Syndicate content

Climate Change

Are we there yet? – A journey towards sustainable flood risk management in Pacific Island countries

Simone Esler's picture
The Mataniko River floodplain at Koa Hill, Solomon Islands, after the April 2014 flood. Many houses were completely washed away and several lives were lost. (Photo: Alan McNeil, Solomon Islands government)

 

‘Are we there yet?’ On a long road trip, perhaps you’ve asked or heard this question.

Let’s direct this question to the state of urban flood risk management in Pacific Island countries.  In this case, the ‘destination’ is flood-resilient communities.

For Pacific Island countries, no, we’re not there yet, but are we heading in the right direction?

The New ASEAN Green Bonds Standards

Ashraf Arshad's picture
The ASEAN Green Bonds Standards are a big step forward towards more green investments in the region. Photo: bigstock/jamesteoh


Climate change poses a significant threat to the economic development of countries around the world. The World Bank estimates that up to a 100 million poor people could be pushed back into poverty by 2030 as a result of climate changein part due to a combination of higher agricultural prices and threats to food security and health – especially in the poorer parts of the world. The Paris Agreement and the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have provided commitments to tackle the most urgent of these environmental challenges.

Making a VR film in Fiji: Q&A with the team behind 'Our Home, Our People'

Tom Perry's picture

In November 2017 at the COP23 climate change conference in Bonn, Germany, the World Bank – in partnership with the Fijian Government – launched its biggest foray yet into the world of 360-degree Virtual Reality (VR).

Our Home, Our People is a storytelling project that takes viewers to the heart of climate change in Fiji.

Within six weeks of going live, film has been viewed by more than 3,500 people at the COP23 event, more than 200,000 people on YouTube, 170,000 people via VeerVR, and has garnered significant global interest.

Here, the team behind the film provides an insight into how the project came about, some of the challenges of making the film in VR, and what the project meant to those involved.


Working together to understand climate change risks in Fiji

Katherine Baker's picture



People read about climate change every day and we are all familiar with it as a concept.  While we understand that steps need to be taken to address the risks; its impact often feels harder to imagine. We assume that the impacts are something we will experience in the future. 

But in the Pacific, the impacts are already being felt by communities. This came across clearly in our work on the Climate Vulnerability Assessment – Making Fiji Climate Resilient report, which the Fijian Government produced with the support of our team and the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR), and which was launched at COP23.

A Greener Growth Path to Sustain Thailand’s Future

Ulrich Zachau's picture
Also available in: ภาษาไทย

Global experience shows that growing first and cleaning up later rarely works. Rather, it is in countries’ interest to prioritize green and clean growth. This also holds true for Thailand, a country with rich natural resources contributing significantly to its wealth.

According to World Bank data, annual natural resource depletion in Thailand accounted for 4.4 percent of Gross National Income in 2012, and it has been rising rapidly since 2002. The rate of depletion is comparable to other countries in the East Asia and Pacific region, but it is almost three times faster than the rate in the 1980s. 

Rapid natural resource depletion in Thailand is increasingly visible in reduced forest areas. Illegal logging and smuggling have led to a decline from 171 million rai of forested area in 1961 to 107.6 million rai in 2009. Coastal communities face erosion, ocean waste, and illegal, destructive fishing. The coasts are also increasingly vulnerable to storm surges and sea level rise, due to continued destruction of mangroves and coral reefs.

เส้นทางการเติบโตสีเขียวเพื่ออนาคตที่ยั่งยืนของประเทศไทย

Ulrich Zachau's picture
Also available in: English

ประสบการณ์จากประเทศทั่วโลก แสดงให้เห็นว่าการให้ความสำคัญ กับการเติบโตทางเศรษฐกิจก่อน แล้วค่อยแก้ไขเรื่องสิ่งแวดล้อมภายหลังนั้นอาจไม่สำเร็จ เมื่อเทียบกับประเทศที่ใส่ใจและให้ความสำคัญ กับเรื่องการเติบโตที่สะอาดและเป็นมิตรกับสิ่งแวดล้อม เช่นเดียวกับประเทศไทยซึ่งมีทรัพยากรธรรมชาติอุดมสมบูรณ์ ซึ่งเป็นฐานเศรษฐกิจและความมั่งคั่งของประเทศ 

