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Beyond building products – changing hearts and minds to actually use them

Marta Milkowska's picture
They were everywhere — blown-up condoms flying around as balloons in a small village in southern Kenya. A day earlier volunteers from an international NGO came to the village to promote family planning. They held a daylong workshop for women and thoroughly described the risks of lack of sexual protection. The next day, the volunteers left, and the village was covered with flying condom-balloons. It was 2007 and I was just about to learn how typical that story was. In the months that followed, I saw cookstoves being used as shelves and mosquito nets as football goals. So what went wrong?

How can we better support social entrepreneurs to improve service delivery?

Cristina Navarrete Moreno's picture
A mobile health solution in Kenya that has given 1,000 mothers access to high-quality diagnostics and medical advice. An off-grid energy solution in Uganda that has brought clean energy to 100 rural developments. A sanitation center in South Africa that has improved hygiene for more than 2,000 families living in urban slums.
 

10 Policy Tools that Governments Are Implementing to Spur Social Enterprise

Belen Sanchez's picture
Governments around the world are recognizing the potential of Social Enterprises (SEs) in order to build more inclusive social and economic agendas. For instance, the Government of the United Kingdom is praising innovative solutions of social enterprises as a vehicle to close the gap on the provision of public services, such as education and health.

Procuring Social Impact

Cristina Navarrete Moreno's picture
Governments around the world, especially in economies such as Australia, Canada, South Korea, and the United Kingdom, are discovering how buying from a social enterprise is one of the easiest and most effective ways of generating social value that can help break the cycle of poverty and improve social cohesion. Through the powerful economic force of public procurement, goods and services are bought from social enterprises with a strong track record of delivering added social value.

The Business of Doing Good: Supporting the Social Enterprise Sector

Elaine Tinsley's picture
When I talk about my work in social entrepreneurship, people often ask, “Why is the World Bank interested in social enterprises?” I let numbers answer the question.
 
Over one billion people don’t have access to the health services they need, 783 million people live without clean drinking water, and 780 million adults lack basic reading and writing skills. There are too many unserved needs as the bottom of the pyramid and there is just not enough public funding to provide these services.
 

Part 1: Five principles to behavior change: Why don’t they use these toilets?

Marta Milkowska's picture
They were simply not used. A few dozen toilets constructed in a small village in India worked well, except the villagers were not using them. Some conversations later, researchers discovered what had been overlooked during the planning phases: the morning open defecation practice was the only social activity for local women, otherwise spending all their time under the guardianship of their husbands. It was the highlight of their day, the time when they could freely talk, laugh, and gossip without the constraint of men and their day to day life.

To foster youth energy into social enterpreneurship in Egypt, government and international organizations are necessary

Rania Salah Seddik's picture

(c) World Bank GroupYoung Egyptians have an amazing potential that is not yet being utilized. We have a well-established business sector, but with the establishment and success comes an aversion to trying new things. To innovating. While the business sector has made incredible impact on my country, there are still gaps. Gaps in jobs and gaps in services that would allow our most marginalized citizens to escape poverty. This is where entrepreneurs, especially young ones, can help.

Addressing the silence around menstruation through partnership and positive association

Jaydeep Mandal's picture

As urban India strives to emerge as the next superpower, rural India continues to suffer in the absence of access to adequate health and hygiene facilities.

Hygiene and health go hand-in-hand. Maintaining proper hygiene is indispensible for maintaining good health and this holds true for women undergoing menstruation. Although menstruation is a natural process, there are several misconceptions and practices, which sometimes results in adverse health outcomes. In India, the problem is much more prevalent and accentuated in rural parts of the country. Lack of awareness and the stigma around menstruation causes women to refrain from seeking medical advice. Serious infections are often left untreated. Women across our country are forced into silence, and thus, into unhealthy behaviors.

In order to create the necessary behavior change needed to ensure healthy menstruation practices we strictly do not touch the myths and taboos connected with menstruation. Given that many of these taboos are connected to local cultures and religions, addressing these taboos would create a barrier to open discussion as target communities could feel under attack. Forming a positive discussion around how menstruation is normal, can be clean, and providing multiple options for sanitary pads for these women is far more impactful than shame.

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