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World Cup 2014

Sport and Social Media: Perfect Partners for an Imperfect Climate

Leszek J. Sibilski's picture

From the melting snow of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics to the stifling heat of the Australian Open Tennis Championships in Melbourne, climate change is proving relentless.
So are we going to sit back and let it ravage our lives and love of sport? As a former member of the Polish National Olympic Team in cycling, I definitely hope not. Let’s unite the power of sport with the might of social media and face up to the world’s environmental enemy number one. 
Fact – temperatures are rising

According to the World Bank, Earth could warm from its current global mean temperature of 0.8°C above pre-industrial levels to as high as 4°C by 2100.
What does that mean? More extreme heat waves, causing global health, socio-political and economic ramifications. The President of The World Bank is calling for action to hold warming below 2° C. The question is, what can we do?

If You’re Watching the World Cup, You Don’t Want to Miss This

Michelle Pabalan's picture
Team Burundi, Great Lakes Peace Cup
“Sport has the power to change the world. It has the power to unite in a way that little else does.”
- Nelson Mandela

Even though I didn’t grow up watching football, admittedly I’ve developed an interest in the sport during this month-long emotional World Cup soap opera. And like me, millions of people will be glued to their television sets for this Sunday’s finals match between Argentina and Germany. 
Above and beyond the superstars, the fans and controversies, I learned more about how this beautiful game is used to build communities, overcome social and cultural divides and advance peace. It seems sports have a way of changing the lives of people around the world - but what does this exactly look like?

And The Top Goal Scorers of the 2014 World Cup Are…Migrants!

Christian Eigen-Zucchi's picture
The 2014 World Cup is shaping up to be a goal fest, with an average of 3 goals per game so far (20 out of 64 matches played).  You would have to go back to 1958 to find an average of 3 goals or more per game.  Who are the players scoring all of these dazzling goals?  Most are migrants.  A goal scorer is deemed to be a migrant if he is thought to be living in a country outside his country of birth, as indicated by playing for a club outside his country of birth.  This is regardless of whether the national team being represented is the same as the country of birth.

In order to highlight the contributions of migrants, we will keep a running tally of goals scored by migrants and non-migrants in the chart below.  The more detailed file is available here.  Check back and see how they are doing as this exciting World Cup reaches its climax!
Top Goal Scorers of the 2014 World Cup