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A Catalyst for Green Financing in Indonesia

Philippe H. Le Houérou's picture



It is an unfortunate but fact of life that Indonesia often deals with the impacts of natural disasters. It was sadly evident again this week when I arrived in Jakarta to the unfolding disaster caused by the earthquake in Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara. My condolences go out to the families and friends of those who lost their lives.

While scientists are reluctant to say a specific natural disaster is caused by climate change, they say a changing climate is resulting in more extreme events around the world. That’s why at International Finance Corporation (IFC), the largest global organization working with the private sector in emerging markets, finding new avenues for climate financing is a key priority.

Green bonds offer a pathway. The world is witnessing a rapid growth in green bonds, dramatically increasing the flow of capital to green projects and bringing new financiers into the climate smart investment space.

Percontohan di Indonesia menarik minat wirausahawan untuk membawa teknologi memasak yang sehat dan hemat energi ke rumah tangga

Yabei zhang's picture
Also available in: English


Bapak Kris mengelola pabrik penghasil pelet yang terletak di dekat kota Boyolali, Jawa Tengah. Sejak pabrik dibentuk, ia telah berpikir untuk merambah pasar domestik — meskipun sampai saat ini pelet produksinya diutamakan untuk ekspor — dikarenakan mulai redanya antusiasme pasar global. Ketika Bapak Kris mendapat informasi bahwa Program Inisiatif Tungku Sehat Hemat Energi (TSHE) / Clean Stove Initiative (CSI) Indonesia telah meluncurkan program percontohan Pembiayaan Berbasis Hasil (PBH), ia pun ikut mendaftar dan berpartisipasi dalam program tersebut.

Ia menggabungkan wawasannya tentang pasar pelet lokal dengan insentif yang diberikan program percontohan untuk mengembangkan jaringan distribusi dan menguji TSHE berbasis pelet buatannya. Setiap tungku yang dijual dilengkapi 1 kilo pelet kayu yang perusahaannya berikan secara cuma-cuma. Dengan pengalamannya bergabung dalam program percontohan PBH, Pak Kris melihat adanya potensi pasar tungku masak yang bersih dan efisien. Ia berencana terus menjual TSHE dengan harapan suatu saat dapat mendirikan pabrik pelet miliknya sendiri. 

Indonesia pilot attracts entrepreneurs’ appetite to bring clean cooking technologies to households

Yabei zhang's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia



Bapak Kris manages a pellet production factory, located just outside Boyolali City in Central Java. Since its founding, he has started considering the domestic market- despite the fact that the produced pellets have mainly been for export- as the global markets have begun to cool down. When Bapak Kris learned that the Indonesia Clean Stove Initiative (CSI) had launched its Results-Based Financing (RBF) pilot in the Province, he registered and participated in the pilot. 

He combined his knowledge of the local pellet market with the pilot program incentives to expand his distribution network and test new pellet-based clean stoves. With each stove sold, the company provided the consumer 1 kg of wood pellets free of charge. With the experience of participating in the RBF pilot, Pak Kris sees the potential of the clean cooking market. He plans to continue selling clean stoves and hopes to set up his own pellet factory. 

The New ASEAN Green Bonds Standards

Ashraf Arshad's picture
The ASEAN Green Bonds Standards are a big step forward towards more green investments in the region. Photo: bigstock/jamesteoh


Climate change poses a significant threat to the economic development of countries around the world. The World Bank estimates that up to a 100 million poor people could be pushed back into poverty by 2030 as a result of climate changein part due to a combination of higher agricultural prices and threats to food security and health – especially in the poorer parts of the world. The Paris Agreement and the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have provided commitments to tackle the most urgent of these environmental challenges.

In China, a South-South Exchange Helps Countries Yearning for Clean and Efficient Heating Learn from Each Other

Yabei zhang's picture

Places with cold climates need access to a reliable and efficient heat supply for the health of their population. But in developing countries, the majority of rural and peri-urban households do not have access to centralized heating or gas networks. Instead, they use traditional heating stoves that use solid fuels like coal, wood, and dung for heating. These stoves are often inefficient (with thermal efficiency as low as 25%-40% compared to 70% or above for efficient stoves) and emit large amounts of pollutants (e.g., CO and PM2.5), causing indoor and outdoor air pollution with negative health and environmental impacts.
 

Cheers, NZ: How New Zealand and the World Bank are changing lives in the Pacific

Kara Mouyis's picture




New Zealand has a long history of supporting its close neighbors in the Pacific, both in times of disaster and emergencies, and to help improve the lives of many thousands across the region.

On Waitangi Day, the national day of New Zealand, we take a look at three key World Bank projects in the Pacific, and how New Zealand’s support has been integral to making them happen.

Myanmar has set a path to a bright energy future by 2030

Alan David Lee's picture
  Hong Sar/ World Bank
Photo © :  Hong Sar/ World Bank.

Kyaw San has trouble studying at night. The student from Yangon Division’s Buu Tar Suu village finds it especially difficult during the rainy season when his old solar-powered lamps cannot be charged, forcing him to study by candlelight. 
 
Win Win Nwe, a grade 5 student, also often prepares for exams by candlelight. Her family can’t always afford to buy candles, adding another obstacle to an activity many take for granted. “If we can afford candles, we buy them. If we can’t, we don’t. We struggle and do our best,” said her father Kyi Htwe.

Today, two-thirds of Myanmar’s population is not connected to the national electricity grid and 84% of rural households lack access to electricity. No power means no light, no refrigerators, no recharging phones and batteries. Small businesses can’t stay open in the evenings, and clinics cannot refrigerate medicines. Access to reliable and affordable energy is essential for a country’s development, job creation, poverty reduction and shared prosperity goals.

Steak, fries and air pollution

Garo Batmanian's picture
 Guangqing Liu
Photo © : Guangqing Liu

While most people link air pollution only to burning fossil fuels, other activities such as agriculture and biomass burning also contribute to it. The complexity of air pollution can be explained by analyzing the composition of the PM2.5, one the most important air pollution indicators. 
 

Việt Nam: Thắp sáng cuộc sống người dân nhờ lồng ghép y tế vào dự án thủy điện

Sang Minh Le's picture
Also available in: English
Việt Nam: Dự án khỏe mạnh là dự án tươi sáng

Một sớm mùa xuân năm 2016, bà Đinh Thị Son, người dân tộc Thái, đưa cháu bé 2 tháng tuổi tới công trường xây dựng của dự án thủy điện Trung Sơn để… khám bệnh. Tại sao lại đến công trường xây dưng? Bởi vì ở đó có một trung tâm y tế với đầy đủ trang thiết bị, thuốc men, xe cấp cứu, bác sĩ và điều dưỡng trực 24/7 để khám, chữa bệnh cho công nhân và người dân địa phương.

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