian reasons. Now, the trend of re-directing migration policy towards economic (largely skilled) immigration, initiated by Australia, New Zealand and Canada, is being followed by the UK and other EU countries.

Are High Global Oil Prices Influencing Migration Patterns?

Sanket Mohapatra's picture

(Zhimei Xu contributed to this post)

Oil prices increased from $26/barrel in early 2001 to over $130/barrel in June 2008, vastly enriching some countries flush with natural resources. Rising prices may affect migration patterns from origin countries in South and Southeast Asia, most noticeably away from the United States and towards the oil-rich Middle East countries.

Migration in the Gulf: Balancing cultural and economic needs

Sanket Mohapatra's picture

The six Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries are experiencing an economic boom due to high oil prices. These countries also have some of the highest immigration rates in the world.  According to this Economist article, these governments are becoming increasingly anxious at the erosion of their national cultures.

Climate change and the migration fallout

Sonia Plaza's picture

The impact of sea level rise from global warming could be catastrophic for many developing countries.  The World Bank estimates that even a one meter rise would turn at least 56 million people in the developing world into environmental refugees. 

 

Not only do countries need to start planning and implementing measures for adaptation, but the international community and some countries will need to devise an immigration strategy how to deal with populations who will be forced to resettle due to climate change.


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