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Education

Two young Indian girls blog about their interaction with Sri Mulyani Indrawati

Apoorva Devanshi's picture

 Sri Mulyani Indrawati speaking to the students at MNIT, India
“India has the maximum number of young people and these young people will enter the labor market in the next two decades.” These words by the World Bank’s Managing Director and Chief Operating Officer Sri Mulyani Indrawati at the Malaviya National Institute of Technology campus, Jaipur, on September 23, 2015, had all of us listening with rapt attention.

How to boost student learning in South Asia

Amit Dar's picture

The Sustainable Development Goals ( SDGs)—a set of international targets adopted by the international community last September at the United Nations—recognizes the central role that quality education for all plays in global development.
 
In South Asian countries, raising the quality of education is already a key policy objective given the development trajectories of these countries and the human capital they need to sustain economic growth.
 
While school enrollment in South Asia has significantly increased in the last two decades, access to quality education for all remains elusive. A major obstacle to achieving the SDGs by 2030 in South Asia is that vast numbers of children who are in school are not acquiring even basic skills such as reading and numeracy.
 

School feeding: A tool for social inclusion

Andy Chi Tembon's picture
Photo Credit: Andy Tembon / World Bank


October 16 is World Food Day, a day when people come together to declare their commitment to eradicate hunger within a lifetime.

Many school-age children across the globe depend on school feeding programs for morning and mid-day meals.  School feeding programs incentivize parents to keep children in school and provide students the essential nutrients to stay healthy and able to learn. 

Can you buy results in education?

Jessica Lee's picture
Photo: Maria Fleischmann / World Bank

These days, Results-Based Financing (RBF) is a sexy term in the development world, with more and more projects focused on linking financing to pre-determined results. Just this past May, World Bank President Jim Kim committed to double results-based financing for education to US$5 billion over the next five years.
 
The Results in Education for All Children (REACH) trust fund aims to boost global knowledge in RBF, through research and operations. Supported by Norway, Germany, and USAID, it finances Knowledge, Learning, and Innovation (KLI) grants and country program grants.

"Every time I see a problem, I create a social business to solve it"

Marta Milkowska's picture

(c) Marta Milkowska“Every time I see a problem, I create a social business to solve it,” renowned Nobel Prize laureate Muhammad Yunus said to an overflowing room at the World Bank Group’s Headquarters in Washington, DC this summer. “Set up a social business.”

“The poor are like Bonsai trees,” the founder of Grameen Bank explained, “When you plant the best seed of the tallest tree in a six-inch-deep flower pot, you get a perfect replica of the tallest tree, but it is only inches tall. There is nothing wrong with the seed you planted; only the soil-base you provided was inadequate. Poor people are bonsai people. There is nothing wrong with their seeds. Only society never gave them a base to grow on."

Virtually no digital natives

Siddhartha Raja's picture

There is a huge gap between a child playing with a smartphone and a young adult who is capable of manipulating that technology to make an income, or to create a business. Assuming that today’s young people are digital natives seriously risks equating the ability to consume media with the ability to participate in the digital economy. Education systems need to ensure that young students and workers are prepared to capture the benefits that smarter machines and connectivity will bring. Accepting this responsibility, and not assuming that young people everywhere are naturally able to access and participate in the digital economy, will be a critical first step.

In Lima, inequality debate focuses on women, youth, and taxes

Donna Barne's picture
Paraisopolis, São Paulo, Brazil. © Tuca Vieira


​Can we end extreme poverty in a world with extreme inequality? That question inspired a spirited debate in English and Spanish on Oct. 7, just ahead of the World Bank Group-IMF Annual Meetings in Lima, Peru, addressing corruption, taxation, discrimination against women, and the need to even the playing field for the younger generation.

Latin America’s experience with inequality was front and center at the live-streamed event, Inequality, Opportunity, and Prosperity, featuring World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim, Ibero-American Secretary General Rebeca Grynspan, Oxfam International Chair Juan Alberto Fuentes Knight,  and moderated by CNN Español news anchor Patricia Janiot.

Climate change and e-Learning: a virtual success story

Neeraj Prasad's picture
Computer class at ENA school for distance learning in Cocody, Abidjan.
Photo: Ami Vitale / World Bank


The past month was full of climate-related stories in the media, including speeches by the Pope in Washington DC and New York, the joint China-US statement, and the announcement of China’s cap-and-trade scheme starting 2017.

We may still hear about differences of opinion on what is causing climate change and what needs to be done and by whom, but it is happening, and that efforts to resolve these differences are made in conventions and meetings, in houses of Congress, in media or public debate.


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