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vocational training

Vocational training vs. apprenticeships: A Ugandan showdown

Markus Goldstein's picture
Youth employment is a significant and pressing development issue.  But it’s not clear what governments can do.   There have been several metareviews of active labor market policies, including a recent one by David, and they’re fairly depressing – showing not much impact at all.    Into this fray, however, comes a new paper by Livia Alfonsi, Oriana Bandiera, Vittorio Bassi, Robin Burgess, Imran Rasul,

Biased women in the I(C)T crowd

Markus Goldstein's picture
This post is coauthored with Alaka Holla

The rigorous evidence on vocational training programs is, at best, mixed.   For example, Markus recently blogged about some work looking at long term impacts of job training in the Dominican Republic.   In that paper, the authors find no impact on overall employment, but they do find a change in the quality of employment, with more folks having jobs with health insurance (for example). 
 

Insights from Brazil for skills development in rapidly transforming African countries

Claudia Costin's picture
Young Brazilians learning hairdresser skills under a vocational program run by Sistema S
Young Brazilians learning hairdresser skills under a vocational program run by Sistema S.
Photo credit: Mariana Ceratti/World Bank

While Brazil faces a difficult fiscal and economic situation right now, I would like to view national progress on employment and incomes from a long-term perspective, which is valuable when addressing Education and Human Development issues in a broader sense.

New insights for Entra21 in Cordoba

Guillermo Cruces's picture

The past decade has wrought numerous studies on youth training programs, especially in Latin America and the Caribbean. However, little research exists on they operate and their effects beyond the labor market. We spoke with Guillermo Cruces, of the Center for Distributive, Labor and Social Studies (CEDLAS) at the Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina, about the Center's efforts to fill this hole by studying the Entra21 program in Cordoba in 2011-12.

Students in rural Argentina. Photo: Flickr@WorldBank (Nahuel Berger)

The Impact of Vocational Training for the Unemployed in Turkey: an inside look at my latest paper

David McKenzie's picture
My latest working paper (joint with Sarojini Hirschleifer, Rita Almeida and Cristobal Ridao-Cano) presents results from an impact evaluation of a large-scale vocational training program for the unemployed in Turkey. I thought I’d briefly summarize the study, and then discuss a few aspects that may be of more general interest.

The study

Brazil's dream goal for 2014

Mariana Ceratti's picture
Tamires Rodrigues, a Brazilian student, has some things in common with some of the world’s best strikers: she has, for example, a clear target and knows exactly how to send the ball straight into the goal.

Just as Tamires, Brazil wishes to score a dream goal – and it has got nothing to do with the upcoming World Cup. The country seeks to enroll 1 million people in the National Programme for Vocational Education and Employment (Pronatec, its acronym in Portuguese) until the end of 2014.

Vocational Training for Vulnerable Youth in Colombia

Jessica Owens's picture

With youth unemployment extremely high in Latin America, numerous government efforts have been under way to help the poorest individuals. In Colombia, the "Jóvenes en Acción" or "Youth in Action" program was introduced in the mid-2000s to provide job training to about 4,300 unemployed youth (ages 18-25) who lived in urban areas and fell into the two lowest deciles of the income distribution. Jessica Owens, a consultant with Colombia's Ministry of Labor, says that evaluations show that women fared the best under the program.

Should we believe the hype about adolescent girls?

Markus Goldstein's picture

There aren't that many development initiatives I know that have their own slickly produced video, sponsored by a major corporation, let alone a parody. But the "girl effect," which makes the argument that investing in adolescent girls is a great thing, is one.  


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