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Ci-Dev

Senegal pilots carbon finance to connect people to power

Kirtan Chandra Sahoo's picture
Also available in: Français | Español
Mrs. Sokhna Ndaw shows us her fridge in Dioly village, based in the community of Diokoul Mbelbouck in the region of Kaffrine.

In March 2016, some colleagues and I visited several villages around Kaffrine in Senegal where private companies had been awarded licenses to provide electricity on a commercial basis. As we spoke to people, two things became very clear. The initial cost of connection to the grid was too high for many poor people, and the cost of electricity offered by the private companies (or “concessionaires”) were in several cases higher than what the government-owned utility offered in nearby areas.

Senegal pone a prueba el financiamiento del carbono para conectar a las personas a la electricidad

Kirtan Chandra Sahoo's picture
Also available in: English | Français
La Sra. Sokhna Ndaw nos muestra su heladera en la aldea de Dioly, ubicada en la comunidad de Diokoul Mbelbouck en la región de Kaffrine.

En marzo de 2016, visité junto con unos colegas varias aldeas de la región de Kaffrine, en Senegal, donde se han otorgado licencias a empresas privadas para que suministren servicios comerciales de electricidad. Las conversaciones que mantuvimos con los habitantes nos permitieron llegar a dos conclusiones muy claras. El costo inicial de conexión a la red era demasiado elevado para muchas personas pobres y el costo de la electricidad que ofrecían las empresas privadas (o “concesionarias”) era, en varios casos, más alto que el del servicio ofrecido por el Gobierno en zonas aledañas.

Le Sénégal met à l’essai le financement carbone pour fournir l’accès à l’électricité

Kirtan Chandra Sahoo's picture
Also available in: English | Español
Madame Sokhna Ndaw nous montre son réfrigérateur dans le village de Dioly, basé dans la communauté de Diokoul Mbelbouck dans la région de Kaffrine.

En mars 2016, mes collègues et moi nous sommes rendus dans plusieurs villages dans la région de Kaffrine au Sénégal, où des compagnies privées avaient obtenu des licences commerciales de fourniture d’électricité. Deux faits sont ressortis clairement de nos discussions avec la population locale. Le coût initial du raccordement au réseau était un problème de taille et dans plusieurs cas, le coût de l’électricité fournie par les compagnies privées (ou « concessionnaires ») était plus élevé que celui de la société publique d’électricité dans les zones voisines.

Making carbon finance work for the poor

Rachel Kyte's picture

During this week in Durban, we announced two new financial initiatives designed to help the least-developed countries access financing for low-carbon investments and enable them to tap into carbon markets after 2012 - the Carbon Initiative for Development (Ci-Dev) and the third tranche of the BioCarbon Fund (BioCF T3).

The funds, focused on agriculture and access to energy, are designed to strengthen links to private sources of capital via carbon markets for some of the world's poorest communities.

The new instruments will help client countries to buy carbon credits from a range of projects including household biogas systems in Nepal, cook stoves in Africa, reforestation in the Democratic Republic of Congo, soil carbon in Kenya, and municipal solid waste in Uganda.

Ci-Dev, aiming to raise USD 120 million, is a partnership of donor and recipient countries, where public and private sector are pledging their support to capacity building and carbon market development in the poorest countries of the world.

The second initiative, the BioCF T3, will focus on reforestation and agriculture projects.

The agriculture projects are another example of the climate-smart agriculture we have been talking about all week – and deliver a triple win of increased food security and resilience through reduced soil erosion and increased land fertility as well as the access to new carbon markets.