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Environment

It’s Heating Up: Industry Needs Climate-Friendly Policies to Keep Cool and Competitive

Etienne Kechichian's picture


Emiko Kashiwagi / Flickr

Industries account for nearly one-third of direct and indirect global greenhouse-gas emissions, and they will be playing an increasingly important role in achieving the global targets expected to be set at the international climate summit in Paris in December. For example, the cement (5 percent), chemicals (7 percent) and iron and steel (7 percent) sectors account for nearly one-fifth of all global greenhouse-gas emissions, and those sectors have significant potential to reduce those emissions.
 
Tackling climate change by focusing on industries has long been a contentious issue. Some industries claim that regulation will impede economic growth by imposing additional burdens on competitive sectors. In some cases, they have an argument; but, if it is designed well and adapted to the context, a smart and timely intervention can influence a socially and economically positive systemic change.
 
Many businesses themselves, by pursuing cost-effective, long-term, environmentally sustainable production, long ago realized that “going green” can be highly advantageous, and they have been taking a pro-active approach toward addressing the issue precisely because it makes business sense. One group of global business leaders – including Unilever, Holcim, Virgin Group and others – have taken their commitment further by encouraging governments to lend their support for net-zero emissions strategies by 2050.
 
Even in developing countries, companies like Intel are investing millions of dollars in energy efficiency to save on current and future energy costs. The company has already saved $111 million since 2008 as a result of $59 million worth of sustainability investments in 1,500 projects worldwide.
 
  

Source: New Climate Economy 2014; World Bank World Development Indicators 

The sentiment that climate action by both the private sector and the public sector is urgent was also an important theme highlighted by World Bank Group President Jim Kim during January's World Economic Forum conference in Davos. Mitigation measures, such as energy-efficiency policies, have long been seen as a way to improve profits and manage risks. The logic for energy efficiency, a key set of abatement actions by the manufacturing sector, is there.
 
The recent New Climate Economy initiative, produced by the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate, estimates that at least 50 percent – and, with broad and ambitious implementation, potentially up to 90 percent – of the actions needed to get onto a pathway that keeps warming from exceeding 2°C could be compatible with the goal of ensuring the competitiveness of industries.

Global citizens call and act to end pollution

Andy Shuai Liu's picture
Earth Day serves as a reminder each year that protecting the environment and working toward a cleaner, healthier planet not only benefits people nowbut also helps us leave a safer home for future generations. This year, nearly 300,000 people from all walks of life took to the U.S. National Mall in Washington D.C. on April 18 to mark the day as “global citizens” rallying for people and the planet.

Musicians, politicians, and non-profit leaders joined thousands of people to emphasize a message that relates both to poverty and environmental concerns:

Pollution kills and it hits the poor the hardest. To protect our lives and our planet, we must act now to end pollution.  

The World Bank talked to people at the event to see what types of pollution they see around them and what actions, however small, they take to reduce pollution on a daily basis.

Get inspired by their words and actions:
 
Patrick Quackenbush. Photo by World Bank

“I see pollution more in the air and water—in the creeks and in the sea. Pollution brings damage to nature and animals’ habitats. 

“I walk a lot. A lot of people may drive, but I am used to walking on campus. Subconsciously, it makes me feel I’m contributing [to the cause of ending pollution].”

– Patrick Quackenbush, a student at the University of Maryland

#EarthDay: Floods, droughts and extreme heat threaten the Arab World

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Postcard

If the earth gets much hotter this century, life will get harder for most people across the world. But how much harder will it be for people in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), a region already known for its heat and aridity? For many, climate change evokes thoughts of bitterly cold winters, burning hot summers, long droughts, and spectacular floods. But for MENA, climate change will also mean the loss of traditional incomes, forced migration and a constant struggle to make ends meet. Earth Day is a moment to examine the link between the impact of climate change on nature and humankind.

Campaign art: Lend a helping hand on Earth Day

Roxanne Bauer's picture

People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

Earth Day, celebrated annually on April 22, seeks to raise awareness and support for environmental protection.

2015 is the 45th anniversary of Earth Day and the theme this year is "It's our turn to lead," raising hopes that people can lead by example in protecting the environment so that world leaders might follow.  The Earth Day Network is hoping that 2015 will be the year "in which economic growth and sustainability join hands."  

