Syndicate content

How the Business Community Can Help Fight Corruption

Kaushik Basu's picture

This blog appeared originally in The Times of India

The control of corruption is commonly treated as the responsibility of government. The presumption is that people, firms and corporations will be what they are. So if corruption flourishes in a country, it reflects a failure of government. In informal discussions in the bazaar and angry public forums, the demands are invariably for greater honesty among government servants, tougher laws, and better enforcement. The public outrage against corruption is understandable for corruption is among the biggest obstacles to economic development. At the same time, the solutions offered in popular discourses are often naïve. 

Estimating the Economic Cost of Ebola

Mark Roland Thomas's picture
Recent news of declining numbers of new Ebola cases in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone suggest encouraging progress toward ending the epidemic. The human cost has been tragic and until we reach zero cases the threat to human lives remains the main risk and so the public health response must remain our focus. Yet, as Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone glimpse – we hope – light at the end of the tunnel, thoughts also need to turn to their needs for reconstruction and development.

Mind, Society, and Behavior – and Financial Inclusion

Douglas Randall's picture

This is an except from a post that appeared originally on The World Bank Group's 'Private Sector Development' blog.

Like many World Bankers, I took some time recently to look through the newly released 2015 World Development Report “Mind, Society, and Behavior.” From my perspective, in the Finance and Markets Global Practice, one thing jumped out immediately: The report is packed with insights that are directly relevant to our work on financial inclusion.

Chicken parties and other ways the poorest people raise money

Leora Klapper's picture

From Ghanaians who pay others to take their cash away to Peruvians who invite friends round for chicken, a World Bank survey reveals unusual ways to save.  This is an except from a post that appeared originally on The Guardian's 'Global Development Professionals Network' blog.

It was a pretty dry question: “Imagine that you have an emergency and you need to pay £1,300. How possible is it that you could come up with £1,300 within the next month? Is it very possible, somewhat possible, not very possible, or not at all possible? Would you use a credit card, dip into your savings, or ask your employer, friends or family for help?”

For a year and a half, we’d been using our questionnaire to measure how people manage their money around the world: Bangladesh, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Tanzania. The answers were useful, and we were building up a fascinating global picture . . .

What did Firms in Madagascar Experience?

Joshua Wimpey's picture
The goal of the Enterprise Surveys (ES) is to evaluate the quality of the business environment in the economy by asking a set of questions that capture both the experiences and perceptions of firms. This provides much needed information given how little is known about what businesses experience in developing economies. Below we provide highlights of the recently released data for Madagascar.  

Friday round up: Basu op ed, Grading the Gates' annual letter, the most powerful new tool in the history of social activism, study of solar lanterns, 6 new studies by JPAL and IPA on microcredit

LTD Editors's picture
The State of Global Poverty’ is the title of a Project Syndicate commentary by Kaushik Basu. As opinion leaders and heads of state convene in Davos, Basu reflects on the world’s rapidly changing economic geography and what it will take to get extreme poverty virtually to zero by 2030.

Fiscal Policy: Cycle and Space Matter

Otaviano Canuto's picture

I am among those economists who have argued that expansive fiscal policy has been missing as a lever to support recovery in advanced economies, especially in the Eurozone – see here and here

At the same time, I have cast doubts on recent attempts of using it to prop up growth in some emerging markets – see here and here in the case of Brazil. 

Measuring poverty dynamics without (actual) panel data: Could we square the circle?

Hai-Anh H. Dang's picture
Motivated by the success of the Millennium Development Goal that saw the global poverty rate in 1990 halve before 2015, the international community has multiplied its efforts to reduce poverty further. For example, the World Bank recently raised the bar by proposing that the global extreme poverty rate be reduced to 3 percent or less by 2030. This ambitious goal would no doubt require stronger efforts by all stakeholders on every battle front of poverty reduction, including the (perhaps less glorious) one of poverty measurement. 

The big economic view, Brazil, the utility of economists, slow trade, and consumption floors

LTD Editors's picture
Following a disappointing 2014, developing countries should see an uptick in growth this year, according to the latest Global Economic Prospects report. But low oil prices and a stronger US economy will not be enough to counter renewed bouts of financial market volatility and worries about diverging monetary policies across major central banks. On top of that, measures are needed to recover fiscal space in developing countries.

Pages