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tigers

Where wild tigers roam

Anne Elicaño-Shields's picture
No tigers made an appearance but this little fellow emerged from across the stream while I was at a lookout tower in Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary, Thailand.

ภาษาไทย | Español

There are only about 250 tigers in the wild left in Thailand and around 3,200* globally. Not a single one made an appearance when I covered the Global Tiger Initiative’s Regional Training on the Smart Patrol System at the Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary but I learned more about tigers then than I ever did at a zoo.

From iconic species to iconic case studies

The World Bank Group’s twin goals of ending extreme poverty by 2030 and promoting shared prosperity can’t be achieved unless we see a huge boost in the quality and quantity of infrastructure services. Boost infrastructure and do it right and you can generate jobs and boost economic growth. Improving sanitation and access to clean water is essential to improve health outcomes. 
 
According to World Bank President Jim Yong Kim, “Today, the developing world spends about $1 trillion on infrastructure, and only a small share of those projects involves private actors. Overall, private investments and public-private partnerships in developing countries totaled $150 billion in 2013, down from $186 billion in 2012. So it will take the commitment of all of us to help low- and middle-income countries bridge the massive infrastructure divide.”
 
Public-private partnerships (PPPs) can be an important way for governments to help supplement the role of the public sector in meeting the infrastructure deficit.  But PPPs are controversial – there have been some high profile, expensive failures, and some stakeholders feel the private sector should not be involved in providing basic infrastructure services like water. 
 
On the flip side, many have over optimistic expectations for PPPs. PPPs are often not easy to do or to get right and governments need to make sure they are choosing projects suitable for the PPP approach. Through a variety of initiatives and collaboration with partners – including the world’s main multilateral lending institutions – we are helping clients better understand both the potential and limitations of PPPs, including helping them assess when a PPP is the right option and when it is not, and how to procure and manage these projects effectively.

Our free massive open online course (MOOC) – “How can PPPs help deliver better services?” – will help participants gain an understanding of when, how and why to implement PPPs, based on real examples of what has made for successful PPPs and what has led to failures. Students will gain insights into the PPP life cycle and its challenges, from project selection to implementation. Whether you are a PPP practitioner, policy maker or completely new to the subject of PPPs there is something here for you.

Three advances for tiger conservation for Lao PDR and beyond

Tony Whitten's picture
版本: English
出于各种原因,经济学家避免太过深入地涉猎文化概念及其与经济发展的联系。一种普遍的看法认为,文化在指导某一人群沿着某一特定路径前行方面发挥一定作用,但正如Landes(1998)指出的,因有可能被诠释为对某一特定文化的含蓄批评而引发的不愉快阻碍了更广泛的公众讨论。

正如我们在近期的一篇论文中所探讨的,文化对经济发展的作用并不是一个可以轻松涉猎的议题。首先,人们会碰到定义难题。定义越是包罗万象,其对阐释发展模式所起的帮助作用往往就越小。经济学家倾向于把文化的定义窄化为“族群、宗教团体和社会团体一成不变地代代相传的习惯性信仰”(Guiso、Sapienza和Zingales,2006)。这种定义方式侧重于在相当长时间内一成不变的文化构成要素,因而在很大程度上受识别因果联系这一宗旨所左右。不足为奇的是,在关于该议题的最有见地的著述中,有些是由人类学家撰写的。Murdock(1965)坚持认为,文化由某一团体的成员共同拥有的习惯构成,是学习而非继承的产物。Woolcock(2014)重点介绍了社会学研究如何演变为把文化视为“形成由人们制定‘行动策略’所依托的习惯、技能和风格构成的清单或‘工具箱’”(Swidler,1986,第273页)。

Experts give urgent call to save wild tigers

Tony Whitten's picture

Su nombre es Sarah. Usted vive en Nueva York, o tal vez en Nairobi, donde divide su tiempo entre cuidar a su familia y crear una pequeña empresa. Su vida es más cómoda que la de su madre, y las perspectivas de sus hijos son más favorables de lo que podría haber esperado. Hasta que un día su marido enfurece de celos y la golpea gravemente.

Poco después él está controlando sus llamadas telefónicas y sus movimientos, denigrándola y lastimándola. A veces se disculpa, y usted espera que las cosas mejoren. Pero cuando se entera de que va a abrir una cuenta bancaria a su nombre, le incendia su tienda, destruyendo su único camino hacia la independencia. ¿A quién puede recurrir, si sus amigos y familiares le dicen que es afortunada de tener un marido que trabaja, y la policía, los clérigos y los servicios jurídicos no la apoyan ni la amparan? Sus opciones son pocas y peligrosas, tanto para usted como para sus hijos.

Giving conservationists and nature lovers (some) reason to hope for the future

Tony Whitten's picture

It’s high time I write something which doesn’t seem to be the work of a manic-depressive. Many of my blogs have majored on the negatives, but I honestly wouldn’t be in this business if I didn’t have within me a deep-rooted hope for the future. As I have remarked before, conservationists are a wonderful band, but put a group of ebullient conservation friends together, and within half an hour the conversation has quieted down, turned grumpy, and you need to watch out in case any of them looks as though they are contemplating jumping from the office balcony or a handy cliff. We don’t celebrate the successes, or even the potential ones, enough. It’s a cliché to say that the war is being lost while battles are being won, but we should at least encourage each other with battle victory parties.

How cute do you have to be to be safe?

Tony Whitten's picture
A woman walks by an Ebola awareness sign in Freetown, Liberia. © Tanya Bindra/UNICEF
A woman walks by an Ebola awareness sign in Freetown, Liberia. ​© Tanya Bindra/UNICEF


As the spread of the Ebola virus in West Africa shows, the importance of reducing inequality could not be more clear. The battle against the virus is a fight on many fronts — human lives and health foremost among them.

But the fight against Ebola is also a fight against inequality. The knowledge and infrastructure to treat the sick and contain the virus exists in high- and middle-income counties. However, over many years, we have failed to make these things accessible to low-income people in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. So now thousands of people in these countries are dying because, in the lottery of birth, they were born in the wrong place.

If we do not stop Ebola now, the infection will continue to spread to other countries and even continents, as we have seen with the first Ebola case in the United States this past week. This pandemic shows the deadly cost of unequal access to basic services and the consequences of our failure to fix this problem.
The virus is spreading out of control in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. As a consequence, our ability to boost shared prosperity in West Africa — and potentially the entire continent — may be quickly disappearing.

Hot passion, tigers --and shoe shops

Tony Whitten's picture

The Bank is full of hot passion.  Indeed we are expected to fight passionately in our work, and for a small group of us recently the subject of that passion has been tigers.  Passion in the World Bank makes for noisy meetings, adrenalin and angst.