Syndicate content

Blogs

Kinky development and the growth fetish

Emre Özaltın's picture

If you want to see exemplified the contrast between the old World Bank and the new – where we came from and where we are going – you need look no further than the recent pronouncements of Prof. Lant Pritchett.

As a new member of the World Bank, and one who spent a long time before joining considering whether the values of this institution matched my own, I have followed Prof. Pritchett’s blog and attended his recent talk with interest. Apparently I am not the only one; the standing-room only presentation generated much lively discussion.

Mozart seduces the World Bank and the IMF

Patrick Kabanda's picture
Something curious happened recently at the D.C. enclaves of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Mozart, no less, seized hold of the two institutions. The 18th-century Austrian composer emerged with his Grand Mass in C minor, K. 427, engulfing the modern glass and steel halls of the Bank and the Fund. The outcome was nothing less than a majestic and glorious sound — in the name of development.
 

Two essay competitions for students: One hosted by the International Economic Association, the other by Georgetown University

LTD Editors's picture
Students at higher education institutions worldwide who are studying full time can earn cash prizes for their writing skills, but deadlines are looming.

The International Economic Association (IEA) is holding its first Stiglitz Essay Prize (SEP) in honor of Joseph E. Stiglitz, its past association President. The topic must cover one of two broad themes:
  • The causes and policy consequences of growing inequality
  • A rethinking of macro-economics and proposals for new approaches that speak to the weaknesses in modelling revealed by the 2008 global crisis

The short-listed essays will go to the following judges: Joseph E. Stiglitz (Columbia University and IEA past President), Timothy Besley (London School of Economics and IEA President) and Kaushik Basu (World Bank Senior Vice President and IEA President Elect).

The winner of the prize will win US$1,000, and the runner(s)-up will receive US$500. The winning essay and runner(s) up will also be published on the IEA website.

The deadline for submissions is Sept 1, 2015. More information on the competition can be found here.

Friday round up: The shifting trade landscape, world water report, states of fragility, new PPP database, and heads up on Global Findex

LTD Editors's picture

New book entitled Power Shifts and New Blocs in the Global Trading System examines the possible consequences of the shifting trade landscape.

2015 edition of the United Nations World Water Development Report (WWDR), came out March 20. Entitled Water for a Sustainable World, the report demonstrates how water resources and services are essential to achieving global sustainability.

​What is a fragile state?

Anne-Lise Klausen's picture
Much like Tolstoy’s quip that each 'unhappy family is unhappy in its own way', a fragile state is fragile in its own way (see this paper, by the World Bank’s Michael Woolcock for more). Therefore, it is all too often unhelpful to reduce the definition of fragility to standardized, static lists or indicators – in so doing, we miss the complexities and nuances of fragility in some situations, and miss other fragile situations all together.
 

Uncovering implicit biases: What we learn from behavioral sciences about survey methods

Sana Rafiq's picture
Last year, I was in Nairobi, Kenya, along with some of my colleagues from the World Development Report (WDR) 2015, Mind, Society, and Behavior. We were there to set up the data collection efforts for a four-country study. One of the goals of this study was to replicate results from lab experiments that suggested poverty is a context that shapes economic decision-making amongst households.

Addressing inequality through shared prosperity: Guest video blog

Manny Fassihi's picture
One of the great opportunities of the Global Futures initiative is to help spread some of the big ideas about development and to make them more accessible to a global audience. Given our privileged access to some of the world's biggest thinkers on these issues - namely, World Bank President Jim Kim and Vice-President and Chief Economist Kaushik Basu - I saw an opportunity to translate key points from their lectures into animated visuals.

Pages