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Indonesia

Tiga pelajaran penting dari Tsunami 2004

Abhas Jha's picture
Also available in: English



Pada dasarnya saya adalah orang yang pragmatis, mengingat awal karir saya sebagai petugas kelurahan, lanjut terus ke kecamatan, di India, ketika saya bertanggungjawab untuk banyak hal yang terjadi di lapangan, mulai dari persediaan air hingga rencana penggunaan lahan pertanian. Namun saya sangat sedih dan terpukul menyaksikan dampak dari bencana tsunami 2004. Di Indonesia saja, sekitar 220.000 orang kehilangan nyawa.

Three key lessons from the 2004 Tsunami

Abhas Jha's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia



I began my professional career as a sub-district and district level administrator in India-a position that makes one responsible for pretty much everything- from making sure the water comes out of the taps and the garbage is collected in the morning to helping pull accident victims out from horrific accidents and facing down stone-pelting mobs. This early experience of being thrown into the deep end of the pool gives me a somewhat pragmatic sense of perspective and equanimity. But I still recall the horror and overwhelming grief that I felt when the full impact of the 2004 Tsunami started becoming clear. In Indonesia alone approximately 220,000 people lost their lives.

Video Blog: World Bank Vice President for East Asia and Pacific visits Indonesia

Axel van Trotsenburg's picture
Video Blog: World Bank Vice President for East Asia and Pacific visits Indonesia


Axel van Trotsenburg, World Bank Vice President for East Asia and Pacific, travelled to Indonesia, where he visited the capital Jakarta and Makassar in South Sulawesi. He noted that Indonesia faces a large challenge in meeting infrastructure needs, in order to provide basic services and integrate a country with over 17,000 islands.
 

We Children Can Help Other Children Too

Mateo Fernandez's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia



​Hi, my name is Mateo. I am 9 years old. Every night my mom reads me a story.  Many times she tells me a story about how some boys are fortunate to be born rich, and some are not. My mom always reminds me that I am among the fortunate.  My mom helps a program called the Program Keluarga Harapan that teaches less fortunate mothers to educate their kids. The less fortunate mothers work extra hard, because they want their children to have a better future than them.

Ketika Anak-Anak Membantu Sesama

Mateo Fernandez's picture
Also available in: English



Halo, nama saya Mateo. Umur saya 9 tahun. Tiap malam Ibu selalu membacakan cerita. Katanya di dunia ini ada anak-anak yang beruntung karena lahir dari keluarga mampu, ada pula yang tidak. Menurut Ibu saya termasuk di antara mereka yang beruntung. Ibu bekerja membantu sebuah program yang diberi nama Program Keluarga Harapan. Program ini membantu mengajarkan para ibu dari keluarga tidak mampu bagaimana mendidik anak-anaknya. Ibu dari keluarga tidak mampu harus bekerja ekstra keras, karena mereka mau anak-anaknya punya masa depan yang lebih baik.
 

Refleksi Reformasi Guru di Indonesia

Andrew Ragatz's picture
Also available in: English


Pada tahun 2005, saya merasa beruntung berada di Indonesia saat upaya reformasi guru dimulai. Parlemen Indonesia menetapkan sebuah undang-undang komprehensif mengenai guru disertai agenda yang besar. Program utamanya adalah sertifikasi yang bertujuan meningkatkan kesejahteraan sekaligus kualitas guru secara signifikan. Guru yang telah menerima sertifikasi akan menerima gaji dua kali lipat. Syarat sertifikasi adalah memiliki gelar S1 serta kompetensi untuk memberikan pendidikan yang berkualitas.

Semua bahan untuk melakukan perubahan besar sepertinya tersedia. Regulasi yang bagus, dan upaya yang dipimpin seseorang yang mengepalai sebuah direktorat baru di Kementerian Pendidikan dengan mandat khusus untuk meningkatkan kualitas guru dan staf pendidik.

Reflections on Indonesia’s teacher reform

Andrew Ragatz's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia


In 2005, I had the great fortune of being in Indonesia just as its major teacher reform effort was beginning to take off.  Indonesia’s parliament had passed a comprehensive law on teachers, along with its ambitious agenda. Its signature program of certification intended to dramatically improve both teacher welfare and quality.  Certified teachers would receive a doubling of salary, and certification was to require that teachers hold a four-year degree and demonstrate possession of competencies necessary to provide good quality education.
 
The key ingredients for major change seemed in place.  Good legislation, and an effort led by a dynamic champion who headed a newly established directorate in the Education Ministry, with the specific mandate of improving the quality of teachers and of educational staff.
 

ASEAN Cooperation is Crucial to Global Food Security

Bruce Tolentino's picture


There is clear and present danger that another global food price crisis will emerge sooner than later. 

A key signal is the lackluster result of the December 2013 Ministerial meeting of the World Trade Organization (WTO) in Bali, Indonesia - in the heart of the ASEAN community. 

The compromises arising from the WTO Bali meeting further demonstrates that many WTO member-nations have returned to a focus on internal domestic politics, sacrificing long-term gains shared across nations, in favor of short-term gains motivated largely by domestic political survival or sheer short-sightedness.

Video Blog: World Bank Vice President for East Asia & Pacific on his Visit to Central Kalimantan, Indonesia

Axel van Trotsenburg's picture
Video Blog: World Bank Vice President for East Asia & Pacific on his Visit to Central Kalimantan, Indonesia

World Bank Vice President for East Asia & Pacific Axel van Trotsenburg talks about his visit to Central Kalimantan as part of the World Bank's support for the REDD+ initiative. 
 

East Asia and Pacific countries can do better in labor regulation and social protection

Truman Packard's picture

Those unfamiliar with the fast growing emerging economies of East Asia are likely to think that governments in these countries let market forces and capitalism roam free, red in tooth and claw. That was certainly my impression before coming to work in the region, and generally that held at the outset of our work by the group of us that wrote a new World Bank report “East Asia Pacific At Work: Employment, Enterprise and Wellbeing” .

The report shows just how wrong we were. We could be forgiven this impression—many of us had come from assignments in Latin America and the Caribbean or in Europe and Central Asia, where the distortions and rigidities from labor regulation and poorly designed social protection are rife, and where policy makers cast envious looks at the stellar and sustained employment outcomes in East Asia.

Well, it turns out that although they came relatively late to labor regulation and social protection, many governments in the region have entered this arena with gusto. We were surprised to find that, going just by what is written in their labor codes, the average level of employment protection in East Asia is actually higher than the OECD average.

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