Syndicate content

Thailand

How to scale up financial inclusion in ASEAN countries

José de Luna-Martínez's picture
MYR busy market

Globally, around 2 billion people do not use formal financial services. In Southeast Asia, there are 264 million adults who are still “unbanked”; many of them save their money under the mattress and borrow from so-called “loan sharks”, paying exorbitant interest rates on a daily or weekly basis. Recognizing the importance of financial inclusion for economic development, the leaders of the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) have made this one of their top priorities for the next five years.
 
Last week, the World Bank Group presented the latest data on financial inclusion in ASEAN to senior representatives of the ministries of finance and central banks of all 10 ASEAN member countries (Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam). The session, held in Kuala Lumpur, is one of the joint activities the new World Bank Research and Knowledge Hub and Malaysia is undertaking to support financial inclusion around the world.
 

สังคมสูงวัยในประเทศไทย – ใช้ชีวิตอย่างไรให้มั่งคั่งและยั่งยืน

Ulrich Zachau's picture
Also available in: English

ประเทศในอาเซียนกำลังก้าวเข้าสู่สังคมสูงวัย โดยเฉพาะประเทศไทยซึ่งมีจำนวนผู้สูงอายุเพิ่มขึ้นอย่างรวดเร็ว ในขณะนี้มีประชากรไทยที่มีอายุ 65 ปีหรือแก่กว่ามีจำนวนมากถึงร้อยละ 10 หรือมากกว่า 7 ล้านคน และภายในปี 2583 ประชากรในกลุ่มนี้จะเพิ่มจำนวนขึ้นถึง 17 ล้านคน ซึ่งมากกว่า 1 ใน 4 ของประชากรทั้งประเทศ ทั้งนี้ประเทศไทยยังมีส่วนแบ่งของจำนวนผู้สูงอายุมากที่สุดในกลุ่มประเทศที่กำลังพัฒนาในภูมิภาคเอเชียตะวันออกและแปซิฟิกเช่นเดียวกับประเทศจีน และจะกลายเป็นประเทศที่มีส่วนแบ่งของจำนวนผู้สูงอายุมากที่สุดในภูมิภาคภายในปี 2583 รายงานล่าสุดจากธนาคารโลก ‘Live Long and Prosper: Aging in East Asia and Pacific’ พูดถึงการก้าวเข้าสู่สังคมสูงวัยในภูมิภาคเอเชียตะวันออกและแปซิฟิก และได้นำเสนอวิธีการต่างๆ ที่แต่ละประเทศสามารถนำไปใช้แก้ปัญหา พร้อมชี้ให้เห็นถึงโอกาสที่เป็นประโยชน์ที่จะมาพร้อมกับปรากฎการณ์นี้

Aging in Thailand – How to live long and prosper

Ulrich Zachau's picture
Also available in: ภาษาไทย

Asian societies are aging, and Thailand is aging rapidly. Already over 10 percent of the Thai population, or more than 7 million people, are 65 years old or older. By 2040, a projected 17 million Thais above 65 years of age will account for more than a quarter of the population. Together with China, Thailand already has the highest share of elderly people of any developing country in East Asia and Pacific, and it is expected to have the highest elderly share by 2040. A recent World Bank report, Live Long and Prosper: Aging in East Asia and Pacific (pdf), discusses aging in Asia and how countries can address the resulting challenges, and take advantage of emerging opportunities.

In many ways, aging is a consequence of longer life expectancy due to development success in Thailand:  people live longer, and fertility has come down rapidly from the unsustainably high levels of earlier decades. However, every success brings new challenges and aging is no exception. For example, the size of the working age population in Thailand is expected to shrink over 10 percent by 2040. Thailand has exhausted its “demographic dividend”, and future growth and improvement in living standards will largely come from increases in productivity. In addition, households headed by elderly Thais are twice as likely to be poor as those in their 30s and 40s, and in most cases are not covered by formal sector pension schemes.

