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Urban Development

Standing for women’s land and property rights in Kosovo

Albena Reshitaj's picture
 

Women’s property rights are an important development issue, not only for women’s empowerment but to also improve human capital outcomes for families – for example, improved children’s health and higher education outcomes.


In Kosovo, the World Bank-financed Real Estate Cadastre and Registration Project (RECAP) took on the issue of women’s property rights head on. Under the project, the implementing entity – the Kosovo Cadastre Agency (KCA) – reprogrammed the country’s land information system to produce gender-disaggregated property ownership data. The data revealed that women’s ownership was close to 12% in 2010 and increased to just under 17% by 2018. Together, the KCA and the Agency for Gender Equality created a program to register joint ownership of marital property between spouses free of charge.

Several public awareness activities helped raise the profile of the issue and advance the agenda of women’s property rights in Kosovo. The KCA continues its work on promoting women’s property rights, and such activities will be supported in the World Bank’s Real Estate Cadastre and Geospatial Information Project (REGIP).

Watch a video with Albena Reshitaj, Political Advisor to the Prime Minister of Kosovo, and Aanchal Anand, Land Administration Specialist to learn more about Kosovo’s commitment to empowering women in decision-making and its efforts to promote women’s property rights nationwide.

Chongqing 2035: Shifting away from quantity to quality to build sustainable cities in China

Xueman Wang's picture

Urban architecture and skyline of Chongqing, China. (Photo: 4045 / iStock)

​Chongqing, the largest municipality in China, is investing in sustainable urban growth.

As China transitions from pursuing high-speed growth at any cost to a growth model that focuses on sustainability, inclusivity, and efficiency, cities like Chongqing are a critical part of this new urbanization strategy.

Making Pakistan more equitable for all

Silvia Redaelli's picture
Between 2001 and 2015, approximately 32 million people were lifted out of poverty
Photo: World Bank

This blog is part of a series that discusses findings from the [email protected]: Shaping the Future report, which identifies the changes necessary for Pakistan to become a strong upper middle-income country by the time it turns 100 years old in 2047. 

In recent years, Pakistan has made remarkable progress in reducing poverty. Estimates based on the national poverty line, which was set at Rs3,030.3 per adult equivalent per month based on 2013-14 prices, show a consistent decline over the past two decades.
 
Between 2001 and 2015, approximately 32 million people were lifted out of poverty and the poverty rate was more than halved, going from 64 percent in 2001 to 24pc in 2015. However, a lot is yet to be done.

Not only because 2015 estimates show that approximately one in four Pakistani still does not have enough money to satisfy basic needs, but – even more alarming – progress has been far from equal when looking across the provinces, districts, cities, and rural areas.
 
While poverty declined at a fast pace in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and, to a lesser extent, in Punjab, progress was less positive in Sindh and Balochistan.
 
Within provinces, poverty has remained stubbornly high in Southern Punjab and Northern Sindh. Similarly, the pace of poverty reduction has been slower in rural areas compared to cities, where the risk of poverty is less than half compared to rural areas.

Inequalities in poverty levels and poverty reduction performance are compounded by substantial inequalities in access to and quality of basic services such as health, education, electricity, water, and sanitation.
 
Being born in one of the country’s lagging areas and/or in a poor family largely predetermines a child’s chances of escaping deprivation and realizing his or her full human capital potential in life.

Cities for the people

Abhas Jha's picture
Singapore Chinatown - Lois Goh / World Bank

Overcrowded, dirty, and disorderly cities undermine residents’ health as much as their happiness. With urbanization occurring at an unprecedented rate, there is an urgent need for careful planning, collaboration, communication, and consensus.

SINGAPORE – Dante’s Divine Comedy describes one level of hell (the City of Dis) as“Satan’s wretched city … full of distress and torment terrible.” He could well have been describing many modern-day metropolises.

