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Milanovic on Inequality (Continued): Implications for Politics, Alliances and Migration

Duncan Green's picture

In which, following on yesterday’s post,  Ricardo Fuentes and I decide to carry on chatting about the new Milanovic paper on inequality.

Duncan: Great intro to the Milanovic paper, Ricardo, but there’s plenty more juice to be had, I think. First let’s take a closer look at the graph you put up of change in global real income 1988-2008 (below). As well as the spike of the top 1% (and do we know whether the financial crisis has moderated or amplified the spike?), the bit that jumps out at me is the stagnation of incomes above the 75th percentile. For that portion of the world’s population in the top quarter of the income bracket, but below the super-rich 1%, the last 20 years have been pretty terrible.

Migration and post-2015 development goals

Dilip Ratha's picture

On the eve of the international migrants day, many people are debating how migration might feature in the post-2015 development goals. There is no doubt that migration - international and internal - affects several of the current MDGs: poverty, education, health of children and mothers, environment, gender, and also several elements of a global public good such a role in financial and natural crisis. Migration directly impacts the migrants, their families and their employers, and also impacts development indirectly. Development in turn impacts migration. There is no doubt that migration is a very important driver of development. And yet, since it directly challenges national identity and sovereignty, it is not easy to arrive at a consensus on specific migration targets.

Gangnam Migration: Regression-Discontinuity Impacts of Migrating to Korea

David McKenzie's picture

Several countries around the world (notably Australia and Canada) have migration points systems- score above some points threshold and you can come in, score below and you can’t. This has intrigued me with the possibility of a regression-discontinuity design to measure impacts of migrating. However, there are several problems – the points given tend to be lumpy (e.g.

Global Forum on Migration and Development 2012: Mauritius - What a great forum!

Sonia Plaza's picture

I just attended the Global Forum on Migration and Development (GFMD)in Mauritius last November 21 -22, 2012. It was the first time that the GFMD was chaired by an African country. It was also the first time that the World Bank was invited to be a presenter (we are only observers in these meetings) in the Round Table - Supporting Migrants and Diaspora as Agents of Socioeconomic Change, co chaired by France, Kenya and Morocco. The Bank also wrote jointly with IFAD and IOM the background paper for this session.
See paper.

Pakistan Remittance Initiative (PRI)

Najm-us-Saqib Shabbir's picture

In order to provide an ownership structure in Pakistan for remittance facilitation, State Bank of Pakistan (the central bank), Ministry of Overseas Pakistanis and Ministry of Finance launched a joint initiative called Pakistan Remittance Initiative (PRI) in early 2009. This initiative has been taken to achieve the objectives of (a) facilitating and supporting efficient flow of workers’ remittances and (b) catering for other financial services needs of Overseas Pakistanis and their families back home. 

Thank you for attending ... here's the presentation

Dilip Ratha's picture

Thank you to all who attended yesterday’s live seminar/webinar on the ‘Latest Trends in Migration and Remittance Flows Worldwide’. The session focused on the continued resilience of remittance flows to the developing world, and globally, despite the continued fallout from the global financial crisis. In my presentation, I reported on the latest trends in remittances and migration flows and discuss a new World Bank initiative on migration and development, the Global Knowledge Partnership on Migration and Development (KNOMAD).

Many of you have requested a copy of my powerpoint presentation from the session, so here it is.

Better Jobs Can Outweigh a Secure Life

Zahid Hussain's picture

People on a boat in BangladeshOn Nov. 7, 2012, a motorboat carrying 110 illegal immigrants heading for Malaysia capsized in the Bay of Bengal close to Bangladesh’s southeastern border with Myanmar. This tragedy came less than a fortnight after a boat with more than 135 passengers capsized in the same area. “Boat capsized with illegal immigrants from Bangladesh” is a recurring story, with Thailand, Malaysia, and other Southeast Asian countries the destinations of illegal work seekers. What makes Bangladeshis resort to such extreme methods of migration?


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