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migration

What can make rural-to-urban migration successful in China?

Xiaoqing Yu's picture

When we visited a poor village in Qingxing county of north Guangdong a few weeks ago to work on a study of inequality,  I was struck by the severity of poverty in places only a few hours away from the most dynamic and prosperous Pearl River Delta. One family that we visited had almost no furniture. Another only lived on 90 yuan (US$13) per month from the social assistance program.

Migrant remittances

Dilip Ratha's picture

Migrant remittances provide a lifeline to the poor in many countries. Migration and remittances will continue to increase with globalization. The policy agenda on remittances and that on migration overlap a great deal, but the overlap is not complete. Remittances provide the most tangible and least controversial link between migration and development. They can play an effective role in reducing poverty, and they provide a convenient angle for approaching the complex migration agenda.

China, Philippines and Indonesia, top remittance receivers in 2007

Michael Figueroa's picture

According to the Bank's recently published Migration and Remittances Factbook, the Top 10 remittance recipients in East Asia & Pacific in 2007 were: China ($25.7 bn), Philippines ($17.0 bn), Indonesia ($6.0 bn), Vietnam ($5.0 bn), Thailand ($1.7 bn), Malaysia ($1.7 bn), Cambodia ($0.3 bn), Mongolia ($0.2 bn), Fiji ($0.2 bn), Myanmar ($0.1 bn).

 


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