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New global poverty estimates confirm China’s leading role in meeting MDGs

David Dollar's picture

The international community has endorsed the Millenium Development Goal of reducing the poverty rate in the developing world by 50% over the 25 years, 1990-2015.  While the target is arbitrary, it is nonetheless important to have a stretch goal like this to challenge us all to make the world a better place.  To measure progress, naturally we need pretty good estimates of global poverty.  The World Bank is the leading bean counter in this exercise.  It just today released new estimates of global poverty that have the potential to illuminate the progress, but also the potential to confuse a lot of people.  The research department of the World Bank has changed its global poverty line from $1 per day to $1.25 per day and has found about 468 million more poor people than it had previously estimated.  About 135 million of these newly found poor are in China.  How does one make sense of these new numbers?  Here are some pointers:

NASA's Climate Time Machine shows changes in key indicators

Claudia Gabarain's picture

G8 countries are discussing climate change this week, and I just came across a cool site from NASA and the California Institute of Technology: a very simple, visual "Climate Time Machine" website that shows changes in so

New World Trade Indicators database compares results in 210 countries and customs territories

Claudia Gabarain's picture

The World Bank released a couple of days ago a new interactive database on trade, the World Trade Indicators. It allows benchmarking and comparison among 210 countries and customs territories, and it includes multiple trade-related indicators.

New Bank report confirms East Asia remains robust amid global slowdown

Claudia Gabarain's picture

In 2008, growth in China, the rest of East Asia and the Pacific, and other developing regions together will fall from 7.8 percent to a still-strong 6.5 percent while their high-income trading partners like the United States slow to between 1 and 2 percent and import less.

Lessons from China for Africa - my take

David Dollar's picture

Thirty African officials visited China for 12 days in May on a pilot South-South knowledge exchange organized by the Chinese government with assistance from the World Bank.  My colleague, Phil Karp, has written about the program, including the study tour around China that he accompa

Picture the figures of the food crisis

Claudia Gabarain's picture

Using data from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the OECD, BBC News online created some interesting graphics showing the impact of and factors in the current food crisis. They include a 30-year look at food commodity prices, US ethanol production, world population growth, changing eating habits, and demand for biofuels among others. Worth a look.

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