Syndicate content


Vietnam: Breaking gender stereotypes that hinder women’s empowerment

Victoria Kwakwa's picture
Also available in: Tiếng Việt
Empowering Women with Job Opportunities

In August 2015, I traveled with colleagues to An Giang Province in southern Vietnam to visit beneficiaries of an innovative project that is helping 200 Cham ethnic minority women learn embroidery.  Selling their embroidery, they earn incomes for themselves. We were inspired by the positive change that the small amount of money invested in this project is bringing to the lives of these women and their families.
This project, with funding from the 2013 Vietnam Women’s Innovation Day, supported by the Vietnam Women’s Union, the World Bank, and other partners - private and public - has helped improved economic opportunities for Cham women.  All through the old traditional art of embroidery.    
“This training and job creation project has helped a group of women get a stable monthly income of more than two million Dong (about $100), without leaving their homes. This means they can still take care of their children and look after their homes,” Kim Chi, a local female entrepreneur and leader of the project, told us. “Women participating in the project not only learn embroidery skills, which preserve Cham traditions, but also provide opportunities to share experiences in raising children and living a healthy life style, and support each other when needed.”
While we were all excited about the successes under the project, a bit more reflection reminded me that unless cultural norms which require Cham women to mainly work from home, are addressed, it will be hard for projects like this, no matter how well designed, to have a lasting impact in helping Cham women realize their full economic and social potential. 

Does Women’s Leadership in Vietnam Matter?

Victoria Kwakwa's picture
Also available in: Tiếng Việt
High primary enrollment ratios for girls and impressive female labour force participation rates are two striking examples of Vietnam’s progress on gender equality. On female leadership, however, Vietnam has a huge unfinished agenda. The good news is that a recent study by Grant Thornton (2013) shows women’s leadership in business is growing and 30 percent of Board of Director roles in Vietnam are held by women compared to the global average of 19 percent. Women’s membership in the Communist Party has also risen from over 20 percent in 2005 to more than 30 percent in 2010.   The not so good news is that across business, government and political spheres, the face of leadership in Vietnam is still overwhelmingly male. 

In the last decade and a half, the share of women in the National Assembly has been declining. Only one out of nine chairs of National Assembly Committees is female. Women’s representation remains low in key bodies of the Communist Party: the Politburo (two out of 16), the Central Committee and the Secretariat.  In Government, the civil service has a large percentage of women but their representation in leadership is small and tends to be at lower levels: 11 percent at the division level, 5 percent at director level and only 3 percent at ministerial level (UNDP, 2012).

But should we be concerned about getting higher levels of women in leadership? Is this just about “political correctness” or can having more women in leadership in business, government and politics benefit Vietnam’s development?

Vai trò lãnh đạo của phụ nữ tại Việt Nam quan trọng như thế nào?

Victoria Kwakwa's picture
Also available in: English

Việt nam đã đạt được những tiến bộ rất đáng khích lệ trong bình đẳng giới như tỉ lệ đi học của trẻ em gái và tỉ lệ của lao động nữ trong lực lượng lao động rất cao. Cuối năm 2013 chúng ta có một tin vui là một nghiên cứu của Grant Thornton, cho thấy phụ nữ Việt nam ngày càng nắm nhiều vị trí lãnh đạo trong các doanh nghiệp. Tỉ lệ nữ trong hội đồng quản trị tại các doanh nghiệp Việt Nam là 30% trong khi tỉ lệ trung bình toàn cầu là 19%. Tỉ lệ đảng viên nữ trong Đảng Cộng sản Việt Nam cũng tăng từ 25% năm 2005 lên 30% năm 2010. Tuy vậy, đa số các vị trí lãnh đạo doanh nghiệp, chính quyền và đời sống chính trị vẫn là nam giới. Xét chung về vai trò của phụ nữ trên các cương vị lãnh đạo thì còn nhiều việc cần làm.  

Tỉ lệ nữ trong Quốc hội giảm dần trong thập niên vừa qua. Trong số 9 người đứng đầu các ủy ban của Quốc hội, chỉ có 1 là nữ. Số phụ nữ trong các cơ quan quan trọng nhất của Đảng như Bộ Chính chị, Ban chấp hành trung ương và Ban bí thư còn rất thấp (chỉ có 2 nữ trong số 16 ủy viên Bộ Chính trị). Về phía chính quyền, tuy tỉ lệ nữ công chức lớn, nhưng tỉ lệ lãnh đạo nữ lại khá thấp và ở cấp thấp: tỉ lệ lãnh đạo nữ cấp phòng là 11%, cấp sở là 5% và cấp bộ là 3% (UNDP, 2012).

Câu hỏi đặt ra là liệu chúng ta có nên coi vấn đề có thêm nhiều phụ nữ vào cương vị lãnh đạo là quan trọng không? Cần làm như vậy cho “phải phép” hay liệu việc nhiều phụ nữ tham gia lãnh đạo doanh nghiệp, chính quyền và đời sống chính trị thực sự mang lại lợi ích cho quá trình phát triển của đất nước?