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Rainforest-for-carbon-credits save Ulu Masen forest from conversion into palm oil plantation

Michael Figueroa's picture

 The World Wildlife Fund recently announced a new report that documents deforestation on the island of Sumatra, Indonesia.  WWF partnered with Hokkaido University an

Matching governance demand and supply

Naazneen Barma's picture

For over a decade, the World Bank has emphasized the centrality of good public sector governance and anticorruption efforts in achieving sustainable development impact in low- and middle-income countries.  But more recently the Bank has widened its analytic and operational lens on governance to include what is being called the “demand-side” of governance.  What does this mean, and what are the implications for Bank work in its client countri

Burgeoning carbon offset industry in East Asia

Michael Figueroa's picture

New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg was at the World Bank’s Washington, DC headquarters last Thursday to speak on elements of the Big Apple’s success in attracting “the free, global movement of labor, capital and ideas.”  Bloomberg noted that New York has joined more than 700 other American cities in pledging to meet Kyoto protocol standards for carbon reduction – in sharp contrast to the current U.S.

Should there be common standards for Sovereign Wealth Funds in Asia?

James Seward's picture

Sovereign Wealth Funds (SWFs), government owned investment vehicles typically funded by foreign exchange surpluses or natural resource revenues seem to be in the news about everyday.  Their massive size, rapid growth, and high-profile investments in the U.S.

China, Philippines and Indonesia, top remittance receivers in 2007

Michael Figueroa's picture

According to the Bank's recently published Migration and Remittances Factbook, the Top 10 remittance recipients in East Asia & Pacific in 2007 were: China ($25.7 bn), Philippines ($17.0 bn), Indonesia ($6.0 bn), Vietnam ($5.0 bn), Thailand ($1.7 bn), Malaysia ($1.7 bn), Cambodia ($0.3 bn), Mongolia ($0.2 bn), Fiji ($0.2 bn), Myanmar ($0.1 bn).

 

Is China de-linking from the U.S. economy?

David Dollar's picture

The year 2007 was an important milestone in modern economic history.  While the U.S. grew well, China contributed more to global GDP growth than the U.S. did.  That pattern is likely to continue for the foreseeable future.  Roughly speaking, the U.S. economy is about four times the size of China’s.  If the U.S.

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