วิธีเพิ่มอัตราการเข้ารับการตรวจหรือการรักษาเชื้อเอชไอวีในกลุ่มผู้ที่มีความเสี่ยงสูงในกรุงเทพฯ

Sutayut Osornprasop's picture
Also available in: English
 
A caretaker at an HIV testing facility in Bangkok, Thailand.
ผู้ดูแลศูนย์ตรวจเชื้อเอชไอวีในกรุงเทพฯ ประเทศไทย


ประเทศไทยยังคงเป็นหนึ่งในกลุ่มประเทศที่ได้รับผลกระทบจากการระบาดของเชื้อเอชไอวีมากที่สุดในทวีปเอเชีย ในปัจจุบันประชากรจำนวน 440,000 คนในประเทศติดเชื้อเอชไอวี และจำนวนผู้เสียชีวิตจากโรคฉวยโอกาสมีประมาณ 1,250 คน ต่อปี
 
แม้ว่าประเทศไทยเองจะได้รับการยกย่องในความพยายามที่จะควบคุมการแพร่ระบาดของเชื้อเอชไอวีในหมู่ผู้ขายและผู้ใช้บริการทางเพศ โดยเฉพาะอย่างยิ่งจากโครงการ 100% Condom Use แต่การตอบสนองต่อเรื่องนี้จากกลุ่มชายที่มีเพศสัมพันธ์กับชาย ยังคงจำกัดอยู่ในวงแคบ 

Five facts about rice and poverty in the Greater Mekong Sub-region

Sergiy Zorya's picture

The Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS) is a major global rice producer and exporter but its population suffers from serious levels of poverty and malnutrition.
 
Spanning six countries – China, Myanmar, Lao PDR, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam – the region is home to 334 million people. Nearly 60 million of them are involved in rice production, growing collectively over 44% of the world’s rice. All of the countries, except China, are net exporters of rice. This means they have more rice available than required for domestic consumption. Yet, nearly 15% of the population is seriously malnourished and about 40% of children under five are stunted, in other words, too short for their age as a result of under nutrition.
 

我们必须时刻准备再次迎来严重厄尔尼诺现象

Axel van Trotsenburg's picture
Also available in: English
厄尔尼诺现象又回来了,而且可能会来的更猛。
 
干旱季节印尼东爪哇省Madiun的Dawuhan大坝干裂的河床上搁浅的木船。  2015年10月28日 © ANTARA FOTO/路透社/Corbis


今年上半年太平洋水域开始出现新一轮周期性变暖,亚洲、非洲和拉丁美洲都已感受到其影响。首次观察到太平洋海水变暖是在数百年前,自1950年以来正式开始监测跟踪。

气象专家预测此次厄尔尼诺现象将会持续到2016年春并有可能造成大破坏,因为气候变化可能导致一些地区暴雨和洪水加剧,另一些地区出现严重干旱和缺水。

厄尔尼诺的影响是全球性的,预计南美地区会遭遇暴雨和大洪水,非洲地区会经受酷热和干旱。

How to increase HIV testing and treatment in Bangkok for high-risk groups

Sutayut Osornprasop's picture
Also available in: ภาษาไทย
 
A caretaker at an HIV testing facility in Bangkok, Thailand.
A caretaker at an HIV testing facility in Bangkok, Thailand.


In Asia, Thailand remains one of the countries hardest hit by the HIV epidemic. Currently, 440,000 people are living with HIV and approximately 1,250 people die each year from HIV-related causes.

Although the country is often praised for its highly successful efforts to curb the spread of HIV among sex workers and their clients, particularly through the world-renowned 100% Condom Use Program, its response to HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) has been limited.
 

We must prepare now for another major El Niño

Axel van Trotsenburg's picture
Also available in: 中文
El Niño is back and may be stronger than ever.
 
A wooden boat is seen stranded on the dry cracked riverbed of the Dawuhan Dam during drought season in Madiun, Indonesia's East Java province.  October 28, 2015 © ANTARA FOTO/Reuters/Corbis



The latest cyclical warming of Pacific Ocean waters, first observed centuries ago and formally tracked since 1950, began earlier this year and already has been felt across Asia, Africa and Latin America.

Weather experts predict this El Niño will continue into the spring of 2016 and could wreak havoc, because climate change is likely to exacerbate the intensity of storms and flooding in some places and of severe drought and water shortages in others.

