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youth engagement

What do young people think about climate change?

Max Thabiso Edkins's picture
Youth and Future Generations Day at COP21
Youth and Future Generations Day at COP21. Photo: Connect4Climate


On December 3, 2015, hundreds of young people gathered at the United Nations Conference on Climate Change (COP21) to join leaders and share their voices on climate change. The day was marked as the ‘Young and Future Generations Day,’ a chance for young people to have a seat at the table and share how they would define our future. Young people today are growing up with effects of climate challenge and this immediate threat makes them more leaders of today rather than tomorrow.

Helping youth engage with the global climate talks

Max Thabiso Edkins's picture
 
#Youth4Climate taps social media to give young people a voice in the upcoming COP21 in Paris
#Youth4Climate taps social media to give young people a voice in the upcoming COP21 in Paris
Today’s youth are the first generation to come of age amid climate change, and they have the most at stake to do something about it. The World Bank Group is joining with a network of partners to help young people around the world engage in the upcoming UNFCCC climate talks, which take place in Paris from November 30 to December 11, 2015.
 

Weekly Wire: the Global Forum

Kalliope Kokolis's picture

These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.

Brookings
Communication Technologies: Five Myths and Five Lessons from History

“Mobile phones in the developing world have myriad uses: banking services, reminders for medicine regimens, e-governance, and more. This is a far cry from a generation ago when 99 percent of the people in low-income countries lacked POTS, or “plain old telephone service.”

Information and communications technologies are now indispensible for development, prioritized through varying levels of market-driven measures and participatory politics.  From international organizations to local administrations, the importance given to these technologies for development today is a counterpoint to the immediate post-colonial era when telephones were considered a luxury and nationalized radio broadcasting was used for bringing “modern” ideas to populations. Along with policy changes, the move toward market forms works to ensure that people have phones and access to communication infrastructures, in turn providing incentives for entrepreneurs and political brokers to develop applications for delivery of social services and provide alternatives to users who in an earlier era lacked even basic access to these technologies.”  READ MORE