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What do you think of the all-new data.worldbank.org?

Tim Herzog's picture

Check out the new World Bank Data site at http://beta.data.worldbank.org  - we'd love your feedback.


The new beta.data.worldbank.org

The Bank has been providing free, open access to its development data since the launch of the Open Data Initiative in 2010. Initially, we focused on the popular World Development Indicators data set, but we’ve added lots of datasets since then. But, apart from some changes to make some of the new datasets accessible, the website itself has stayed pretty much the same. That is, until this week!

Chart: Women More Often Work Unpaid in Family Firms

Tariq Khokhar's picture

Globally 55% of women participate in the labor force vs. 82% of men. In many countries, women are also more likely than men to be working without pay in family-owned business such as shops and farms. Read more in the World Bank's Gender Data Portal.

What exactly does “fewer women participate in the labor force” mean?

Masako Hiraga's picture

This year’s Gates Annual Letter focussed on energy and time. Bill Gates argued that cheap, clean sources of energy are fundamental to the future of human development, and Melinda Gates shone a light on how women spend their time, and how it’s spent and compensated differently than men’s. The letter is an excellent example of communicating complex issues clearly and in an engaging manner and we encourage everyone to read it.

While the topic is on people’s minds, we wanted to take the opportunity to clarify one of the charts they included based on “Labor force participation rates” data from our Gender Statistics Database.  
 
What the data show is that worldwide, in 2014, 55% of women participated in the labor force vs 82% of men. In every geographic region, the share of women in the labor force is lower. As the Gates letter notes, this can be attributed to cultural norms - responsibilities for cooking, cleaning and childcare disproportionately fall on women and keep them out of the labor force.
 

The labor force participation rate includes the unemployed and people working without pay

You can think of a “labor force” as the total pool of working-age people able to work in an economy. The labour force participation rate measures the proportion of a country’s working-age population that’s either working or looking for work.  What’s interesting about this statistic is that it includes unemployed people, and people who are working in both paid and unpaid jobs.

Bribery and limited access to banking are challenges for Afghan private firms

Arvind Jain's picture

The World Bank Group’s Enterprise Surveys benchmark the business environment based on actual experiences of firms. In a new blog series we kicked off last week, we’re sharing these findings from recently analyzed surveys conducted through extensive face-to-face interviews with managers and owners of firms in several countries.
 
In this post we focus on Afghanistan. We’ve conducted a survey with 410 firms across five regions and four business sectors—manufacturing, construction, retail, and services.

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has noted that considerable political and security uncertainties have posed challenges for Afghanistan. Furthermore, the financial sector has been vulnerable with eight out of 15 banks classified as weak in late 2014. Within this context, the Afghanistan Enterprise Surveys (ES) shed light on several interesting findings:

Corruption is a challenge

According to the Afghanistan Enterprise Survey, firms face almost a 50 percent chance of having to pay a bribe if they applied for an electricity connection, tried to obtain permits, or met with government officials for tax purposes (“Bribery incidence”).  This is more than double of what private firms in landlocked developing countries experience on average.
 

Chart: People in Fragile States Receive Higher Average Remittances

Tariq Khokhar's picture

Remittances – money sent back home by emigres – amount to a larger financial flow than development aid. Since 2000, remittance inflows per capita to fragile states have been higher than those to other developing countries.

Read more in the OECD's States of Fragility 2015 and access data on migration and remittances and data on population and remittances from World Development Indicators. Note the aggregations and data used in the chart above are made available by the OECD at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/888933185242

Access to finance is biggest challenge for firms in Namibia

Joshua Wimpey's picture

The private sector continues to be a critical driver of job creation and economic growth. However, several factors can undermine the private sector and, if left unaddressed, may impede development.  Through extensive face-to-face interviews with managers and owners of firms, the World Bank Group's Enterprise Surveys benchmark the business environment based on actual experiences of firms. A series of blogs, starting today, share the findings from recently analyzed surveys conducted in several countries.

The Namibia Enterprise Surveys consisted of 580 interviews with firms across three regions and three business sectors – manufacturing, retail, and other services. So what are some key highlights from the surveys?

Exports take on average 8 days to clear through customs but varies according to firm size
In 2013, it took a firm in Namibia about eight days to clear exports through customs, which is considerably more than the two days it took in 2006. Despite this increase, the average time to clear direct exports through customs is still about the same as in the upper middle income countries (8 days) and lower than the Sub-Saharan Africa regional average (10 days). Moreover, there is a wide variation across firm size. For a small firm, it takes about 17 days on average to clear exports through customs, compared to around six days for medium-sized firms and about two days for large firms.

Clearing imports, in contrast, through customs is considerably faster in Namibia (five days) than the average for upper middle income countries (11 days) and Sub-Saharan Africa average (17 days).


 

Chart: Women Earn More in Male-Dominated Jobs

Tariq Khokhar's picture

A recent study in Uganda found that women in female-dominated sectors earned less than half what men did in male-dominated sectors. But women who "crossed over" to male-dominated sectors such as metalwork and carpentry earned almost as much as men. Read more about "Breaking The Gender Earnings Gap" 
 

Where do women most lag men in access to financial institutions?

Masako Hiraga's picture

Where do women most lag men in access to financial institutions?

 


Globally, an average of 65% of men and 58% of women over the age of 15 have an account at a financial institution. However, beneath this 7 percentage point global difference, there are many countries where the gender gaps are much wider. Find our more in the Gender Data Portal and the Global Findex data portal.

 

Why are Indigenous Peoples more likely to be poor?

Oscar Calvo-González's picture

Indigenous Peoples face poverty rates that are on average twice as high as for the rest of Latin Americans. This fact is probably not a surprise to most readers of this blog. More intriguing, however, are three additional findings from recent work on the topic.

First, until recently, we did not have as robust quantitative evidence of such poverty gaps as that found in the recent World Bank report Indigenous Latin America in the Twenty-First Century. In fact, not all countries in the region have data on poverty by ethnicity and fewer still have the micro-data needed to understand the stumbling blocks that Indigenous Peoples face on the path out of poverty.

Second, the gap between the poverty rate of Indigenous Peoples and the rest of the population is not getting smaller. In some countries the gap remains stagnant and in others it is actually widening. Why are Indigenous Peoples benefiting less from growth and more likely to be poor? One way to explore these issues is to disentangle how much of the poverty gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations can be explained by factors such as that indigenous peoples tend to live in rural areas, have lower education, etc. The results of such analysis bring us to my final point, illustrated in the chart below.

Source: SEDLAC (World Bank and CEDLAS). Note: the bars represent the percentage of people living on less than US$4 per day 2005 PPP for indigenous peoples and the rest of the population. The poverty rates are calculated using late-2000s weighted average for Bolivia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico and Peru.
*Variables include characteristics of the head of the household (education, age, and gender), family composition (number of non-working members), geographical characteristics (country of residence, rural status) and employment characteristics of the head (sector of employment and occupation).

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