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Philippines

Philippines: Shattering the Myths: It’s Not Tough to Build Green

Maria Teresita Lacerna's picture
Solar panels on the Tiarra houses in an affordable housing community in Batagas, south of Metro Manila, are expected to contribute to 32 percent savings in energy.

Buildings now dot the skyline of Bonifacio Global City in Metro Manila, which hosts, among others, the offices of the World Bank and the International Finance Corporation.  Who would have thought that this former military camp could be transformed into a bustling economic center in less than ten years?  And, with the rise of commercial buildings and residential condominiums following the area’s fast-paced growth, we see a growing demand for electricity that causes stress on the environment and resources. 

跟踪监测城市化:大数据如何推动制定相关政策确,确保城市增长造福贫困人口

Axel van Trotsenburg's picture
Also available in: English
 Measuring a Decade of Spatial Growth

每一分钟,东亚地区都有数十人从农村迁往城市。

随着人口大规模迁移,世界上形成了一些超大城市,如东京、上海、雅加达、首尔、马尼拉等,也形成了若干中小城市。

使用清洁饮水到乘坐每天上下班高峰时段在各城市间运送数以百万计人口的高铁,这一转变对人们生活和生计的方方面面产生了影响。

人们之所以迁往城市,是为了寻找更好的工作,改善生活状况。不过,城市化也伴随着风险,这些风险有可能延长贫困期,导致机会缺乏,不能改善未来发展前景。

城市一旦建成,城市形态和土地利用模式就锁定下来,后代难以更改。现在城市化相关工作,可避免今后花几十年时间和大量资金来修正错误。

Philippines: Traffic woes and the road ahead

louielimkin's picture
Traffic congestion results in an estimated productivity loss of around PHP2.4 billion ($54 million) a day or more than PHP800 billion ($18 billion) a year.



From my house in northern Quezon City, I drive more than two hours every day to get to the office in Bonifacio Global City, which is about three cities away where I come from, and two cities away from the capital Manila. It’s a journey that should only take around half an hour under light traffic. That is a total of four hours on the road a day, if there is no road accident or bad weather. It takes me an hour longer whenever I use the public transport system. Along with hundreds of thousands of Metro Rail Transit (MRT) commuters, I have to contend with extremely long lines, slow trains, and frequent delays due to malfunctions. This has been my experience for several years. Many of us might be wondering: why have these problems persisted?

Philippines: Owning a Toilet is a Sign of Progress

Karl Galing's picture

In the quiet village of Bantayanon in Negros Occidental, Ligaya Almunacid showed off her new toilet.  “This is my dream toilet,” she told us. Hers is not the typical structure made of palm-thatched roof and walls commonly seen in the area, but rather made of concrete hollow blocks with galvanized iron roofing. 
 
The 48-year old lady was all smiles throughout our conversation, telling us what she liked about the toilet. “I wanted my toilet to be durable especially since our house sits in the middle of a flood-prone area.” Ligaya recalled how difficult it was in the past when her family had to share their neighbor’s toilet, or take the risk of getting bitten by snakes in the field just to relieve themselves.  On closer examination, it would seem that she made the right decision in building a hygienic and resilient structure in securing her family’s health and welfare.

Philippines: One Year after Typhoon Haiyan: Social Protection Reduces Vulnerabilities to Disaster and Climate Risks

Mohamad Al-Arief's picture
  • Countries can respond to natural disasters better and assist victims faster if  social protection systems are in place
  • Social protection systems have a role  in addressing the human side of disaster and climate risks.
  • Global collaboration on mitigating disaster and climate risk through social protection systems  facilitates solutions
Social protection specialists, disaster risk managers, risk finance practitioners and climate change experts at the World Bank Group sat down together recently to discuss the role of social protection systems in addressing the human side of disaster and climate risks.
 
Together with government counterparts and donor partners, they extracted lessons and came out with a compelling message: countries can respond to natural disasters better and assist victims faster if robust social protection systems are in place.

Of Seasons and Typhoons

Leonardo B. Paat Jr's picture
Communities living along the coast in Cebu province are at highly at risk to the impacts of climate change.

Having grown up in Cagayan, a province in the northeastern most part of the Philippines, our lives have always been defined by the wet and dry season as well as typhoons. My childhood memories are dotted with events when our village would be flooded or hit by typhoons. There were times when we had to evacuate and once permanently relocate following a catastrophic flooding of the province due to the swelling of the Cagayan River. My grandfather, then a tobacco farmer, would despair as his crops were frequently wiped out due to either flooding or drought. I recall that he once said that perhaps the seasons were also going senile (the popular saying in Filipino is “ulyaning panahon) as they cannot seem to remember when they are supposed to occur.

Nothing left to waste in the Philippines

Maya Villaluz's picture


The waste sector spans from collection, sorting, separation, recycling, handling of residuals and safe, final disposal. The elements of an efficient and effective waste management system are multifaceted and its operations are complex. While many perceive the entire process as a ‘dirty’ business, it requires a high level of professionalism and sophistication to run a well-organized waste management scheme. It is not a surprise that a strong informal sector has evolved to cater to the unmet waste disposal needs of communities, industries and other waste generators.

It is estimated that over a hundred thousand people in the Philippines work in the informal waste sector. Many of these belong to vulnerable, marginalized groups - waste pickers in open dumpsites and other dumping grounds and wandering trash collectors, haulers and buyers on-foot or using wooden carts and bicycles.

Philippines: Why We Need to Invest in the Poor

Karl Kendrick Chua's picture
A fish vendor waits for customers in his stall in Cebu City. According to the latest Philippine Economic Update, pushing key reforms to secure access to land, promote competition and simplify business regulations will also help create more and better jobs and lift people out of poverty. ​(Photo by World Bank)



In my 10 years of working in the World Bank, I have seen remarkable changes around me. In 2004, Emerald Avenue in Ortigas Center, where the old World Bank office was located, started to wind down after 9 PM.  Finding a place to buy a midnight snack whenever I did overtime was hard. It was also hard to find a taxi after work.

Today, even at 3 AM, the street is bustling with 24-hour restaurants, coffee shops, and convenience stores, hundreds of BPO (Business Process Outsourcing) employees taking their break, and a line of taxis waiting to bring these new middle class earners home. Living in Ortigas Center today means that I also benefit from these changes.

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