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East Asia and Pacific

Pacific connected: A regional approach to development challenges facing island nations

Axel van Trotsenburg's picture



Dots on the world map – they are coral atolls and volcanic islands spread across a vast swath of the Pacific Ocean with names as exotic as their turquoise water, white sand and tropical foliage.
Twelve Pacific Island countries are members of the World Bank. Between them they are home to about 11 million people, much less than one percent of the global population.

One of them, Kiribati, consists of 33 atolls and coral islets, spread across an area larger than India, but with a land mass smaller than New Delhi. With less than 10,000 inhabitants, Tuvalu is the World Bank’s smallest member country.
Despite such remote and tiny landscapes, the Pacific Island countries – including Fiji, Palau, Samoa, Tonga, Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Marshall Islands, Papua New Guinea, the Federated States of Micronesia and Timor-Leste – represent far more than meets the eye.

Revisi PDB Indonesia: Potret yang Lebih Tepat

Alex Sienaert's picture
Also available in: English



Badan Pusat Statistik telah mengeluarkan statistik triwulan nasional pada 5 Februari 2015. Biasanya data yang diterbitkan secara triwulanan akan mengundang keingintahuan yang besar (setidaknya bagi para ekonom makro dan pengamat ekonomi yang selalu haus akan perkembangan data terbaru tren pertumbuhan jangka pendek). Namun data yang dihasilkan BPS kali ini mempunyai kekhususan karena selain memberikan data triwulan  tahun 2014, juga terdapat dua revisi signifikan terhadap statistik PDB Indonesia yaitu: (1) menggeser tahun dasar perhitungan PDB dari tahun 2000 menjadi 2010, dan (2) mengadopsi metodologi dan presentasi statisik yang jauh lebih baru (yaitu memperbaharui perhitungan neraca nasional dari Sistem SNA 1993 menjadi SNA 2008).[1]

Dengan adanya revisi ini, hal baru apa yang bisa diketahui tentang perkembangan ekonomi Indonesia yang tidak kita ketahui sebelumnya? Satu perubahan yang langsung terlihat adalah: output total dengan harga nominal saat ini menjadi sekitar 4,4 persen lebih besar dibanding estimasi pada tahun 2014 (dan rata-rata 5,2 persen lebih besar pada periode 2010-2014). Hal ini merupakan perubahan yang signifikan menambah Rp 448 triliun, atau sekitar USD 35,3 milyar pada besaran estimasi ekonomi Indonesia pada tahun 2014. Menurut BPS, sekitar sepertiga output tambahan tersebut adalah hasil penyertaan beberapa aktivitas ekonomi baru di bawah SNA 2008, dan sekitar dua-pertiga berasal dari perbaikan pengukuran.

Indonesia’s GDP revision: a crisper snapshot

Alex Sienaert's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia



Indonesia’s national statistics agency (Badan Pusat Statistik, BPS) released quarterly national accounts statistics on February 5. Any quarterly data release creates a flurry of interest (well, at least amongst macroeconomists and economy-watchers hungry for the latest update on near-term growth trends). But this is a particularly important release because, as well as providing data for the final quarter of 2014, it also incorporates two significant revisions to Indonesia’s GDP statistics: (1) it  shifts the basis of the computation from the year 2000 to 2010, and (2) it adopts a significantly updated methodology and presentation of the statistics (updating Indonesia’s national accounts from the 1993 System of National Accounts [SNA] to SNA 2008).[1]

What do these revisions tell us about Indonesia’s economy that we didn’t know before? One change immediately stands out: total output in current prices is about 4.4 percent larger than previously estimated in 2014 (and 5.2 percent larger on average over 2010-2014). This is a significant change, adding IDR 448 trillion, or about USD 35.5 billion at the current market exchange rate, to the estimated size of the economy as of 2014. Roughly a third of the extra measured output is due to the incorporation of new kinds of economic activity under SNA 2008, and about two-thirds comes from more accurate measurements of previously-measured kinds of output, according to BPS.  

How to narrow the gap between the rich and poor in Malaysia?

Frederico Gil Sander's picture

If you could make one New Year’s wish for your country, what would it be?

For many Malaysians, Prime Minister Najib Razak’s wish for “a safer, more prosperous, and more equal society” likely resonated with their hopes for 2015.