จากข้อมูลของธนาคารโลกพบว่าเมื่อปี 2555 อัตราการลดลงของทรัพยากรธรรมชาติต่อปีของไทยนั้นอยู่ 4.4% จากรายได้ประชาชาติรวมของประเทศ และสูงกว่าปี 2545 อย่างมาก แม้ว่าอัตรานี้จะไม่แตกต่างจากประเทศอื่นๆ ในภูมิภาคเอเชียตะวันออกและแปซิฟิก แต่สำหรับประเทศไทยนั้นนับว่าเพิ่มขึ้นถึง 3 เท่าจากช่วงปี 2523-2533 

การสูญเสียพื้นที่ป่าเป็นตัวอย่างที่ทำให้เราเห็นการลดลงของทรัพยากรธรรมชาติไทยที่สูงขึ้นได้อย่างชัดเจน การตัดไม้เถื่อนและการลักลอบตัดไม้ส่งผลให้พื้นที่ป่าของไทยลดลงจาก 171 ล้านไร่ในปีพ.ศ. 2504 เหลือเพียง 107.6 ล้านไร่ในปี 2552 ชุมชนที่อาศัยอยู่ตามแนวชายฝั่งทะเลกำลังเผชิญกับภาวะกัดเซาะชายฝั่ง ขยะในทะเล และการลักลอบจับปลาแบบผิดกฎหมาย ชายฝั่งทะเลไทยเผชิญกับความเสี่ยงอันเกิดจากคลื่นพายุซัดชายฝั่งและน้ำทะเลสูงขึ้นอันเป็นผลจากการทำลายพื้นที่ป่าโกงกางและแนวปะการังอย่างต่อเนื่อง

Upgrading Apia’s main road, a path to climate-proofing Samoa’s future

Kara Mouyis's picture
Vaitele Street, Samoa
Vaitele Street is considered the most important section of road in Samoa and in 2016, through the Enhanced Road Access Project, it received a critical upgrade and extension.


Driving from the airport into the city of Apia, the capital of Samoa, is a great introduction to the country. Villages line the road with gardens filled with colorful flowers and palm trees. Hugging the northwest coastline, the road sometimes comes as close as five meters from the shoreline, giving passengers truly spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean.

While it’s a scenic introduction to Samoa, this drive is also a stark reminder of just how sensitive the country’s coastline is to erosion and damage. More than 50% of West Coast Road, Apia’s main roadway, sits less than three meters (9.8 feet) above sea level and just a few meters from the shoreline, making it highly vulnerable to damage and deterioration. When tropical cyclones, heavy rain, king tides and storm surges hit these coastal roads, they can lead to erosion, flooding and landslips, causing road closures and threatening the safety of the people who use them.

Mengelola kebakaran: Upaya Indonesia untuk mencegah krisis kebakaran hutan dan lahan

Ann Jeannette Glauber's picture
Also available in: English



Berita kebakaran hutan dan lahan bukan hal baru di Indonesia. Tapi drama penyenderaan di tengah “musim kebakaran”? Ini sesuatu yang baru, dan mendominasi deretan tajuk utama pemberitaan di awal September. Setelah mengumpulkan bukti lahan yang terbakar di area konsesi kebun sawit di Rokan Hulu, Riau, tujuh petugas Kementerian Lingkungan Hidup dan Kehutanan (KLHK) disandera dan dipaksa menyerahkan atau menghapus bukti yang mereka kumpulkan.

Controlling the burn: Indonesia’s efforts to prevent forest and land fire crisis

Ann Jeannette Glauber's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia



Forest and land fires making the news in Indonesia is nothing new. But a hostage drama in the middle of “fire season”? That’s a new twist, and indeed dominated headlines in early September. After collecting evidence of burned land within a palm oil concession in Rokan Hulu, Riau, seven inspectors from the Ministry of Environment and Forestry (MOEF) were taken captive and violently threatened to handover or delete the gathered evidence.

Pages