Syndicate content

Poverty

Reflections from the field: On the road with communities in Myanmar and Laos (Part 1)

Susan Wong's picture

So I just returned from a terrific mission to Myanmar and Laos, two countries experiencing strong annual growth rates, and both facing challenges of making rapid growth inclusive and just for all its citizens.

Staying the Course in Mongolia: 14 years institutionalizing community participation

Helene Carlsson Rex's picture
Also available in: Mongolian
In development we want things to go accordingly to plan.  We look for tools, guidelines and best practices in our quest for results and impact. But we also know that development is not an exact science and things do not always go according to plan.  Changes in government or an economic downturn can quickly make a project design irrelevant.

But in some cases, it does go (more or less) accordingly to plan despite bumps in the road along the way.  One such example is the Sustainable Livelihoods Program series in Mongolia, which on September 17, 2015 launched its third and final phase.

Back in 2002, after a series of particularly harsh winters that killed one-third of the livestock in Mongolia and added even more strain to an already impoverished rural population, the World Bank decided to support a new approach to sustainable livelihoods. At that time, the country had little history of community participation in local development planning, and few rural finance options.  

The vision was to place investment funds at the local level and to give the communities a strong voice in the allocation of these funds. Because of the risks associated with the severe winters in Mongolia, pastoral risk management and winter preparedness were to be strengthened. And with a history of inefficient central planning, supporting a policy shift towards greater fiscal decentralization was very important.

This vision and core principles were translated into the design of the three-part Sustainable Livelihoods Series, which included piloting, scaling-up and institutionalization phases.

Монголын нийгмийн халамжийн хөтөлбөрүүд ядуучуудад тусалж байна уу?

Junko Onishi's picture
Also available in: English

Албан бус орчуулга.


Монголын эдийн засгийн өнөөгийн байдал нь түүхий эдийн үнэ унасан, эдийн засгийн өсөлт буурсан гэдэг хоёр хүчин зүйлийн нийлбэр дээр байна. Энэ байдал нь орлогын бууралтад илүүтэй өртөж байгаа ядуучууд болон эмзэг бүлгийн хүмүүсийг хамгаалах нийгмийн халамжийн тогтолцоог шаардаж байгаа юм.

Нийгмийн халамжийн тогтолцоо хэр сайн ажиллаж байгааг дүгнэхийн тулд нийгмийн халамж юунд зарцуулагдаж байгааг, ядуу, эмзэг гэр бүлд зарцуулагдаж байна уу, үүнээс тэд хангалттай хамгаалалтыг авч чадаж байна уу гэдгийг авч үзэх хэрэгтэй. 

Social welfare programs in Mongolia - are they helping the poor?

Junko Onishi's picture
Also available in: Mongolian

Mongolia’s current economic situation is characterized by a combination of falling commodity prices and slowing growth. This heightens the need for the country’s social welfare system to protect the poor and the vulnerable from the threatened fall in incomes.

To assess how well the system is performing, it is necessary to consider Mongolia’s spending on social welfare - whether it is directed towards poor and vulnerable households, and if the benefits provide effective and adequate protection.

Maintaining momentum in Myanmar

Axel van Trotsenburg's picture

Myanmar is undergoing a historic transition. After decades of armed conflict and economic stagnation, the country is beginning to make important strides toward realizing its potential and the aspirations of its people.

Our engagement in Myanmar started more than 60 years ago when it became a member of the World Bank, soon after gaining independence from British rule.

Back in 1955, the Bank’s first economic report stated: “the lack of security remains a disrupting influence on the economic life of the country” while “the long term economic potentials are bright” on account of its moderate population growth and abundant natural resources. It also noted the importance of “encouraging private sector enterprise to improve the standard of living of the people”— these are topics that continue to resonate in today’s development discourse.

In the early 1950s, Myanmar’s GDP per-capita was comparable to that of Thailand, Korea, and Indonesia.  Like others in the region, Myanmar was coming out from colonial rule and a period of struggle. Sixty years on, Myanmar has a per capita GDP just above $1,100, less than one third the average for ASEAN countries and one of the lowest in East Asia.

The good news is that Myanmar has begun the catch up process. Major political and economic reforms since 2011 have increased civil liberties, reduced armed conflict, and removed constraints to trade and private enterprise that long held back the economy.

Đo lường nghèo ở Việt Nam như thế nào?

