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opendata

Seeing Between the Lines: Visualizing Global Poverty Trends

Johan Mistiaen's picture

Last month, while World Bank President Jim Yong Kim launched the gender data portal, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton remarked that “data not only measures progress, it inspires it”.  Indeed when data is both relevant and effectively communicated, it can help to inform policies, identify challenges, and catalyze changes and innovations that deliver development results.

With that goal in mind, we started an Open Data Lab.  One of our objectives is to help the development community become more effective data communicators by experimenting with different data visualization techniques and tools.  The human brain finds it easier to process data and information if it is presented as an image rather than raw numbers or words.  And visualizations that let and encourage users to interact with data can deepen their understanding of the information presented. 

Your Top 5 questions about World Bank Open Data

Maryna Taran's picture

This page in Spanish | French | Arabic | Chinese

When the World Bank opened its doors and launched the Open Data Initiative two years ago, our Data Help Desk was flooded with questions, requests and comments from students, researchers, journalists, economists, statisticians and more. The demand for our data has only grown, and right now, our team answers around a thousand data-related queries a month by email and phone.

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Meet the World Bank Open Data Helpdesk Team

 

Data and Feedback for Development

Tariq Khokhar's picture

This post is authored by World Bank Managing Director Caroline Anstey and originally appeared on the Voices blog - please leave any comments there.

Even a cursory glance at the Internet would tell you there is a lot going on in the Bank on Open Development. Add in cutting edge approaches using SMS messaging by Think Tanks, CSOs and Foundations and you quickly see that mapping for results, crowd-sourcing, beneficiary feedback, and Open Data hold out enormous promise of leveraging technology for more effective development - as the technology grows and cheapens, we've all only begun to scratch the surface of its full potential.   

The Power of Open: Crowd-Sourced Ideas & Crowd-Powered Solutions

Samuel Lee's picture

#DDC2012 + #RHoK - The people spoke, financial data was published, and answers were developed.

What did you do this weekend? How was your weekend? For most of us, these are simple routine questions which often warrant rote and unrehearsed responses: “fine,” “great,” and perhaps even a nonchalant, “not bad.” However, those who took part in the World Bank Finances Development Data Challenge (DDC) on Friday and Random Hacks of Kindness (RHoK) on Saturday & Sunday were not only witness to but a part of an extraordinary series of events that displayed the power of crowd-sourced ideas and solutions. They might tell the story of an amazing three days, a story of collective passion, resolve, collaboration, and results. It is the story of how an idea was formed, empowered, and developed over what was collectively just over twenty-four hours.

The Top 5 Ways to Access World Bank Data

Tariq Khokhar's picture

So. You're looking for the World Bank's data. Here are the top 5 ways I access it, what are yours?

1) data.worldbank.org

Our most popular open data destination - the main World Bank Data site gives you an overview of the data we have on a country, region or topic. I like it because you can quickly browse and filter through many years of indicator data, make some basic charts and even embed them into your own web page. 

Unleash the power of open financial data – join the Development Data Challenge!

Samuel Lee's picture

This post comes from the World Bank Finances Team

The World Bank wants a “world free of poverty.” Facebook wants a world that’s more “open and connected.” Can we help realize both these dreams with open financial data? With ever more open data on the finances and activities of development organizations and governments available (and with much of that data becoming available in standard formats like IATI), how do we go beyond transparency and get to development impact?

Open Data and Mapping for Disasters and Development

Tariq Khokhar's picture

This post is a summary of one that appeared on the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery Site and was originally authored by Christina Irene.

"Openness is critical for inclusive development and a thriving civil society"

The above words from Suzanne Kindervatter of InterAction underscored the theme running through a unique gathering at World Bank headquarters in Washington on May 3, 2012. Almost 200 people from more than 70 organizations met for a half-day workshop on free and open source geographic information system―better known as GIS―mapping tools. Mapping experts and development professionals came together under the newly launched “GFDRR Innovation Series” –that brings together individuals and organizations that work on similar issues.

Open Data at the World Bank: 2 years old today

Shaida Badiee's picture

Today is the second birthday of the Bank's Open Data Initiative—announced by the Bank's President, Robert Zoellick on April 20th, 2010:

 

"It's important to make the data and knowledge of the World Bank available to everyone. Statistics tell the story of people in developing and emerging countries and can play an important part in helping to overcome poverty."

 

Infomediaries: Are Developers the New Truth Tellers?

Aleem Walji's picture

Andrew McLaughlin

 

 

 

Video of the event is now available on B-SPAN and YouTube

 

When it comes to statistics, most of us get glossy-eyed pretty quickly when we are listening to an esteemed expert review his or her findings. The exception perhaps is when we are told a compelling story that relates data to our lives. Journalists are not alone is helping us make sense of really complex issues -- software developers have an increasing role to play. 

 


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