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Education

L'Afrique et les objectifs de développement pour le Millénaire

Shanta Devarajan's picture

Learning the Queen's English ... on your mobile phone?

Michael Trucano's picture

the infrastructure is increasingly there ... how can we take advantage of it? | img attribution at bottomMuch lip service is paid in various quarters to the potential use of mobile phones in education in developing countries.  That said, concrete examples of such use -- especially projects that have gone beyond small initial pilot stages -- remain few and far between. This is beginning to change.  One interesting project can be found in Bangladesh, where the BBC World Service Trust and BBC Learning English are implementing the Janala project, an initiative that is providing English language lessons to citizens via their mobile phones as part of the wider English in Action program in Bangladesh, funded by the UK's Department for International Development (UKaid).

Some of people involved with the Janala project recently shared some information about what they have been doing -- and learning -- as part of a discussion series at USAID around 'mobile education' topics (the other project presented in the latest session was the MILLEE project, which has been profiled on this blog before).  I was fortunate enough to be be able to sit in on the presentation, at the kind invitation of USAID educational technology team, and thought I'd share some brief highlights:

Final Countdown: Top 10 Common Errors when Building a World-Class University

Jamil Salmi's picture

This is my last post sharing the top 10 common errors when building new world class universities based on my work over the past 17 years at the World Bank and reflecting on my observations from  working with colleagues involved in advising countries keen to establish new tertiary education institutions.  A full version of the lessons can be accessed at Ten Common Errors When Building a New World-Class University

8. Be too ambitious in enrollment targets.  The leaders of new institutions sometimes think that they can rapidly enroll large numbers of students, often in the tens of thousands.  This is rarely achieved without sacrificing quality.  In the 1970s, E.F. Schumacher wrote in his famous book “Small is Beautiful” that successful development projects were preferably of a small size. 

India's $35 Tablet Computer: A Pill for Poverty?

Antonio Lambino's picture

Recently featured in the news was a 35 USD version of Apple’s iPad that the Indian government hopes to mass produce by 2011.  India also hopes to bring the unit price down to around 10 USD.  If successful, this initiative could bring an affordable, mobile, multiple application device within reach of lower income families in poor countries.  CNN’s Fareed Zakaria expressed the opinion that a fully-functioning 10 USD computer “could change the world” similar to the way in which satellite dishes and mobile phones have in the past.  I think implicit in Zakaria’s point is the belief that information and communication revolutions have the potential to increase productivity and enhance human development.  But this potential rarely leads to an actual breakthrough.  Due to a host of factors in addition to price (see, for instance, Michael Trucano's post), what might perhaps be called “socio-technological epidemics” tend to be few and far between, especially in poor countries.  There is a difference, of course, between a predominantly commercial success and one that really contributes to development results.

Leadership Challenge: Common Errors when Building a World-Class University

Jamil Salmi's picture

This week, I’m sharing the top 10 common errors when building new world class universities based on my work over the past 17 years at the World Bank and reflecting on my observations from  working with colleagues involved in advising countries keen to establish new tertiary education institutions.  We started with the magnificent campus and expectation that magic will come from it, followed it with the errors related to the curriculum, content and the overall ecosystem within which universities exist.  Today, we delve into some other common errors, here are common errors 5, 6 and 7. 

5. Delay putting in place the board and appointing the leadership team.  The resolution to establish a new university is often a political decision reflecting a visionary ambition at the highest levels that a ministry or a technical project team is then charged with putting into action.  This typically leads to a centrally managed design and implementation process. 

Countdown of Common Errors when Building a World-Class University

Jamil Salmi's picture

No Steps leading to front doorThis week, I’m sharing the top 10 common errors when building new world class universities based on my work over the past 17 years at the World Bank and reflecting on my observations from  working with colleagues involved in advising countries keen to establish new tertiary education institutions.  Yesterday I focused on the magnificent campus and the expectation that magic will come from it; today, I delve into some other common errors when building a world class university.  Here are common errors number 2, 3 and-4. 

2. Design the curriculum after constructing the facilities.  It is often assumed that teaching and learning can easily adapt to the physical environment of the institution.  This may be true for traditional lecture-based teaching, but innovative pedagogical practices often require equally innovative facilities.For example, interactive approaches, problem-based learning or pedagogical methods relying heavily on teamwork and peer learning are constrained by the physical limitations of conventional lecture halls or even classrooms. 

Growing Pains: Ten Common Errors when Building a World-Class University

Jamil Salmi's picture

Tower of BabelDrawing inspiration from the recent post on the World Bank EduTech Blog by Michael Trucano on "worst practices in ICT in education" I was prompted to compile a list of common errors when attempting to build new world-class universities posted on the Inside Higher Education World Views Blog a few weeks ago. Over the next few days, I’d like to share a more extended version of these common errors, reflecting on my observations from  working with colleagues involved in advising countries keen to establish new tertiary education institutions.  I am especially indebted to Richard Hopper for giving me the opportunity to learn a lot and for contributing “error number 6”.  I would also like to thank Roberta Malee Bassett for her insightful comments and helpful suggestions.  Last but not least, I am grateful to Richard Miller, Founding President of Olin College in Massachusetts and Shamsh Kassim-Lakha, Founding President of Aga Khan University in Karachi, for sharing their wisdom and invaluable experience in the most generous manner.

One Mouse Per Child

Michael Trucano's picture

red mouse green mouse orange mouse blue; the one you choose is up to youMuch popular attention has been paid to the so-called "$100 laptop" initiative and other programs to provide "1-to-1 educational computing" to students in developing countries. Even at $100 dollars per device, however, such solutions are still much too expensive for most communities around the world. Indeed, the typical scenario for computer use in schools in developing countries, and especially in rural areas, is for multiple children to crowd around one computer while one child controls the mouse, leaving the other children as onlookers.

Of free classrooms and ubiquitous laptops

Mamata Pokharel's picture

How many of you have used Youtube to learn new things? I know I have. It was on Youtube that I discovered two young instructors from Iowa, who I have to thank for my basic salsa moves. When I bought a new camera, I turned to Youtube to give me some tips and send me on my way. And of course, if I ever need to learn how to survive a zombie attack, or how to become a ninja, I know I can depend on Youtube to impart those very important skills.


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