Greenpeace, a non-governmental environmental organization working to "ensure the ability of the Earth to nurture life in all its diversity", campaigns on global issues like climate change, deforestation, the health of the oceans, and ecological farming. The following video, like this year's call to action, encourages us all to lend a helping hand.
 
VIDEO: Earth Day: Give Earth a Hand


Wanted! Your proposals on Regional Integration in South Asia

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Home to Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka, South Asia is one of the fastest growing regions in the world and yet one of the least integrated. Intra-regional trade accounts for only 5% of South Asia’s GDP, compared to 25% of East Asia’s. Meanwhile, with a population of 1.6 billion, South Asia hosts one of the largest untapped talent pools.

To encourage young researchers in the region who aspire to use their research to inform policy making, the World Bank Group calls for research proposals on South Asia regional integration. Proposals will be carefully reviewed and the most suitable proposals (no more than five overall) will be awarded with a grant based on criteria listed below. An experienced researcher from the World Bank’s research department or an external academic will mentor and guide the young researcher in the implementation of the research.[1]

At the end of this process, the expected output is a paper meeting rigorous academic standards and at a stage suitable for presentation and debate in academic seminar/workshops/conferences. In particular, the insights from the research are expected to be presented and discussed during World Bank sponsored events.

This call is open to PhD students who have already completed their Ph. D. coursework and young economists who have recently completed their PhD (by 2010 or after).[2]  

The criteria for the grant are as follows:

A Food System that can feed everyone, everyday, everywhere

Juergen Voegele's picture



Whether you’re a food producer or consumer, and no matter what part of the world you live in, I’m sure we can agree: The world needs a food system that can feed everyone, everyday, everywhere.

A food system that works for everyone can also create jobs and raise the incomes of smallholder farmers and rural residents who are 78 percent of the world’s poor people. After all, growth originating in agriculture is proven to be 2 to 4 times more effective at reducing poverty than growth originating in other sectors. An effective food system can also provide better nutrition, steward the world’s natural resources, and even be a part of the solution to climate change.
 

If you want to go far, go together

Jana Malinska's picture

A new global network of Climate Innovation Centers will support the most innovative private-sector solutions for climate change.
 
Pop quiz: What does an organic leather wallet have in common with a cookstove for making flatbread and a pile of recycled concrete?
 
Believe it or not, each of these represents something revolutionary: a private sector-driven approach to climate change. Each of these products – yes, even concrete – is produced by an innovative clean-tech company. And as of March 26th, those businesses, and hundreds more like them, have something else in common. They’re connected through infoDev's newly established global network of Climate Innovation Centers (CICs), an innovative project that is taking the idea of green innovation beyond borders.
 
Having piloted the CIC model in seven different countries – Kenya, South Africa, the Caribbean, Ethiopia, Morocco, Ghana and Vietnam – it was time for infoDev, a global entrepreneurship program in the World Bank Group’s Trade and Competitiveness Global Practice, to follow a time-honored business practice: to scale up and take this movement global.

And so, as part of last month’s South Africa Climate Innovation Conference, we joined forces with 14 experts from the seven different countries where the CICs operate to establish the foundations of the world’s first global network devoted to supporting green growth and clean-tech innovation.



CIC staff debate and discuss the new CIC Network during the South Africa Climate Innovation Conference.

This global network of Climate Innovation Centers – business incubators for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – has been designed to help local ventures take full advantage of the fast-growing clean-technology market. The infoDev study “Building Competitive Green Industries” estimates that over the next decade $6.4 trillion will be invested in clean technologies in developing countries. An even more promising fact is that, out of this amount, about $1.6 trillion represents future business opportunities for SMEs, which are important drivers of job creation and competitiveness in the clean-tech space.

What, exactly, is a fossil fuel subsidy? A review of valuation approaches

Masami Kojima's picture
Half a trillion dollars? Two trillion dollars? “Only” 85 billion? Widely-differing numbers have been cited in recent years for global fossil fuel subsidies, making policy evaluation and consensus-building on reform challenging. Different definitions for subsidies, the boundaries of review, and the methods for calculating subsidies are responsible for the large differences and have contributed to the confusion.

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