The world, especially Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia, is experiencing a massive wave of urbanization. And yet it is occurring largely in the absence of urban planning, with even those municipalities that attempt to create plans often failing to enforce them effectively or account properly for the needs of the majority. The result is overcrowded, dirty, and disorderly cities that undermine residents’ health and happiness.

Why does people-centric design matter for sustainable cities?

Gerald Ollivier's picture
 


By 2050, urbanization – combined with the overall growth of the world’s population – could add another 2.5 billion people to urban areas by 2050. Close to 90% of this increase will take place in Asia and Africa. While this bodes well for economic agglomerations, many cities are constrained by livability.  Pressure on land resources and urban space is immense in Asia and Africa, with high population densities, leading to congestion, low-quality urban environment, pollution, and low safety.

The core long-term solution to such challenges requires land use and physical planning at different scales, from the national level to the metropolitan, city, neighborhood, and all the way down to the street level. Such an approach can ensure a functioning labor market where a maximum number of jobs can be reached by all citizens, while creating inclusive, livable, and vibrant urban areas.

Two approaches to building sustainable cities

Cyclone Idai: Building climate and disaster resilience in Mozambique and beyond

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
Mozambique after Cyclone Idai. Photo by Denis Onyodi / IFRC / DRK / Climate Centre via Flickr CC

Cyclone Idai is one of the most devastating storms to ever hit Africa, causing catastrophic damage in Mozambique, Malawi, and Zimbabwe.
 
Starting off in early March 2019 as a tropical depression, the storm rapidly evolved into a cyclone, affecting over 2 million people and killing close to 1,000 in the three countries affected. The port city of Beira, Mozambique – the hardest hit – is struggling to reemerge from the rubble.

Introducing a video blog series on tackling fragility, conflict, and violence in Africa

Aly Rahim's picture
 


More than 300 million people in Africa live in countries affected by fragility, conflict, and violence (FCV). Half of the 36 countries on the World Bank’s Harmonized List of Fragile Situations are in Africa. In West Africa, in particular, a surge in conflict since 2010 has sparked concerns.

How can we use analytical approaches to generate urban climate investments in Africa?

Prashant Kapoor's picture
As the world rushes to reduce the negative impacts of climate change, ambitious sub-national actors are rising to the fore. The recent One Planet Summit exemplifies this trend. Earlier this month, urban leaders joined CEOs, financial institutions, researchers, Heads of State, and more in the adoption of the Africa Pledge, calling for immediate voluntary actions and a specific commitment to invest in sustainable infrastructure across the continent. After all, the infrastructure investments we make today set the agenda for how cities will grow in the future.

For example, Sub-Saharan Africa is largely rural, but is also the region with the fastest urbanization rates. Currently, almost 40 percent of the people live in cities in Sub-Saharan Africa, but this is expected to grow to 60 percent or more by 2050. So while urbanization provides economic and social opportunity, it can overburden traditional municipal resource and service delivery approaches.
 
Figure 1: Urban and Rural Population Growth Rate - excluding high income countries (Source: World Development Indicators)

Keeping it clean: Can blockchain change the nature of land registry in developing countries?

Sebastian Kriticos's picture

The global economy is constantly exposed to disruptive technologies. Take the example of telecommunications: it was not long ago that everything revolved around landlines. Households would go to great lengths to ensure they were well-serviced with fixed-line infrastructure, while those left out endured long travel times for everyday activities like managing a business or connecting with family and friends. Those days are a bygone era. The mobile phone changed everything.  

Why should Ethiopians care about urbanization? Jobs, infrastructure, and formal land and housing

Abebaw Alemayehu's picture


Ethiopia is still predominantly a rural country, with only 20% of its population living in urban areas. But this is set to change dramatically.

Figures from the Ethiopian Central Statistics Agency, project the urban population is will triple to 42.3 million by 2037, growing at 3.8% a year. According to the 2015 Ethiopia Urbanization Review, the rate of urbanization will be even faster, at about 5.4% a year. That would mean a tripling of the urban population even earlier—by 2034, with 30% of the country’s people in urban areas by 2028.


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