Syndicate content

PPP

The secret to a successful disclosure process is collaboration

Larry Blain's picture

Photo Credit: Thomas Hawk via Flickr Creative Commons

I worked with Partnerships BC on its disclosure policies for public-private partnerships (PPPs) for over a decade, and it’s a field that continues to be more interesting with each passing year. You read that right – this very legalistic area of the PPP process, with its formal, official requirements – continues to change, engage, and surprise. That’s because disclosure, at its core, depends on collaboration, and collaboration is all about trusting relationships.

Understanding institutional investors for infrastructure – The collaborative model

Rajiv Sharma's picture


One of the key objectives for our research program at the Stanford Global Projects Center is to understand how the largest sources of capital in the world can be channeled into critical infrastructure and development projects most in need of it. In particular, we focus on long-term institutional investors (pension funds and sovereign wealth funds) and private development firms at one end of the spectrum, and government procurement agencies and departments at the other. We are essentially trying to assist in overcoming a number of inefficiencies that seem to be apparent in linking the original source of capital to projects on the ground. In this blog post, we would like to highlight some of the latest trends and issues confronting the institutional investor space; in subsequent blogs, we will showcase some of the work we have done at the government procurement level to facilitate investment.

Delivering water and sanitation services in Niger: challenges and results

Taibou Adamou Maiga's picture

Niger is one of the world’s poorest countries (44.5% of poverty incidence in 2014). The country faces a number of challenges in meeting the national (PROSEHA, the National Program for sustainable development) and global targets to increase access to sanitation and potable water, particularly in rural areas where the access to water is 44.2% and 7% for sanitation (2015 Ministry of Water and Sanitation data).

Overcoming these challenges while satisfying increasing demands for better or expanded service, the government began investigating options that bring in the know-how of the private sector. This has led to a growing domestic private sector provision of services in Niger.

Financing the future of America's infrastructure through PPPs

Doug Maher's picture

Photo Credit: Mark Anderson via Flickr Creative Commons

If you live in urban areas – which, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, over 80% of Americans do – you know the feelings associated with traffic. Busy roadways and overcrowded public transit lines are just some of the many consequences of the increased need for infrastructure investment in the U.S. To grow sustainably, cities must continue to make major investments in infrastructure – across healthcare, transportation, utilities, buildings, energy and even within our industrial base.

Prioritizing infrastructure investments: Framework and forward momentum

Cledan Mandri-Perrott's picture


The Infrastructure Prioritization Framework (IPF) is a quantitative tool that synthesizes and displays financial and economic as well as social and environmental indicators at the infrastructure project level. Two composite indices or dimensions are displayed in a Cartesian plane to offer a simplified picture of comparative performance alongside the public budget constraint for a particular sector.
 

Prioritizing infrastructure investments: Panama’s long-term path to PPPs

Cledan Mandri-Perrott's picture


In Panama, a healthy economic climate and enthusiastic institutional support provided an ideal testing ground for the World Bank’s Infrastructure Prioritization Framework (IPF). The country’s GDP growth and economic buoyancy in 2014 motivated an ambitious public investment program, accompanied by a high number of infrastructure project proposals to the Ministry of Economics and Finance. Coupled with political commitment to narrow the deficit, Panama moved to implement select projects for a five-year strategic period.

Prioritizing infrastructure investments: Helping decision-makers do their job

Cledan Mandri-Perrott's picture

Government officials and PPP practitioners make difficult decisions about infrastructure projects all the time. But perhaps the choice they grapple with the most is which projects to select for implementation within a given investment period. Many factors come into play, such as government budget constraints, the relative efficiency and effectiveness of investments, as well as costs and benefits of projects to society. With so much to consider, governments need improved decision-making frameworks that are rigorous enough to accommodate multiple components but practical enough to remain feasible and affordable.

Rebooting Vietnam’s PPP program: Legislation that builds on lessons learned

Stanley Boots's picture

After over two years of development and drafting, Vietnam’s Decree 15 on Public Private Partnerships (PPP Decree) came into effect last spring. Dedicated specifically to the identification, preparation, and implementation of PPP projects, the PPP Decree replaced the largely unimplemented regulations for pilot PPP projects as well as the regime for build-operate-transfer (BOT), build-transfer-operate (BTO), and build-transfer (BT) projects. Almost a year after the PPP Decree was issued, it’s become clear that it has rebooted Vietnam’s potential for PPPs in a significant and lasting way. 

Vlog voice from the field: Reflecting on the Caribbean PPP bootcamps

Brian Samuel's picture

Past PPP Blogs introduced readers to the Caribbean Regional Support Facility, which ran a series of boot camp-style workshops to increase technical capacity among Caribbean government officials and achieve long-sought results. In our newest video blog from the field, Brian Samuel, a PPP Coordinator with the Caribbean Development Bank (and a former IFC staffer), explains how these PPP boot camps transformed talk into action. Brian's first installment of this series can be found here.

Harvard Kennedy School and IFC team up for senior training on PPPs and project finance

Isabel Chatterton's picture

I recently had the chance to get to know dozens of forward-thinking, dynamic individuals from the public and private sectors. Despite their varied backgrounds, resumes, and perspectives, they shared one thing in common: they have all been influential in shaping the Asia Pacific PPP landscape. Our gathering was part of the IFC PPP Transaction Advisory Services Unit’s four-day Senior Training Program on PPPs and Project Finance, in collaboration with the Harvard Kennedy School in Singapore.

All of the participants – government representatives, donors, private sector clients, World Bank and MIGA staff, as well as senior IFC staff -- offered a different view on how best to combat today’s global PPP challenges. We captured a few key insights from the training program to share with others:

Pages