Malaysians appear to be increasingly concerned about income inequality. According to a 2014 Pew Global survey, 77% of Malaysians think that the gap between the rich and poor is a big problem. The government has acknowledged that inequality remains high, and that tackling these disparities will be Malaysia’s “biggest challenge” in becoming a high-income nation.

How can Malaysia narrow the gap between the rich and poor? Global experience suggests two possible levers to achieve a more equitable income distribution.

Philippines: Shattering the Myths: It’s Not Tough to Build Green

Maria Teresita Lacerna's picture
Solar panels on the Tiarra houses in an affordable housing community in Batagas, south of Metro Manila, are expected to contribute to 32 percent savings in energy.

Buildings now dot the skyline of Bonifacio Global City in Metro Manila, which hosts, among others, the offices of the World Bank and the International Finance Corporation.  Who would have thought that this former military camp could be transformed into a bustling economic center in less than ten years?  And, with the rise of commercial buildings and residential condominiums following the area’s fast-paced growth, we see a growing demand for electricity that causes stress on the environment and resources. 

跟踪监测城市化:大数据如何推动制定相关政策确,确保城市增长造福贫困人口

Axel van Trotsenburg's picture
Also available in: English
 Measuring a Decade of Spatial Growth

每一分钟,东亚地区都有数十人从农村迁往城市。

随着人口大规模迁移,世界上形成了一些超大城市,如东京、上海、雅加达、首尔、马尼拉等,也形成了若干中小城市。

使用清洁饮水到乘坐每天上下班高峰时段在各城市间运送数以百万计人口的高铁,这一转变对人们生活和生计的方方面面产生了影响。

人们之所以迁往城市,是为了寻找更好的工作,改善生活状况。不过,城市化也伴随着风险,这些风险有可能延长贫困期,导致机会缺乏,不能改善未来发展前景。

城市一旦建成,城市形态和土地利用模式就锁定下来,后代难以更改。现在城市化相关工作,可避免今后花几十年时间和大量资金来修正错误。

Philippines: Traffic woes and the road ahead

louielimkin's picture
Traffic congestion results in an estimated productivity loss of around PHP2.4 billion ($54 million) a day or more than PHP800 billion ($18 billion) a year.



From my house in northern Quezon City, I drive more than two hours every day to get to the office in Bonifacio Global City, which is about three cities away where I come from, and two cities away from the capital Manila. It’s a journey that should only take around half an hour under light traffic. That is a total of four hours on the road a day, if there is no road accident or bad weather. It takes me an hour longer whenever I use the public transport system. Along with hundreds of thousands of Metro Rail Transit (MRT) commuters, I have to contend with extremely long lines, slow trains, and frequent delays due to malfunctions. This has been my experience for several years. Many of us might be wondering: why have these problems persisted?

Businesses benefit where governments are unable or unwilling to protect human rights, right? Wrong

Carolyn Blacklock's picture



When one thinks of businesses operating in countries that are still struggling to protect and provide for human rights, a narrative can easily spring to mind involving unscrupulous businesses happily taking advantage of weak labor laws, a lack of minimum wage and poor environmental controls. But, in many places, the reality is very different. Not only is the private sector itself adversely impacted by weak human rights protections but, more than this, businesses are themselves having to take up a leadership role to compensate for weaknesses that exist at a national level.

Tiga pelajaran penting dari Tsunami 2004

Abhas Jha's picture
Also available in: English



Pada dasarnya saya adalah orang yang pragmatis, mengingat awal karir saya sebagai petugas kelurahan, lanjut terus ke kecamatan, di India, ketika saya bertanggungjawab untuk banyak hal yang terjadi di lapangan, mulai dari persediaan air hingga rencana penggunaan lahan pertanian. Namun saya sangat sedih dan terpukul menyaksikan dampak dari bencana tsunami 2004. Di Indonesia saja, sekitar 220.000 orang kehilangan nyawa.

Three key lessons from the 2004 Tsunami

Abhas Jha's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia



I began my professional career as a sub-district and district level administrator in India-a position that makes one responsible for pretty much everything- from making sure the water comes out of the taps and the garbage is collected in the morning to helping pull accident victims out from horrific accidents and facing down stone-pelting mobs. This early experience of being thrown into the deep end of the pool gives me a somewhat pragmatic sense of perspective and equanimity. But I still recall the horror and overwhelming grief that I felt when the full impact of the 2004 Tsunami started becoming clear. In Indonesia alone approximately 220,000 people lost their lives.

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