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Trả lời thêm câu hỏi về thành phố phát triển nhanh chóng

Dean Cira's picture

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Dean Cira

 (Chuyên gia về đô thị Dean Cira trong một video mới đây đã trả lời 5 câu hỏi về các thành phố phát triển nhanh chóng do độc giả gửi về qua mạng internet. Trong bài viết này, ông Dean sẽ trả lời thêm một số câu hỏi nữa.)

Mạnh Hà từ Việt Nam hỏi: Đô thị hóa hiện nay tập trung quá nhiều vào xây dựng mới, làm tăng mật độ dân số và xây dựng và làm môi trường sống của người dân bị thu hẹp lại. Theo ông thì đâu là mô hình quy hoạch mà Việt Nam nên sử dụng?

 

 Có một niềm tin phổ biến trong các nhà quy hoạch và người Việt Nam nói chung là cần giảm tải mật độ của các trung tâm đô thị lớn ở Hà Nội và thành phố Hồ Chí Minh để cải thiện chất lượng cuộc sống. Nhưng thực sự là, nếu xét theo tiêu chuẩn Châu Á thì mật độ của Hà Nội không phải là quá dày đặc. 

Jobs and skills: more answers to your questions

Lars Sondergaard's picture

(Last week, I posted: “Wanted: Jobs and your questions about how to find them” on this blog. We received dozens of questions back through social media. Lars Sondergaard, a World Bank expert on education, answered some of them in a video and now he gets to a few more here. He throws out some questions of his own and would love to hear back from you. — Anne Elicaño)

Anonymous asked through the blog: I was wondering about job outlook for chemical and mechanical engineers in the future”

If you are just about to graduate as an engineer and worry whether you will be able to find a job, I have some good news: in most countries, too few students study engineering relative to the jobs available with the results that engineering graduates tend to have an easier time finding employment than their peers. A lot is written about this vibrant demand, check out this article in Forbes about the demand for engineers  (or the World Bank’s “Putting Higher Education to Work: Skills and Research for Growth”)

Four years on: What China got right when rebuilding after the Sichuan earthquake

Vivian Argueta Bernal's picture
The devastation from the Sichuan earthquake was immense; the recovery, impressive.

Four years ago on May 12, 2008, the world was stunned by the news of an 8-magnitude massive earthquake that struck Wenchuan of Sichuan Province and affected, in total, ten provinces in Southwestern C

Live web chat - How can cities prepare for and manage floods?

Claudia Gabarain's picture

Copyright Gideon MendelFloods are the most frequent among all natural disasters. In 2010 alone, 178 million people globally were affected by floods. More than 90 % of the global population exposed to floods lives in Asia.

 

Монгол: 20 хувийн өсөлт бүхий эдийн засгийн эрсдэл нь юу вэ?

Rogier van den Brink's picture

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 Мөнхийн хөх тэнгэртэй Монгол орноос чимэгтэй сайхан мэдээнүүд сонсогдож эхэллээ.  Энэ оны гуравдугаар улиралд эдийн засаг 20.8 хувь өсч, хоёрдугаар улиралын 17.3 хувийн өсөлтийг ч гүйцсэн нь урьд өмнө байгаагүй эдийн засгийн тэсрэлтийг бий болголоо ( өмнөх жилийн мөн үетэй харьцуулсан өсөлт). Энэ өсөлт нь уул уурхайн салбар, ялангуяа 2012 онд үйлдвэрлэлт нь эхлэх алт зэсний дэлхийн хэмжээний орд болох Оюу толгойгоос үүдэлтэй ч бусад олон жижиг уул уурхайнууд бүрэн хүчин чадлаараа ажиллаж байгаа учир хамрах хүрээ нь өргөн байна. Үйлдвэрлэлийн салбар ч сайн байна.

Mongolia: what are the risks for an economy that's growing at 20 percent?

Rogier van den Brink's picture

Available in: монгол хэл

There is good news coming out of Mongolia, the land of the eternal blue skies. The economy racked up a second quarter of high growth: the third quarter came in at 20.8 percent, topping the equally amazing second quarter of 17.3 percent (year-on-year GDP growth), as discussed in the World Bank's latest Mongolia Quarterly Update. And while this growth spurt originated in the mining sector, with Oyu Tolgoi—a mega copper and gold mine—getting ready to start producing in 2012 and a whole battery of other, smaller mines producing at full capacity, the high growth is quite broad-based. Even manufacturing is doing well.

Laos: How the Nam Theun 2 dam is managed during flood events

William Rex's picture

William RexIt’s been an unusually severe rainy season in some parts of Lao PDR, with several typhoons passing over after making landfall in Vietnam.  Thailand is also severely hit, with Bangkok bracing itself for floods as I write this

Why don't we see social accountability in the Pacific?

Nicholas Menzies's picture
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Transparent notification of fees on the main door of a rural church-run hospital in Western Province, Papua New Guinea.

From participatory budgeting in Porto Alegre, Brazil (pdf) to health clinic scorecards in Uganda social accountability mechanisms are a familiar feature of the development landscape across most regions of the world…so why not in the South-West Pacific?

One reason service delivery is poor in many Pacific states is that the same challenges that make it difficult to deliver services also make it difficult for officials to go out and account for them - dispersed populations; high transport costs; and a limited number of trained officials to supervise. This lack of oversight by government officials contributes to shoddy or non-existent services.

Can social accountability make up for some of the shortcomings in government accountability? Social accountability is the fostering of direct linkages between citizens and service providers. It can be thought of as working both prior to the delivery of a service (for example, residents meet with local government officials to set budgets so that spending aligns with community needs) as well as after a service has - or has not - been delivered (such as a complaints mechanism for residents to report police who fail to respond to calls for help).

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