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Climate Change

Five Film4Climate films to inspire you in 2017

Lucia Grenna's picture



It’s just one month into 2017, and for many,  that means they have just launched their New Year’s resolutions. The gym is still crowded, your refrigerator is still full of healthy food, but that initial motivation may not be as high as it was on, say, January 2. So, it’s time to find new sources of motivation and even inspiration for keeping that New Year’s resolution. One place to find that inspiration is the Film4Climate competition. If you’re trying to find a reason to persevere through whatever new challenges you are finding, look no further than the winners of this competition. All these films put things in a unique perspective.

The five winners in the short film category really can be your springboard for an inspiring 2017.

Senegal pilots carbon finance to connect people to power

Kirtan Chandra Sahoo's picture
Also available in: Français | Español
Mrs. Sokhna Ndaw shows us her fridge in Dioly village, based in the community of Diokoul Mbelbouck in the region of Kaffrine.

In March 2016, some colleagues and I visited several villages around Kaffrine in Senegal where private companies had been awarded licenses to provide electricity on a commercial basis. As we spoke to people, two things became very clear. The initial cost of connection to the grid was too high for many poor people, and the cost of electricity offered by the private companies (or “concessionaires”) were in several cases higher than what the government-owned utility offered in nearby areas.

Senegal pone a prueba el financiamiento del carbono para conectar a las personas a la electricidad

Kirtan Chandra Sahoo's picture
Also available in: English | Français
La Sra. Sokhna Ndaw nos muestra su heladera en la aldea de Dioly, ubicada en la comunidad de Diokoul Mbelbouck en la región de Kaffrine.

En marzo de 2016, visité junto con unos colegas varias aldeas de la región de Kaffrine, en Senegal, donde se han otorgado licencias a empresas privadas para que suministren servicios comerciales de electricidad. Las conversaciones que mantuvimos con los habitantes nos permitieron llegar a dos conclusiones muy claras. El costo inicial de conexión a la red era demasiado elevado para muchas personas pobres y el costo de la electricidad que ofrecían las empresas privadas (o “concesionarias”) era, en varios casos, más alto que el del servicio ofrecido por el Gobierno en zonas aledañas.

Le Sénégal met à l’essai le financement carbone pour fournir l’accès à l’électricité

Kirtan Chandra Sahoo's picture
Also available in: English | Español
Madame Sokhna Ndaw nous montre son réfrigérateur dans le village de Dioly, basé dans la communauté de Diokoul Mbelbouck dans la région de Kaffrine.

En mars 2016, mes collègues et moi nous sommes rendus dans plusieurs villages dans la région de Kaffrine au Sénégal, où des compagnies privées avaient obtenu des licences commerciales de fourniture d’électricité. Deux faits sont ressortis clairement de nos discussions avec la population locale. Le coût initial du raccordement au réseau était un problème de taille et dans plusieurs cas, le coût de l’électricité fournie par les compagnies privées (ou « concessionnaires ») était plus élevé que celui de la société publique d’électricité dans les zones voisines.

2016: A unique opportunity to get it right on forests and climate change

Ellysar Baroudy's picture
Moniz Phu Khao Khouay, Vientiane Province
Forest monitoring efforts in Phu Khao Khouay, Vientiane Province, Laos PDR. Photo credit: Hannah McDonald

If ever there was a year to make significant progress on forest conservation and climate change, it was 2016. Coming on the heels of the historic COP21 Paris Agreement, 2016 was a year to demonstrate the commitment the World Bank Group has to support countries as they take forward their nationally determined contributions to address our global climate change challenge. It’s gratifying to look back on 2016 and feel that we contributed to harnessing this momentum and sense of urgency; especially in showing how sustainable land use, including sustainable forest management, is critical to achieving the ambitious targets set out in the Paris Agreement.

Making the links between carbon markets in a post-Paris world

Thomas Kansy's picture



We are witnessing a pivotal moment in a decades-long effort to combat climate change. Last year in Paris, world leaders came together for the first time to commit to keeping global warming below 2°C. With the Paris Agreement in force and negotiators at COP22 in Marrakesh teasing out the details of implementing the Agreement, countries are developing their action plans (or Nationally Determined Contributions, NDCs) to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. Part of this is looking at how carbon assets could be traded across borders.

Scaling innovation for climate change

Jonathan Coony's picture
Current and planned Climate Innovation Centers - Credits: infoDev

We were standing at ground zero in the fight against climate change, looking at a still body of water and talking. Our group was gathered along the edges of a “farm pond,” a technique used by farmers to enhance agricultural resilience to climate change, which often impacts countries through crippling droughts. A farmer demonstrated the measures he had taken to protect his livelihood from the extreme weather events that were increasingly common in his region.

New climate finance model in Morocco rewards low-carbon policies

Venkata Ramana Putti's picture
 Koza1983


Morocco, the host of COP22 happening this week and next in Marrakech, is an example of a country that is working closely with the World Bank and other organizations to shift its economy onto a low carbon development path.

It just submitted its official climate plan, or nationally determined contribution, NDC, where it pledges a 42% reduction below business-as-usual emissions by 2030. This is 10 percentage points more ambitious than it previously laid out, ahead of Paris, and we see the plan affecting a growing number of sectors in the economy. Morocco plans a $13 billion expansion of wind, solar and hydroelectric power generation capacity and associated infrastructure that should see the country get 42% of its electricity from renewable sources by 2020, ramping up to 52% by 2030.

Québec earmarks carbon-market revenues to stir innovation

David Heurtel's picture
Electric school bus. Photo credit: Autobus Lion

By advancing towards our ambitious GHG reduction target – 37,5 % of 1990 levels in 2030 – Québec demonstrates that proactive States and Regions are part of the solution to fight climate change. To address this challenge, we have decided to set up a carbon market linked with California through the Western Climate Initiative in 2014. In 2017, our carbon market will also be linked with Ontario. Last August, Québec and Mexico signed a joint statement to affirm their desire to widen their collaboration on cap-and-trade. Jurisdictions have many options when it comes to earmark their carbon-pricing revenues; Quebec’s choice, to entirely reinvest the revenues of its carbon market in climate actions, shows that we really understand the urgency of acting immediately and boldly. Thanks to CPLC’s leadership and knowledge-sharing initiatives, we now have an additional opportunity to share our stories and learn from each-other’s experiences with carbon pricing.

As the Paris Agreement becomes reality: How to transform economies through carbon pricing

Laura Tuck's picture


The remarkable pace at which nations of the world have ratified the Paris Agreement on climate change gives us all hope. It signals the world is ready to take the actions we need to keep global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius. We know, however, that delivering on Paris comes with a high price tag, and that we need to help countries not just transition toward renewable energy but unlock the finance needed to get there.

Amid the enormous challenge ahead, I want to emphasize the transformative economic opportunity that putting a price on carbon pollution presents.

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