Linh Hoang Vu's picture
Also available in: English



Thế nào là nghèo ở Việt Nam? Khi tôi lớn lên ở Hà Nội trong những năm cuối thập kỷ 1980, có thể thấy cái nghèo ở khắp mọi nơi. Hầu hết người dân Việt Nam khi đó hẳn là sống ở mức dưới chuẩn nghèo quốc tế (1,25 đô-la một ngày). Bởi lẽ vào thời gian đó chưa có các cuộc khảo sát mức sống để đo lường nghèo nên cũng không có một cách thức rõ ràng để xác định như thế nào là nghèo. Người giàu thời đó là người nào trong nhà có xe máy hay TV, còn người nghèo là những người ăn xin ngoài đường hay người nào không có đủ gạo để ăn. Trong cuộc khảo sát sớm nhất được thực hiện vào năm 1992 và 1993, có khoảng 64% dân số được coi là nghèo theo chuẩn nghèo quốc tế. Sau hai thập kỷ thì chỉ có khoảng dưới 3% dân số là nghèo theo chuẩn nghèo này trong khi tình trạng đói ăn đã được xóa bỏ.

How We Measure Poverty in Vietnam

Linh Hoang Vu's picture
Also available in: Tiếng Việt



What does it mean to be poor in Vietnam? When I grew up in Hanoi in the late 80s, poverty was all around. Most of the population then was living under the international poverty line ($1.25 per day). Because there were no living standard surveys to measure poverty, there was no clear indication of what it meant to be poor. A rich person at that time was someone with either a motorbike or a television set, while a poor one was a street beggar or someone who did not have enough rice to eat.  In the earliest survey conducted in 1992 and 1993, about 64% of the population was poor by the international poverty line. Twenty years later, less than 3% were considered poor by the same standard while hunger was successfully eradicated.

Монголын шилжилт: Байхгүйгээс байгаа руу

Jim Anderson's picture
Also available in: English

Албан бус орчуулга.

Зарим үед огт санаандгүй газраас шинэ санаа төрдөг. Хэдэн сарын өмнө  Монголд буцаж ирсэнийхээ дараа би 1990-ээд онд энд амьдарч байснаас хойш Монголд ямар их зүйл өөрчлөгдсөнийг ажигласан. Олон өөрчлөлтийг  шууд хараад мэдэхээр байсан, тухайлбал, өндөр байшингууд, кафенуудыг шинэ гэдгийг анх удаа Монголд ирсэн гадаадын хүн ч хараад мэдэхээр байлаа. Энэ өөрчлөлт хэрхэн явагдсан нь нутаг руугаа буцах гэж байгаа гадаадын хүнтэй ярилцах сэдэв байсан юм.
Mongolia's black market in 1994
Монголын "хар зах" 1994 онд
фото: James H. Anderson
1993 онд Монголд би анх ирсэнийхээ дараа, энд ирсэн гадаадын хүний хамгийн түрүүн сурдаг үг нь “байхгүй” гэдэг үг гэдгийг мэдсэн. “Тийм юм байхгүй, бидэнд байхгүй, алга байна”. Эдгээр хэдэн үгийг зүгээр л толгойгоо сэгсрэх хөдөлгөөнөөр мөн орлож болдог байлаа.

“Танайд талх байна уу”
“Байхгүй”
“Будаа байна уу”
“Байхгүй”
“Ус /эсвэл цахилгаан, халаалт/ яагаад байхгүй байгаа юм бол”
“Байхгүй”

Mongolia’s Transitions: from Baikhgui to Baigaa

Jim Anderson's picture
Also available in: Mongolian
Sometimes insights come from unexpected sources. Ever since returning to Mongolia some months ago I have, naturally, been observing how things have changed since I last lived here in 1990s. Many of the changes are immediately recognizable and even foreigners arriving for the first time could guess that the high-rise buildings and cafes are new. But it was a chance conversation with a fellow foreigner that drove home just how dramatic those changes have been.
Mongolia's black market in 1994
Mongolia's black market in 1994
photo: James H. Anderson
When I moved to Mongolia in 1993, the first Mongolian word every foreigner learned was baikhgui. Not there; don’t have any; absent. With this simple utilitarian word, one could concisely express the verbal equivalent of a shake of the head.

“Do you have any bread?”
“Baikhgui.”
“Rice?”
“Baikhgui.”
“What happened to the water/electricity/heat?”
“Baikhgui.”

Bản đồ hóa chỉ số nghèo Việt Nam

Gabriel Demombynes's picture
Also available in: English

Chúng tôi vừa ra mắt trang web MapVietnam tại địa chỉ www.worldbank.org/mapvietnam/ trong đó cung cấp số liệu kinh tế xã hội cấp tỉnh và huyện của Việt Nam. Mục đích của trang web là cung cấp thông tin cho các phóng viên, các nhà hoạch định chính sách, nhà nghiên cứu, và tất cả những người dân cần thông tin về tình hình kinh tế xã hội tại địa phương. Bản đồ sẽ cung cấp các thông tin đa dạng về Việt Nam mà nếu chỉ nhìn vào con số thống kê tổng hợp thì rất khó để hình dung. Thông tin trên trang web được cung cấp cả bằng tiếng Việt và tiếng Anh.

Pages