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migration

Moving away from home... and away from poverty?

Kathleen Beegle's picture

Finding routes out of poverty remains a key issue for households and policy makers alike. A long term vision of development in Africa and elsewhere suggests that poverty reduction is associated with intergenerational mobility out of rural areas and agriculture, and into urban non-agricultural settings. To respond to new economic opportunities, people must be geographically mobile. Constraints to their movement may in fact impede economic growth.

Consumption smoothing via migration and remittances

Dilip Ratha's picture

Atlanta Fed Research Economist Federico Mandelman and Andrei Zlate, a PhD candidate in economics at Boston College, have prepared a paper analyzing the role that of migration and remittances during the business cycle. The data they present indicate that when the U.S. economy has outperformed Mexico’s, there were usually more attempted illegal crossings into the United States.

Helping people escape from poor geography or poor governance - from World Development Report 2009

Dilip Ratha's picture

World Development Report 2009, the World Bank's annual flagship, has devoted a significant chapter to the migration of people. “Throughout history, mobility has helped people escape the tyranny of poor geography or poor governance,” argues Indermit Gill, the lead author, “...mobile people and products form the cornerstone of inclusive, sustainable globalization.”

In my backyard, or not—but is that really the question?

Andrea Liverani's picture
In my backyard, or not—but is that really the question?
   Photo © World Bank

For years scientists have argued that in order to grab the public’s attention to global warming, citizens must be told how the towns, regions and communities in which they and their children live will be affected. Information on local level impacts – the argument runs – makes climate change “real” and should therefore be the cornerstone of public support for mitigation.

The financial crisis and immigration policy: how some developed countries are coping

Sonia Plaza's picture

More restrictive immigration policies by developed country governments are being implemented as the financial crisis deepens. For example, the United Kingdom just published a bill which contains some of the following measures:

1) Migrants who are not citizens or permanent residents of the UK will not have access to full services benefits and social housing; and


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