Syndicate content

participation

Lồng ghép giới trong tái định cư: Chúng ta đã cố hết sức chưa?

Nghi Quy Nguyen's picture
Also available in: English
Một phụ nữ người Thái tại buổi lấy ý kiến về dự án thuỷ điện
Trung sơn.  Photo: Bồ Thị Hồng Mai / Ngân hàng Thế giới


Tháng 8 năm 2016, tôi đến Quảng Ngãi, một tỉnh miền Trung Việt Nam, nhằm thu thập số liệu điều tra về sự tham gia của phụ nữ trong quá trình tái định cư. Tôi nghĩ cuộc họp đầu tiên với người dân địa phương sẽ diễn ra suôn sẻ và nhanh chóng, nhưng thực tếkhông hẳn như vậy.

“Phụ nữ á? Chúng tôi tham gia á? Tham gia cũng thế thôi. Chúng tôi chỉ quanh quẩn ở nhà, nên không quan tâm đến việc cán bộ đến và hỏi chúng tôi tham gia hay không,” một phụ nữ nói. “Cái chúng tôi muốn biết là những kiến nghị hôm nay sẽ được thực hiện đến đâu. Chúng tôi cần một khu tái định cư, nhà văn hoá chung cho cộng đồng, cần có cây cối và nhà trẻ như đã hứa khi chuẩn bị dự án.”

Những ý kiến đó hé lộ một vấn đề quan trọng. Đó là sự lệch pha giữa cái mà ta tưởng là phụ nữ muốn và nhu cầu thực sự của họ.

Phụ nữ chịu tác động nghiêm trọng hơn nam giới trong quá trình tái định cư bởi họ phải đối đầu với nhiều khó khăn trong vấn đề ổn định gia đình. Điều này càng dễ thấy nếu không có cơ chế thu hút sự tham gia và lấy ý kiến phụ nữ một cách thực chất trong quá trình thực hiện dự án nói chung và trong quá trình tái định cư nói riêng.

Gender mainstreaming in resettlement processes: Have we done enough?

Nghi Quy Nguyen's picture
Also available in: Tiếng Việt
A Thai woman in a consultation meeting in Trung Son
Hydropower Project. Photo: Mai Bo / World Bank

Last August, I visited Quang Ngai, a central coastal province in Vietnam, to collect data for a survey on women’s participation in resettlement activities. I expected our first meeting with the local community to be short and uncontroversial. It wasn’t.

“We, women? Our participation? It doesn’t matter. We all stay at home. We don’t care about you coming here and asking about our participation,” said one female participant. “What we do care is to know the extent to which the recommendations we make today will be addressed. We need a resettlement site with community house, trees and kindergarten as promised during the project preparation.” 

That comment brought to light an important perspective, highlighting the tension between what we might expect women to want, and their actual needs.

The impacts of development-induced resettlement disproportionately affect women, as they are faced with more difficulties than men to cope with disruption to their families. And this is particularly the case if there is no mechanism to enable meaningful participation and consultation with women throughout the project cycle in general and in the resettlement process in particular.

Gender “mainstreaming” — not (actually) lost in translation

Patricia Fernandes's picture

Available in 中文

Changes were made in the way village meetings were run so women would participate more.

Whenever and wherever the Bank supports a project, to “mainstream” gender is one of the goals. The idea is a fairly simple one. Right? Making sure that men and women benefit equally from the poverty reduction activities we support. 

There are a number of tools we produce to help us achieve this—Gender Analysis, Regional Gender Action Plans, County Gender Action Plans, Gender Disaggregated Outcome Indicators, Gender Check-Lists, Strategies and Tool-Kits, etc. So looking at the amount of guidance we seem to need one might be forgiven for thinking this is an exceedingly complex task and for wondering whether in reality (i.e. after that board approval is done and the real work of implementation begins) all of the “gender mainstreaming language” doesn’t get a little lost in translation… 

Matching governance demand and supply

Naazneen Barma's picture

For over a decade, the World Bank has emphasized the centrality of good public sector governance and anticorruption efforts in achieving sustainable development impact in low- and middle-income countries.  But more recently the Bank has widened its analytic and operational lens on governance to include what is being called the “demand-side” of governance.  What does this mean, and what are the implications for Bank work in its client countri