El Niño’s impacts are global, with heavy rain and severe flooding expected in South America and scorching weather and drought conditions likely in the Horn of Africa region.

เพศสถานะในโรงเรียนไทย: เราเติบโตมาในแบบที่เราได้รับการสั่งสอนในโรงเรียนหรือไม่?

Pamornrat Tansanguanwong's picture
Also available in: English
ขณะที่ฉันรอสัมภาษณ์คุณครูท่านหนึ่งที่โรงเรียนในพื้นที่ห่างไกลในประเทศไทย ภาพโรงอาหารในช่วงพักกลางวันทำให้ฉันหวนนึกถึงวันเวลาในวัยเด็ก ระหว่างนั้นฉันมีโอกาสพูดคุยและถามเด็กนักเรียนสองสามคนไปพลางๆ ว่าโตขึ้นพวกเขาอยากเป็นอะไร เด็กผู้ชายคนหนึ่งตอบว่า “ผมอยากเป็นหมอครับ” และเด็กผู้หญิงอีกคนตอบว่า “หนูอยากเป็นพยาบาลค่ะ” คำตอบของเด็กๆ ชวนให้ฉันคิดว่าค่านิยมทางเพศนั้นมีบทบาทขึ้นในชีวิต เมื่อตอนที่เราอายุยังน้อยขนาดนี้เลยหรือ
 
ครอบครัวและโรงเรียนเป็นสถาบันหลักของเด็กๆ ในการเรียนรู้เกี่ยวกับบรรทัดฐานต่างๆ ของสังคม โดยเฉพาะอย่างยิ่งในโรงเรียน ซึ่งเป็นสถานที่ๆ เด็กๆ จะได้เรียนรู้วิธีการเข้าสังคม ค่านิยมต่างๆ และความสัมพันธ์ระหว่างบุคคล ซึ่งรวมถึงเรื่องเพศสถานะด้วย
 
ในความเชื่อของหลายคน โรงเรียนนั้นมีอิทธิพลอย่างสูงในการสร้างค่านิยมเรื่องเพศ และที่ผ่านมานั้นงานวิจัยเชิงประจักษ์ในประเทศไทยยังมีไม่มากพอที่จะสร้างความเข้าใจที่ดีเกี่ยวกับประเด็นนี้
 
ในปีที่ผ่านมาคณะกรรมการส่งเสริมและประสานงานกิจการสตรี (PCWA) ได้ดำเนินโครงการศึกษา 2 โครงการ ซึ่งได้รับการสนับสนุนจากมูลนิธิร็อคกี้เฟลเลอร์ และธนาคารโลก เพื่อสร้างงานวิจัยเชิงประจักษ์ในเรื่องของเพศสถานะในระบบการศึกษาไทย โดยมีจุดมุ่งหมายในสนันสนุนหรือกำจัดสมมติฐานต่างๆ เกี่ยวกับเรื่องกรอบความคิดและอคติทางเพศว่ามีการการเรียนรู้ การสอน การแบ่งปัน หรือ การถ่ายทอดอย่างไรในประเทศไทย 
 

Gender in Thai schools: Do we grow up to be what we are taught?

Pamornrat Tansanguanwong's picture
Also available in: ภาษาไทย

Also available in: Français | العربية

While waiting to interview a teacher at one remote school in Thailand, the lunch scene reminded me of my childhood years in school.  I spoke to the young boys and girls asking them what they wanted to be when they grow up. “I want to be a doctor,” one boy said and “I want to be a nurse when I grow up” said another girl. Their answers left me wondering how young we were when our gender values formed.
 
Families and schools are the key institutions where young children learn social norms.   

Schools, in particular, provide the playground for children to socialize and work out their social values and relationships, including gender.
 
The impact of schools in forming gender values is believed to be high, but in the past there has been little evidence-based research in Thailand to generate understanding on this issue.
 
Last year, the Promoting and Coordinating Women’s Affairs Committee (PCWA) conducted two studies, supported by the Rockefeller Foundation and the World Bank, to provide evidence-based research on the gender situation in the Thai education system. It aims to help strengthen or dispel assumptions about how gender biases and stereotypes are learned, taught, shared and transmitted in Thailand.
 

Pages