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  • Reply to: Lighting rural Bangladesh with rooftop solar & carbon credits   3 days 17 hours ago

    Sir,I think your power pack system is so expensive.
    150$ even after subsidy means rediculas. 1kv solar system for rooftops may be around 1500$,which may provide 2fans,5lights and TV, mobile charger for entire family, uninterruptedly.NO battery in the world work for 20 yes.

  • Reply to: Lighting rural Bangladesh with rooftop solar & carbon credits   4 days 4 hours ago
    Thank you for your question and concern about the resilience of Bangladeshis to climate-related events. It is an issue we are very concerned with, especially considering the vulnerability to climate change of the very poor. The Bangladesh Solar Home System program featured in this blog was designed to focus on the mitigation aspects of climate change, mainly by replacing kerosene with solar power. We are not aware of any algorithms that make the direct connection between SHS and resilience and/or adaptation to climate change at this point, however.
     
    The World Bank Group has been working closely with other international and national development institutions to improve the resilience of communities and ecosystems to climate change and we are in the process of developing indicators to measure resilience on the national level. In Bangladesh, specifically, we are financing a system of storm shelters in schools that provide refuge during typhoons. Also, the Global Facility for Disaster Risk and Recovery and the World Bank Group are supporting the strengthening of weather and hydrological information systems in a number of countries, which are key to building disaster and climate resilience, including for cities in Bangladesh and other areas flooded during the monsoon. Furthermore, as of August 2014, all World Bank Group projects financed by IDA include resilience screening. We hope these measures will help strengthen the resilience of countries to the severe impacts of climate change.
  • Reply to: Lighting rural Bangladesh with rooftop solar & carbon credits   4 days 4 hours ago

    As to "A 20 watt-peak system costs about US$150, which is paid by the users over three years and provides enough electricity to power two lights and one mobile charger"

    Somewhat surprised that it is this high a cost for the system as the prices have been plummeting so much (is the cost heavily associated with the costs for managing the loan/etc?), however it would be good to place this within a context in several ways:

    1. How much would a 'typical' Bengali household pay for kerosene and for charging their phone(s) w/out the solar? I have seen figures in the range of $10/month for the kerosene. (For example, http://getenergysmartnow.com/2009/05/08/lighting-up-the-developing-world/)
    2. Related: If this is being partially paid for with carbon credits, is the $150 the cost to the consumer, total cost of the system, ...?
    3. The system is paid off in three years. How many years will it last?
    4. Great that w/Grameen Shatki & WB that there is carbon credit support to a bundling of household systems. Is there a clear discussion of the process (time, resources, etc ...) that was gone through to get this approved as a POA that can help similar distributed solar programs secure similar support?

  • Reply to: Lighting rural Bangladesh with rooftop solar & carbon credits   4 days 4 hours ago
    Thank you for your questions.

    1. How much would a 'typical' Bengali household pay for kerosene and for charging their phone(s) w/out the solar?  
    The payment for kerosene used for lighting is around 1-2% of the monthly incomes of Bangladesh households. (IFC report, pg 54) Considering that the average monthly household incomes in Bangladesh is 11,480 Taka/month (Bangladesh Household Income and Expenditure Survey, 2010), the monthly expenditure on kerosene is estimated to be around 115-230 Taka or approx. USD 1.5-3.
     
    2. If this is being partially paid for with carbon credits, is the $150 the cost to the consumer?
     The carbon credits are allocated to the Partner Organizations (POs) to expand the systems installation and scale up the program. The end-users pay a total of USD 150 for the 20 Wp solar home system through various financing options. The price takes into account the subsidy by IDCOL. 
     
    3. How many years will it last?
    The typical lifetime of a solar panel is 20 years while the lifetime for battery that stores the power is 5-10 years depends on how well the system is maintained. Currently, customers receive a free 3-year warranty for annual maintenance.
     
    4. Is there a clear discussion of the process to get this approved as a POA that can help similar distributed solar programs secure similar support?
    The Bangladesh Solar Home System PoA has potential to be replicated. In the streamlined CDM process under the UNFCCC, future PoAs are expected to require less time for the CDM regulatory process
  • Reply to: Lighting rural Bangladesh with rooftop solar & carbon credits   4 days 7 hours ago

    Concerning cost, I imagine given that we are speaking of photovoltaic panels the big expenses (oprating cost) is not the panels as such but the battery pack and controller. I am wondering does the amortization over 3 years include reserves so that battery packs that only have a limited lifecycle can be replaced? How is the financing of the battery replacement organized? Is there some sort of recycling/reconditioning/lease program?